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-   -   Gastric Bypass? (http://www.lowcarbfriends.com/bbs/weight-loss-surgery/824289-gastric-bypass.html)

RenoMom 02-23-2014 06:23 AM

Gastric Bypass?
 
Okay so currently Im having surgery for kidney stones nextweek. The Dr wants to send me to theBariatric center after Im healed from the stones etc.... He thinks with my Genes, Hypothyroid, and other things that it is near impossible for me to lose and keep this weight off on my own.

So tell me have you had it done and would you do it again? Whats the down time like?

Any insite I would appreiate.

myyellowstang 02-23-2014 09:13 AM

I had a RNY (gastric bypass) and I'd do it again in a heartbeat. But I didn't do it on recommendation of someone else and it was a long 5 years of consideration before I committed. You need to be mentally ready on your own time to do this. There is research and prep you need to do... it needs to be your decision wholly.

I was off 4 weeks. I had a physically demanding job (OR nurse) and took the full length of time I could. I could have gone back at probably week or two post op if my job were sedentary or light duty, but your energy level is so low don't expect to get much done lol.

The changes post op are HUGE. I mourned food. Food wad comfort to me and it was GONE.

Basically, you just need to know what you are getting into and if you can handle the changes and committment. Physically, mentally and emotionally.

ravenrose 02-23-2014 09:30 AM

I believe that if eating a REALLY low carb and calorie controlled diet doesn't do it, it's very unlikely the surgery will do it. I suppose the radical kind that removes a good deal of your intestines might be an exception, but look into the exact sort you are considering.

most bariatric surgery just forces you to eat a very low carb/low calorie diet, it doesn't do anything special to help weight loss beyond that. every type of wls has some proportion of patients who do not end up losing weight after the surgery. the more invasive the surgery, the less this is a problem, but of course there are more serious other problems then.

sometimes if you weigh the two options, actually forcing yourself to adhere to the woe you know you need vs the surgery, you will have extra motivation to do it. none of the dangerous and inconvenient side effects.

best of luck!

Leo41 02-23-2014 10:19 AM

But many women CAN'T eat a low-carb, calorie controlled diet--except via WLS.

My sister was one of them. She developed Type2 diabetes, and at close to 300lbs, she really tried to lose weight, but she was unable to stay with any plan. She struggled for several years, and in the meantime her blood glucose was getting out of control--3 meds daily and still high. Her doctor recommended WLS.

She had the gastric sleeve procedure last spring, and within 3 months had normal blood sugar with NO meds at all. She stayed with me for a month post-op, and I'm really grateful that I was able to lose without WLS because I saw how difficult it was at first, but it was definitely the right thing for her.

The other good news is that because of the nutritional advice of the WLS nutritionist to focus on sufficient protein, she has become a very healthy eater. She commented to me recently that one of the easiest things to eat is anything sugar laden (candy, ice cream, cake), but she's so grateful that her diabetes is under control that she's not the least tempted to indulge.

WLS has given her the ability (and the mental attitude) to eat for health and weight management, so it's been a total success for her.

I'm sure this is a YMMV issue.

Jesse 02-23-2014 10:58 AM

I disagree with RavenRose. I lost 55 pounds following a classic low carb diet, but I was not able to maintain my loss. With WLS I lost 140 pounds and have maintained my loss thus far. My chances of success are MUCH greater with this surgery. And this is not my opinion, this is based on statistics ~ maybe people won't maintain all of their loss, but morbidly obese people will have a significantly better chance through wls than by diet and exercise alone. Obesity is a tough disease to treat and has complex and multiple causes ~ so far wls is the best treatment tool available. Does it work perfectly for every person, no it does not. Is there statistically any other more effective treatment available right now to treat morbid obesity, none so far that are even close.

