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Old 06-02-2014, 01:51 PM   #1
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Adventures of a happy eating chick in skinny jeans

Calichris - I stole your happy eating thing but I am giving you all the credit and 10% of future proceeds

I'll start with an intro that I posted in Carolina Coast's journal...


I want to preface this by saying I was a naturally thin person in my teens and most of my 20's. I went through an emotionally difficult time in my 20's, gained a few pounds and discovered dieting. That is when my eating got really nutty and disordered.

So throughout my 30's and 40's (I'm 44 now), I've pretty consistently been 30-60 pounds overweight. I ate for every conceivable reason and hunger was something I was completely out of touch with in my life. If I wasn't stuffed to the gills, I ate. If the clock said 8 am or 12 noon or 5 pm, I ate. Hunger never factored into the equation for me.

On December 3rd of last year I slipped on a patch of ice and fell. I knew instantly that my ankle was broken and I was diagnosed with having one small fracture in my left ankle and sent home with crutches and a boot. I could feel myself spiraling down emotionally at the prospect of having no mobility for the next month. I could see myself laying in bed and eating crap all day everyday and I decided I wanted something good to come out of the experience. I started a low carb diet on Dec. 6th. The next week my ankle seemed to be getting worse so I went in for a 2nd opinion and found out I had fractured both bones in my ankle and had to have surgery the next day to put in a steel plate and metal screws. Yikes.

The day of surgery I didn't eat or drink anything. My surgery was scheduled for 4 pm but ended up being pushed back until 7 pm because of 2 car wrecks that took precedent. At 10 pm when I woke up from surgery, I hadn't eaten anything in 28 hours and instead of feeling faint and weak, I felt calm. I felt fine and I had all day. I really had no idea that I could that long without eating. It was a revelation of sorts. The next week I stumbled upon Dr. Mosely's documentary for the BBC titled "Eat, fast and live longer". I decided to do his program and started the next day (mid-December). I fasted 2 days a week(500 cals) and ate what I wanted the other 5. In early January I learned about alternate day fasting in reading Dr. Kristen Varady's work and I switched to 4:3 and stayed there until I reached my goal in early April. During that time I had a cast on for the first 7 weeks and a boot and crutches for the following 4 weeks.

I've owned the book by Josie Spinardi for over a year. I bought it for my Kindle, read a few pages and moved on to the next diet I wanted to try. I have in all honesty read about 95% of the diet books that are out there. Low carb. Low fat. Vegetarian. Vegan. Raw vegan. Paleo. Macrobiotic. The Zone. All of them. It was a huge part of my identity. But I read Josie's book all the way through in February. I've probably read it 4 times now. Every time I read it, new things grab my attention. I put more of her principles into practice. Her book changed my life and helped me get back to being a naturally thin person with a good relationship with food. I eat carbs. I eat meat. Chocolate makes me happy. I will never label myself as anything other than a hunger directed eater again. I remember being at this incredible Italian restaurant last year with a huge group of friends and ordering a grilled chicken and veggies because I wasn't eating starches that month. I watched people around me eat garlic bread and fettuccini alfredo and tiramiso and I felt so deprived. Most of the people around me were naturally thin people. They all oohed and ahhhed about the food and none of them finished their portions. Or took doggie bags home so they could binge on the leftovers later. They were carefree and I was obsessed. Never again

So my stats are that I started at 193 pounds and now I weigh 137. I actually need to put a few pounds back on because my boobs have vanished and I miss them. I started out wearing a size XL top and now I wear size small. I wore 16/18 pants and now I wear mostly 8's. I'm 5'10 inches and small boned frame. My resting heart rate has been in the 90's my entire life and this morning it was 64. Happy happy.

I think the naturally thin program is a great fit with Intermittent Fasting. You're limited in your calories on your down day but you could choose to eat chocolate cake for your 500 calories but most of us realize you can have a much nicer meal with chicken and veggies and salad and choose to spend out calories that way. Most people who I've seen really struggle with intermittent fasting are still in the dieting mindset and they binge on their up days. I think that's where Josie's book made the difference for me. My binge eating was always about a food being bad and I wouldn't be eating it anymore so I better eat 27 portions of it while I can. I don't see food as being good or bad. There are only foods I like and foods I don't like.