Jesse 02-23-2014 11:17 AM

I would also add that I am maintaining my loss at a higher level of carbs than I did with Atkins. I eat good carbs such as steel cut oatmeal, fruit, veggies, brown rice and yogurt. My surgery was a gastric sleeve ~ for me the change in hunger hormones (the part of my stomach cut away produced the majority of these hormones) has changed everything. Now I fight the war on only one front instead of two, before I fought both physical and psychological impulses to eat, now just the psychological ones. And they are so much easier to deal with when my body isn't screaming feed me :)

Hot Tamale 02-23-2014 11:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jesse (Post 16812143)
I disagree with RavenRose. I lost 55 pounds following a classic low carb diet, but I was not able to maintain my loss. With WLS I lost 140 pounds and have maintained my loss thus far. My chances of success are MUCH greater with this surgery. And this is not my opinion, this is based on statistics ~ maybe people won't maintain all of their loss, but morbidly obese people will have a significantly better chance through wls than by diet and exercise alone. Obesity is a tough disease to treat and has complex and multiple causes ~ so far wls is the best treatment tool available. Does it work perfectly for every person, no it does not. Is there statistically any other more effective treatment available right now to treat morbid obesity, none so far that are even close.

:goodpost: I, too, strongly disagree.

I would do it again in a heartbeat. If you are ready for the pretty much total lifestyle changes that gastric bypass requires you can be amazingly successful. I worked hard to lose over 200 pounds... Then, over about the last year, I gained about 25 back. Now, I am working just as hard as anyone else to lose that... It isn't a quick fix or a sure thing - it requires dedication and effort. However, like Jesse said, it makes the fight winnable!!!

PS: As for down time... I had to have an open gastric bypass, so my recovery took longer. I'd say it was a month before I could go back to work. Totally worth it in every way.

Jesse 02-23-2014 03:04 PM

My journey started right at this forum when I read about a WLS called a gastric sleeve or VSG. I had never heard of that type of surgery. I started reading about WLS on the internet, found boards like this except all about WLS and I read about the good bad and ugly from probably 1000s of people who had WLS. After researching for 6 months, I went to an informational meeting at a hospital that had earned a a designation as a clinic of excellence from a surgical board. In fact, my insurance requires that you use a program that has earned that rating. My insurance also requires a 6 month medically supervised diet before surgery. Not so much to lose weight (although it helps if you do) but to learn what will be required to be successful post -op. So from first exploration, what is wls, what are my options, is this for me, to preparing, to actual surgery took me about a year. It is a big thing to do, so you want to know what exactly you are choosing. Almost 2 years post surgery, I couldn't be any happier with my choice. I would go through the surgery every year if I had to (luckily one surgery is sufficient :)) to reap the benefits I am currently enjoying. It has changed my life in big and small ways, and I am filled with gratitude that I had this option to regain my health.

GME 02-23-2014 08:49 PM

I haven't had any WLS, but I do believe it does something besides force you on a diet. I have known people "cured" of their diabetes after surgery. For a long time I thought it was the diet people followed after WLS, but they were leaving the hospital with completely normal blood sugars, long before they had time to eat or not eat anything.

There is a lot of new information coming out about the effect the gut has on all aspects of health. I am not surprised anymore that removing a chunk of it changes the body.

solski 02-24-2014 10:07 AM

I am considering it. But I am also scared and using the *SCARE* factor to help me lose weight. Down 55 lbs so far - but also went to my orientation and am doing my pre-op testing. Will make my final decision in a few months. I have backed out before :) I don't believe the surgery is the end all of cures. BUT if I was diabetic I would probably definitely do it -- the research shows that the gastric bypass does something to a person (and they are still trying to figure it out) that alleviates diabetes (Type II). Just my two cents :)

NotSoTall 02-24-2014 03:34 PM

I just had gastric sleeve 2 weeks ago. I had successfully lost weight before, and most successfully with low carb. The problems came with keeping it moving down and ultimately not being able to maintain. With PCOS I was(am) constantly battling the mixed up hormones that made it really easy to gain and really tough to lose enough to get to a healthy weight.