It's been almost 6 months since I started on this journey. I want to shout it from the rooftops. Intermittent fasting will help you shed your excess weight and get healthier and
the naturally thin principle will completely change your relationship with food.
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Old 06-02-2014, 02:01 PM   #2
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Old 06-02-2014, 02:04 PM   #3
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Old 06-02-2014, 02:06 PM   #4
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Clearly got my sass back
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Old 06-02-2014, 02:09 PM   #5
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A link that does to a video with a simple explanation on Intermittent Fasting. This one is The Fast Diet where you fast 2 days and eat normally for the other 5. I practiced 4:3 for the majority of my journey. Easy Peasy.

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Old 06-03-2014, 05:41 AM   #6
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Last night was good/strange/different. Yesterday I had a couple of cups of coffee mmmm in the morning. I am never hungry in the morning. Headed to the gym with dd's and decided to walk on the outside track for a couple of miles. Then a girlfriend from Texas called me and we chatted while I walked.

I felt hungry around 1 pm and tried to figure out what I was in the mood for at that moment. Ended up running by the store and picking up a bagel with melted cheese and jalapeno's. I came home and cut it in half and put it under the broiler to toast it. Then I added Veganaise
and sliced turkey. I had that with some wheat thins. It was delicious and I ate about 2/3 of the sandwich and all of the wheat thins. Bagel sandwiches used to be a big thing for me. They called to me in the middle of the night. lol I would seriously eat 2-3 over the course of the day. Yesterday...meh. I could take it or leave it. Fantastic!!

Last night both the teenagers were out and about so the 3 of us went to dinner. I really wanted a chile relleno but they had sold them all (boo!). I ordered a big ass burrito with grilled steak and rice and beans. It was good and I ate it slowly and probably ate about 2/3 then was done.

When I got home the serious snacking started. Now *my* criteria for eating is..Am I hungry? Am I having a craving? Those 2 things are the green light for me. Last night the answer to both was no. But I ate a bunch of Dove dark chocolates with almonds and some nutter butters. Some kinds of dark chocolate (the darker stuff) I can eat one or two squares and I'm done. The dove chocolates? I could eat the whole bag in one sitting. Hmm I think that's one food that I won't keep in the house for the time be. I'm not sure if I was *eating cause I ate* or if in the back of my head I was thinking that I need to gain a few pounds back and so I should eat and eat. I want to gain some back but it's a process. I want to do it in a healthy way.

Enjoying my coffee now then DD and I are headed to our 2nd ever Zumba class. LOVED the first one.

Joanna
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Old 06-03-2014, 06:10 AM   #7
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An oldie but a goody. Margaret Cho gave a great example of being fed up with dieting!

I have lost some weight which has set off a strange wave of paranoia among people that I have either had my stomach stapled or shut off with a rubber band, or am on some freaky raw food diet or whatever.

What happened was that I was sick and tired of dieting and working out. I was sick and tired of buying clothes that were too small for me so I could 'thin into them.' I was sick and tired of eating 5 to 7 small meals a day. I was sick and tired of no carbs. I was sick and tired of thinking about food and not thinking about food. I was sick and tired of my trainer and any type of exercise. I went to a nutritionist and I lost a lot - of money. Shakes, pills, supplements, food substitutes, exercise programs.

I stopped going to Fred Segal and getting the one thing in the whole store that fit me. I started buying clothes that fit me, like now. I put away all notions of what diets meant to me, what I was supposed to eat and not supposed to eat. I altogether lost the thought process that carried me through my life - my dieting and exercise regimen - and started thinking about the people I loved, hated, tolerated, laughed at, laughed with. There was a lot of time to read. I wanted to watch old movies. I ate a lot of crappy food. I gained some weight and it was scary. But it didn't really make a difference. I stopped exercising, and started writing. I played with my dogs. I looked at stuff on Ebay. I started to eat what I wanted - and kept doing it. Not a food vacation - not a respite between diets. I just was going to eat eat eat eat eat eat and then eat some more.

Then, I kind of started to get weirdly thinner. I get it now. Because I don't care about food, it is there when I want it, I don't crave it and want it and think about it. Since I can have everything, nothing is that important. I don't need to eat a whole cake because I can eat a whole cake every day every meal if I want and I don't care. I don't prepare to eat because I might be hungry later and 'they' won't have what I have to eat. When I am hungry, I eat. You know, that is what the weird diet is.

Here is what I usually eat every day. In the morning I have a bowl of cereal with two kinds mixed, granola and LIFE. If I am in a hotel, I have granola and yogurt, croissants, one chocolate and one regular and then a big cranberry juice. I drink a lot of water, and a lot of lemonade, regular COKE - no diet anything ever. After that, I usually eat a peanut butter cup or something like that. Then I get to work, which is writing usually, recording sometimes, interviews, etc.. I get hungry later around early afternoon, and so I eat what I think is a good thing at the moment, which could be mac and cheese, or pizza. I eat as much as I want, but it is usually too rich to eat all of it and since I am not dieting and I don't need to cram the forbidden food in before the diet starts up again, I eat as much as I feel good eating and leave the rest. I leave a lot on the plate because I need not clean my plate. Why? I don't have to. And the value of not having to finish all my food, probably has been the biggest contributor to my healing around food. I used to feel like I needed to eat all of it, all and then some, but actually, it doesn't feel good to do that. It doesn't taste good. I can have more when I am hungry again. I eat dinner late, usually with friends. I like appetizers. I will order 3-4 types, so I can have a variety of edible treats, instead of an entree. If I order entrees, it would be more than one, because I deserve to eat what I like. I never eat leftovers. I never take anything home. I never eat anything that doesn't taste heavenly. I never eat when I am not hungry. I never let myself get too hungry. I never deny myself a thing because I have denied myself enough for 1000 lifetimes and there is no more denial for me in the way that I live. I deserve all the mozzarella sticks, all the chocolate, all the pizza, all the chicken a'la king, and I deserve to leave what I don't finish on the plate.

So there you go. Big secret diet. Love. Love and the audacity to actually waste food.

Last edited by Joanna; 06-03-2014 at 06:11 AM..
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Old 06-03-2014, 06:14 AM   #8
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The seven secrets of naturally thin people

Secret #1: Practice Intuitive Weight Maintenance ~ Naturally thin people have a stable weight and don't worry what it is. Naturallt thin people don't weigh, measure, or otherwise keep track of their bodies' dimensions. They don't need to weigh themselves because they trust their bodies to regulate their weight on their own.
Can you trust your body to take you to the weight that is truly healthy for you, that you'll be able to maintain with no effort at all? What are your fears about letting your weight stabilize? What would it be like to ACT AS IF you never had a weight problem, and to let go of your weight worries completely?

Secret #2: Apply an intuitive attitude ~ Naturally thin people have a positive view of themselves and their lives. Poeple who have never had a weight problem know that the key to happiness is in how they percieve themselves and their lives.
Have you been putting thinness before happiness? What kinds of criticism have you been carrying around with you? What positive thoughts can you carry around with you instead? What would it be like to ACT AS IF you never had a weight problem and be happy, right now, today?

Secret #3: Know intuitively why to eat. Naturally thin people eat when they are hungry but they eat for other reasons as well.
Reason #1:Physical need. Physical need involves your body's need for fuel to function healthfully.
Reason #2: Physical Desire. Physical desire involves wanting to eat due to external triggers, such as seiing food, smelling food, or hearing others eating food.
Reason#3: Emotional Desire. Emotional desire involves eating as a means of coping with your emotions.
Naturally thin people eat 75-100% of the time out of physical need, and you can be in that range too. It's fine to eat some of the time because you want to, or occasionally because you're having a bad day. Enjoy that piece of cheesecake from the dessert tray, simply because it looks so good and you want to taste it. Have a custard-filled doughnut, because it's your favorite comfort food and you're feeling really stressed. Just be aware of what you're doing. Pay attention to why you're eating, and make your choices in a conscious, proportioned way.
As you think about a typical day, what percentage of the time do you currently eat out of a physical need, physical desire, and emotional desire? What physical desire traps are you aware of? What emotional dersire triggers are you aware of? What do you need to do differently to change the proportion of the reasons why you eat? What would it be to ACT AS IF you are already able to eat for the right reasons?