In addition to PCOS and metabolic syndrome (per my doctor) I also began to have high blood pressure, GERD, hiatal hernia issues including vomiting almost every day. My lungs were getting damaged from essentially inhaling stomach fluids each night. That damage is likely permanent. And my cholesterol was getting worse, though I know the industry issues with that, but on the medical records it was one more co-morbidity.

So after lots of thinking, researching, and knowing that no matter how hard I fight I'll likely regain (the 95% that do, statistically) and knowing my quality of life was getting worse all the while I decided to ask my medical group about the WLS options. When I asked the doctor if she thought I'd be a good candidate, and further if she thought I'd qualify through my insurance she broke out in a big smile and said "oh yes". It was a little shocking as I knew I had issues, but wow. Add that to a BMI equal to severely morbidly obese due to my height.

So here I am 2 weeks out and learning the ropes of this new tool. Not finding the nutrition element difficult due to low and lower carb eating over the years. Where it takes me only time will tell, but what I can say without a doubt is i've had two weeks without vomiting, no GERD symptoms, no coughing up big (possible tmi) gummy phlegm clumps each morning. This alone is a minor miracle for me. Mind you, I take a prescribed antacid, but I took them before the surgery too. Now I take less and have no symptoms.

And if I can lose the weight too, icing on the proverbial cake. And according to some statistics there is a much better chance than 5% that I'll keep much of the weight off after many years. Of course that's up to me to not mess up with this new tool of mine.

As for downtime, I'm off work for 6 weeks. But I'm not bed bound or anything. Have been taking walks since the day of surgery. There is some fatigue, but there are also bursts of energy. Not supposed to lift over 10 pounds, or do twisting, bending in any major way for those 6 weeks. Post-op visit in 2 days so I'll learn more then.

No matter which path you choose, wishing you health! :up:

AllisonB 02-24-2014 06:49 PM

I was an insulin-dependent Type 2 diabetic and my diabetes is now resolved. I took 6 prescription meds daily for diabetes, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol. Today, I take only vitamins. I've lost 140 pounds since the day I decided to have surgery very slightly less than half my weight).

My bariatric surgeon's office has a free monthly seminar that is a presentation, past surgery patients speak to the group, and then Q&A. No pressure. At the end you can make an appointment for a consultation, or just leave, they don't harass you or even call. Try to find a seminar in your area - and ask lots of questions here, there, everywhere.

onedimsim 02-26-2014 12:44 PM

IMHO, make sure you investigate ALL of the Bariatric procedures out there - yes RnY is the most popular, but there are more available - just make sure you are informed!

RenoMom 03-02-2014 08:10 AM

Thank you so much everyone! Your insites are all very helpful.
I also lost 50lb on LC years ago, and other plans like JUDD have lost me a few lbs but I cannot keep it off. I know my Thyroid is a huge part of this. I have thought of it years past but I have never discussed it with a Dr. I really did not think that my insurance would cover it, still not sure, i have a lot of research to do. I am a bookeeper at a smal company so I am very concerned with how much time I would need to be off. Im at a desk all day so maybe i can go back sooner than most. Anyways thank you all for your storys they really help.

mojocat 03-02-2014 09:08 AM

I don't know much about the procedure but I am a huge fan of Barbara Berkeley, a bariatric doctor who is a Primal eater and who wrote "Refuse to Regain" a book mainly about keeping weight off in maintenance (and I just love her common sense and strategies). Anyway I notice a comment on her facie saying the trend worldwide is now moving toward gastric sleeve operations rather than gastric bypass. It appears that weight loss and metabolic improvements are similar in both, but sleeve (which narrows stomach size but leaves intestines intact) is less invasive.

Hot Tamale 03-02-2014 04:07 PM

I'd say a different kind of invasive, if that makes sense. Look into the pros and cons of each, of course... A lot of people with the sleeve can have issues with stomach acid. I do not hear that from bypass patients (including myself). Both can have great results!!