Secret #4: Know intuitively what to eat. ~ Naturally thin people eat exactly what they are hungry for. They seem to have an inherant sense of what they really need, saying things like "I could really go for a chicken sandwich" or "My body is craving lots of veggies right now." They'll go out of their way to get what they're hungry for even if it means making a shopping trip. Have you ever experienced deprivation? You probably know the scene. You go out for lunch with a friend. You scan the menu to find the item that is lowest in fat and calories. During your scan, you notice the restaurant's special: lasagna, your favorite. You think to yourself, "Lasagna? Wow, that sounds good. Oh, and garlic bread comes with it. Yum! But, no, that has far too much fat." You find the heart healthy section and make your decision. "I'll have the light chef salad", you say to the waiter, with a smug look on your face. You're feeling pretty good about your choice because it has fat-free meat and cheese, fat-free dressing, a fat-free roll - only 5 grams of fat in the whole meal. Then your friend orders. "I'll have the lasagna with garlic bread," she says with a smile. You look at her and wonder how she can keep her figure and eat the way she does. Your meal comes, and the entire time you are gazing at your friend's plate as she eats. "Oh, this is wonderful!" she exclaims. "Do you want a taste?" "Oh no'" you say, "I have plenty here." When she slips away to the restroom, you grab your fork and take several quick bites off her plate. "Much better than this salad," you think. you clean your plate, and still find yourself looking for more. You have a craving for something...but what? Meanwhile, your friend has left over half of her meal on her plate. She takes it home with her in a take-out container. You are thinking, "I wish I hsd that to take home with me...that's what I really want." An hour later, you stop at a take-out Italian restaurant and order lasagna to go. You polish off the entire serving. Your craving is finally satisfied, but now you are overstuffed. Wouldn't it have been better if you had just ordered the lasagna in the first place?
What happens when you make your food choices based on what you think you should eat? What are some of your "forbidden foods," and what would it be like to let this label go? How do you feel after eating your current food choices? What foods would you like to try adding to your intake? What would happem if you checked in with your inner wisdom the next time you feel hungry? What would it be like to ACT AS IF you never had a weight problem, eating exactly the food that you really need?

Secret #5: Know intuitively how much to eat. ~ Naturally thin people stop eating before they get too full. They often leave food on their plates when dining out, because the typical restaurant portion is usually more than the body needs. They don't worry about "portion control," because they know exactly how much food to serve themselves, without weighing or measuring anything. At one time I lived by portion control. There were various ways I tracked portions: by weight, by volume, by exchanges. But the problem with portion control is that it does not account for the normal variations in caloric need that occur from day to day, so some days the portions were too big, some days too small, depending on how active I was. Eating based on portion control resulted in my getting out of touch with my body's inherent ability to eat the amount of food that is right for me.
How do you decide how much food to eat? What else do you do while you eat, and how do these distractions affect the amount of food you consume? What would it be like to ACT AS IF you never had a weight problem, and trust your body's inner wisdom to help you choose the right amount?

Secret #6: Exercise with Intuition ~ Naturally thin people enjoy a variety of fitness activities in reasonable amounts. They exercise on a regular basis, without going overboard. There is consistency without compulsivity. They use exercise guidelines, but in a way that honors their bodies' needs. Some exercise for a longer duration than others, and some work out at more advanced levels than others. Their bodies just seem to know how much exercise is right for them. But regardless of the level of conditioning, they all have some level of commitment to making fitness a part of their lives.
What message is your body trying to tell you? Do you think you are doing too little exercise, or too much? What type of activites do you think you'd enjoy? What would it be like to ACT AS IF you never had a weight problem, and trust your body's inner wisdom to guide you to the type and amount of activity that your body truly needs?

Secret #7: Live an Intuitive Life! ~ Naturally thin people have truly fulfilling lives(and it's not because they are thin). Thinness is part of their experience, but it is not the source of their fulfillment. They have meaningful relationships with others. They enjoy significant experiences in both their professional and personal lives. They focus far beyond the number on the bathroom scale, tapping into their deepest and truest passions.