Jesse 03-03-2014 07:39 PM

I had a sleeve, but I would have considered the bypass. Because of scarring and adhesions from endometriosis my surgeon said he would not do a bypass. I agree that anyone considering wls should investigate all options.

Mair 03-04-2014 08:10 AM

9 weeks out from having the sleeve. I did so much investigating. Best to find a forum that deals mainly with weightloss surgery. One I went to was Bariatricpal. Lots of great information from actual patients. Even with the surgery it is hard to lose it.

RenoMom 03-12-2014 08:17 PM

Thanks Mair, good luck to you

GS Fan 04-03-2014 04:34 PM

I agree with Mair. I have lost 120 pounds since February 2013. I had GB surgery last July and even though I lose each month, it is not exactly melting off. Part of that is probably my age. Another part is that I am lazy and really don't exercise.

Good luck!

Jesse 04-03-2014 05:47 PM

I averaged a weight loss of about 10 pounds a month (sleeve patient). It's possible with careful dieting and no surgery I could have some months when I lost 10 or more pounds. What I COULDN'T do is consistently lose month after month after month and even more importantly I simply could not maintain my losses. That's the edge that WLS gives me.

Aomiel 04-04-2014 05:25 PM

Unfortunately, I think too many people go into WLS with the idea that it is some type of miracle cure. That it will somehow stop them from overeating or eating the wrong foods. It won't. You will still be able to eat your way around your band, sleeve or bypass if you choose to do so. It will still take self-control and discipline, although there is a honeymoon period with WLS where weight is dropped very quickly...which can be very motivating all by itself...but ultimately it will be up to you to *choose* to eat the right foods and to not overeat.

dollgirl48 04-17-2014 06:32 PM

Gastric Bypass
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Hot Tamale (Post 16821514)
I'd say a different kind of invasive, if that makes sense. Look into the pros and cons of each, of course... A lot of people with the sleeve can have issues with stomach acid. I do not hear that from bypass patients (including myself). Both can have great results!!

Really take it seriously. Your heart and mind have to be in it. It's just a tool and the tool only has an open window for so many months and then if you don't change you'll be back to losing weight the way you was before but you want have the too. Research and research. Doctors, former patients. an statistics on the pros and cons. I won't tell you my story. Just know I've been there.

Matrigna 04-22-2014 11:10 AM

I had gastric bypass surgery on 11/29/14. Black Friday :)

I'm hypothyroid, with hashimoto's, adrenal fatigue/exhaustion, papillary thyroid cancer, PCOS, leptin-resistant, hypertensive, etc. (Over half of this list is now gone).

I could NOT lose weight. It made no sense. I went on Atkins in March 2003. I lost 85 lbs! But, after thyroid and other issues were finally diagnosed, it took forever to lose weight and felt near impossible to keep it off. I had to stay zero carb and very low calorie to maintain. My prescription list kept growing and I felt worse and worse. I was miserable and beyond frustrated. It made absolutely no sense that nothing was working, despite holistic docs, dieticians, endocrinologists, the prescriptions, the calorie counting and shunning of all things carb. I was down, but still obese, and I knew that was not normal for me.

Since surgery? Those are my surgery stats, under my avatar. Surgery day/now/goal. I'm losing weight! It's been going on five months. I am following all of the rules and plan to continue doing so, but it's so much easier to follow rules when they are working and giving you back your quality of life, helping you to feel amazing. I'm off of all prescription meds, except for a half-dose of my thyroid meds, which my endo wants to keep lowering. My hunger is gone. My energy slumps are gone. I'm motivated, personally, professionally, and with getting out there and moving! I feel better than I have in a decade. I haven't experienced complications. I am eating normal, whole foods, balanced, lower-carb diet without cravings. This is SO much better. I'm overall so happy. I think weight loss surgery may be my best decision ever.

As far as which WLS, I think it's very much personal preference and what the surgeon you trust recommends. It's important to really research and take your time to learn your options.


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