They possess the ability to move beyond society's standards of what life should be, instead following their intuition about what would ofer true meaning. This is not about abandoning worldly things - giving up all possessions and goals - but rather, it is about giving up the attachment to worldly things. It means having a goal without being attached to the outcome of the goal. If the goal is achieved, great. If the goal is not achieved, this is still great. No attachment to the outcome. The focus shifts to enjoying the process of achieving goals, instead of only enjoying their outcome. In this way, well-being is not contingent on any circumstances.
Well-being is enjoying life, here and now, in the moment. With this insight I realized that in this moment, I have all I need to be perfectly happy.
Have you been caught up in the "disease called MORE"? What goals or material possessions have you been pursuing? What would it be like to let gof your attachment to the outcome of these goals, and just enjoy the process? What would it be like to ACT AS IF you never had a weight problem, and enjoy the full rich life you already have?
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Old 06-03-2014, 06:31 AM   #9
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Hi there! I'm very interested to follow your journal. You may want to go over to my journal and post a link to yours so everybody can follow along with you. There's a lot of great stuff here!
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Old 06-03-2014, 09:29 AM   #10
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Great job!
Thanks for all the info.
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Old 06-03-2014, 02:42 PM   #11
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Haven't had a chance to read yet, but I'm subscribing!
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Old 06-03-2014, 02:43 PM   #12
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Thank you LC Librarian.

Great idea Carolina Coast. I just posted a link. Your journal is such a fantastic place for people to come for information and support and encouragement!!
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Old 06-03-2014, 03:17 PM   #13
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Gotta run right now but I'm subbing to read later. I can't wait!
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Old 06-03-2014, 04:24 PM   #14
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great article!
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Old 06-03-2014, 06:13 PM   #15
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Subbing, and enjoyed the articles! Thanks
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Old 06-04-2014, 05:27 AM   #16
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Enjoyed your writings. Wow what knowledge you have gained. Thanks for sharing...
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Old 06-04-2014, 05:50 AM   #17
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Welcome ladies

This is an article written years ago but a lot of us can relate to it.

*The Zen of Dieting*

I never met a diet I didn't like, and the more rules, the better. Some people go from therapy to therapy. I go from diet to diet. Low-fat, high-fat, cabbage soup, stone soup: I've lost weight on every food plan it la mode I've tried in the past decade. Most any type of diet will work for me 'cause I've got what it takes: discipline, zeal and an insane optimism. (This is the one!) At long last, I will conquer the lumpy pounds that stand between me and the size 10 trousers hanging in my closet. I visualize success: 1 am slim. I am powerful. I am woman.

Going on a diet is a great psychological tonic, delivering instant relief from the emotional conflicts of the moment. For example, once, after I quit a high-stress editing job that consumed my life for three years, I was rattling around the house, confused about what to do next. Look for a terrific new job that would impress my former colleagues? Write that long-awaited novel? Change careers and become a ... a ... what? My New Age friends suggested I sit tight and honor my confusion. As if. I decided to follow my heart. I went on a diet.

After all, dieting can fill pretty much any vacuum in a woman's life. There's the shopping, the cooking, the counting of nutritional components of every mouthful and, of course, the week's grand finale: getting on the scale. This single act can override any confusion you are having about whether or not you're meeting your life's goals. If the scale says you lost, you're a winner. If you've gained, you know what you are.

Don't tell me that diets don't work. The only complaint I have is that they don't work for long (let alone forever). Truth be told, I've been experiencing a certain diet burnout. I've been searching for my next diet, but nothing piques my interest. It's kind of a "been there, done that" feeling.

This slackening of zeal I blame on meditation. Learning to meditate offered me an opportunity to obsess about something else. It took me a good week to figure out how to create a 20-minute oasis for myself every morning. But once I'd settled on a spot to sit and convinced my husband that no matter how fascinating the story he just heard on the morning news was, it could wait. Then something happened. I got hooked. Those 20 minutes every morning have become the best part of my day.

As I continue to meditate, its seditious influence only grows. Taking those few minutes each day to view myself as part of the cosmos has encouraged living in the clear-sighted "now" that little sliver of reality that sometimes peeks through all the regrets and intentions that occupy my thoughts.

And it's very hard to diet in the "now." Dieting is about the future--scarfing down an entire bucket of salty peanuts today because tomorrow, for absolutely certain, absolutely, I'm going on the Not-One-Peanut-Ever Diet.

With the zeal of a new convert, I decided to change my approach to eating. I would learn to love and accept the total diet experience--both the losing the weight (sex appeal! soy products! sacrifice!) and the gaining (fries! French toast! freedom!).

It was this insight that finally led to the invention of my latest food program. It's based on my new belief that you can eat mostly healthful foods most of the time, but you can't eat all healthful foods all of the time. Sure, most of the time I keep an eye on calories, fat grams and green, orange, red and yellows. But human situations--and moods--are variable, and sometimes there's a need to disregard the sensible. On those days, the wine flows like bottled water. Starches `R' Us. Sweets Are Love. Crunch as You Go. Eat It All. But because I now see this as a treat, or a consolation but not self-flagellation--I stop eating just short of a stomachache.

I call this the Good Enough Diet. Whatever I ate yesterday, it was good enough. I smile at myself in the mirror, whether or not the panty lines are showing through those size 10 trousers. Because I know this is the one!
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Old 06-04-2014, 05:56 AM   #18
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What happens when we label certain foods as bad??

Labeling a Food Bad Can Make You Think About It More

So you've decided sugar is bad for you. What is the next step? Avoid it, at least when you are being good. How do you avoid sugar? You have to be on the watch for it. You have to notice it, everywhere, so that you can avoid it. And then what happens?

Sugar seems to turn up everywhere. It's all over the menus. In fact, sugar is the first thing you look for on the menu. So that you can avoid it. It's everywhere you look at the grocery store. It is even in your kitchen cabinets! The more you look for sugar, the more you, uh, can't avoid it! Sugar is even on your mind more than ever. AAAGGGHHH.

And that is scary! The very thing you are avoiding is what you are thinking about. Sometimes it even seems to call out to you.

Then an odd thing happens. Somehow you find you are starting to crave it. More than when you weren't avoiding it. You start to feel out-of-control around sugar. You begin to think you need a diet, or diet surveillance group, to get you through the day.

By setting up rigid parameters to keep yourself on track with eating, you have become out-of-control. HOW DID THAT HAPPEN?

To understand, let's move away from the topic of food and consider the same scenerio with a less emotionally charged thing.

Consider a friend who avoids flying. Maybe she is afraid, maybe she dislikes it. What is the first thing she thinks of when she wins a trip to Hawaii? "Oh, no, I can't go if I have to fly." She spends all her time thinking about the thing she has avoided. Will she have to fly, is there another way to get there, can she cancel the trip, can she get some Xanax?

Now consider a friend who doesn't love flying, nor does she hate it. Sometimes its fun, mostly its neutral. She wins a trip to Hawaii. And she spends her time thinking about who she is taking with her and what beach they will be visiting.

Who thinks about flying the most? The person who is trying to avoid it!

The same thing happens with food. The more you try to avoid it, the more you think about it. Maybe not today, but eventually.

And there are additional problems with these rigid divisions of good/bad, healthy/unhealthy, and/or legal/illegal food. When you label a food, you instantly suppress the natural flow of information coming back from the body.

Your body regularly sends rich and complex messages back to you about the food you choose, and the quantity you eat. But you cant hear it because you are caught up in mental calculations of the damage the food is doing.

For example, 12 year old Elisa eats 15 homemade chocolate chip cookies then complains hat her stomach hurts. Her mother may say, "Eating that many cookies is bad for you, no wonder your stomach hurts." The message: "That was a bad thing to do." Often interpreted as "I am bad for doing that." Which often results in eating more cookies to feel better.

What if her mother said, "Yes your stomach is hurting, that's natural when you put so many cookies into it." The nonjudgmental message: "It's natural for my stomach to hurt with so many cookies." Elisa is affirmed, and since there was no "bad", no guilt, she is free to decide if she again wants to eat so much her stomach hurts. She probably won't.

Moralization around foods stops the feedback process. And that same feedback process is crucial for self-awareness. And it is nonjudgmental self-awareness that will bring you self-control.

Yes, food can have both positive and negative impact on your health. Some foods have more health benefits than others. Some can detract from health when eaten in quantity. But dividing foods into good and bad is not making Americans eat healthier.

Consider making all foods neutral, and begin to pay attention to your bodys feedback. Slow down and listen. Chances are you will get a subtle message when you eat junk food for lunch that that didnt feel so great. You will also get the message that having some birthday cake after dinner is not such a bad thing after all!
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Old 06-04-2014, 06:04 AM   #19
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Old 06-04-2014, 09:43 AM   #20
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Trying to navigate my way through doing intuitive eating plus keeping the fitness stuff plus gaining a few pounds back. What's normal for me these days is that I don't get hungry until around lunch time. If I eat a largish lunch, I'm full for the next 5-6 hours, then have dinner. That works okay for maintaining but not for gaining. To gain you have to increase portion sizes or at least increase the frequency of meals. Portion sizes are good where they are right now. I eat until I'm satisfied and starting to get full and occasionally I get to a bit too full. But I really dislike feeling stuffed, I'd rather stop at the point of being satisfied.

The fitness stuff just rocks my world. I was the most sedentary person I knew. We had this incredible gym membership and I never went. Last summer was filled with daily naps and lots of take out food. Total slugdom In the past week I've tried Zumba(love!) and this morning I did a Power Toning class and it hurts to walk and lifting anything above shoulder level is impossible but I did it! I'm walking outside and am taking baby steps in starting to run. There is a 5k in August that my daughter wants us to do together. My heart issues are mostly resolved and my blood pressure is perfect to low even with 1/2 of the standard dosage of my blood pressure medication. Holla!

So I'm going with more frequent meals. My goal will be 4 meals/snacks a day. The intuitive part will come in with my food choices. If I want a burger or a cupcake, I'll have it. I may post my meals here to help me keep track of my food and how it affects my energy level and weight. Good plan

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Old 06-04-2014, 11:29 AM   #21
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Welcome ladies

This is an article written years ago but a lot of us can relate to it.

*The Zen of Dieting*

I never met a diet I didn't like, and the more rules, the better. Some people go from therapy to therapy. I go from diet to diet. Low-fat, high-fat, cabbage soup, stone soup: I've lost weight on every food plan it la mode I've tried in the past decade. Most any type of diet will work for me 'cause I've got what it takes: discipline, zeal and an insane optimism. (This is the one!) At long last, I will conquer the lumpy pounds that stand between me and the size 10 trousers hanging in my closet. I visualize success: 1 am slim. I am powerful. I am woman.

Going on a diet is a great psychological tonic, delivering instant relief from the emotional conflicts of the moment. For example, once, after I quit a high-stress editing job that consumed my life for three years, I was rattling around the house, confused about what to do next. Look for a terrific new job that would impress my former colleagues? Write that long-awaited novel? Change careers and become a ... a ... what? My New Age friends suggested I sit tight and honor my confusion. As if. I decided to follow my heart. I went on a diet.

After all, dieting can fill pretty much any vacuum in a woman's life. There's the shopping, the cooking, the counting of nutritional components of every mouthful and, of course, the week's grand finale: getting on the scale. This single act can override any confusion you are having about whether or not you're meeting your life's goals. If the scale says you lost, you're a winner. If you've gained, you know what you are.

Don't tell me that diets don't work. The only complaint I have is that they don't work for long (let alone forever). Truth be told, I've been experiencing a certain diet burnout. I've been searching for my next diet, but nothing piques my interest. It's kind of a "been there, done that" feeling.

This slackening of zeal I blame on meditation. Learning to meditate offered me an opportunity to obsess about something else. It took me a good week to figure out how to create a 20-minute oasis for myself every morning. But once I'd settled on a spot to sit and convinced my husband that no matter how fascinating the story he just heard on the morning news was, it could wait. Then something happened. I got hooked. Those 20 minutes every morning have become the best part of my day.

As I continue to meditate, its seditious influence only grows. Taking those few minutes each day to view myself as part of the cosmos has encouraged living in the clear-sighted "now" that little sliver of reality that sometimes peeks through all the regrets and intentions that occupy my thoughts.

And it's very hard to diet in the "now." Dieting is about the future--scarfing down an entire bucket of salty peanuts today because tomorrow, for absolutely certain, absolutely, I'm going on the Not-One-Peanut-Ever Diet.

With the zeal of a new convert, I decided to change my approach to eating. I would learn to love and accept the total diet experience--both the losing the weight (sex appeal! soy products! sacrifice!) and the gaining (fries! French toast! freedom!).

It was this insight that finally led to the invention of my latest food program. It's based on my new belief that you can eat mostly healthful foods most of the time, but you can't eat all healthful foods all of the time. Sure, most of the time I keep an eye on calories, fat grams and green, orange, red and yellows. But human situations--and moods--are variable, and sometimes there's a need to disregard the sensible. On those days, the wine flows like bottled water. Starches `R' Us. Sweets Are Love. Crunch as You Go. Eat It All. But because I now see this as a treat, or a consolation but not self-flagellation--I stop eating just short of a stomachache.

I call this the Good Enough Diet. Whatever I ate yesterday, it was good enough. I smile at myself in the mirror, whether or not the panty lines are showing through those size 10 trousers. Because I know this is the one!
Love this! Will you post it in my journal, too, so I can access it easily? Thanks!
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Old 06-04-2014, 01:39 PM   #22
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Joanna, after I read your post on CaliChris' journal, I watched a 2009 talk at Google that Bethenny Frankel did. It was very interesting. I even sat through the real housewives talk even though I had NO idea who/what any of it was about. She's very engaging.
I checked out Gillian's blog and read some of her articles. I'm such a babe in woods about all this. But it's nice to know how much more there is to know, IYKWIM.

-Stephanie
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Old 06-04-2014, 02:24 PM   #23
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CC - I'd be happy to repost it.

Stephanie - Bethenny got a lot of flack for some of the ideas in her book. One thing she said was to taste everything and eat nothing. People flipped out and she got some pretty hostile book reviews. She was giving a strategy for attending a social function. Have a taste of everything as opposed to filling up and plate(or two). I agree that she is very engaging.

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Old 06-04-2014, 02:27 PM   #24
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Whoops. Posted twice. Perhaps because my 5 year old is next to me telling me that her plastic carrot has the sniffles and needs soup and rest.

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Old 06-05-2014, 06:34 AM   #25
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Old 06-05-2014, 06:52 AM   #26
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You are the sum of your choices

My brother is 55 years old. He's been happily married for 30 years. He's been a Buddhist for over 20 years. Practices martial arts. Healthy and strong. Zero health problems.

My sister will be 57 in July. She was diagnosed with gestational diabetes 20 years ago. It improved when she managed her diet and required medication when she didn't. She's been an insulin dependent Type 2 diabetic for 15 years. Eats whatever the hell she wants. Exercised never. Smoker for 30+ years. In December when I was managing a broken ankle and was taking steps to improve my life, she ended up back in the hospital where they determined she had to have her leg amputated below the knee. In April when the infection in her affected leg would't heal, they admitted her again and did an above the knee amputation. Every health problem imaginable.

I love my sister. I've been talking to her about her diet and health and choices for 20 years.
I am 12 years younger but I've played the big sister role for all of my adult life.

I have lived somewhere in between the two. I smoked but quit. I was sedentary but now embrace fitness as a daily expression of loving myself. I was 50 pounds heavier for years of my life but now have a perfect BMI. My blood pressure was high even with meds and now I'm on my way to becoming med free. We are the sum of our choices. There are acts of fate that happen that are beyond our control...but we always can control what we do in response to the bad things that happen in our lives.
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Old 06-05-2014, 11:28 AM   #27
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CC - I'd be happy to repost it.

Stephanie - Bethenny got a lot of flack for some of the ideas in her book. One thing she said was to taste everything and eat nothing. People flipped out and she got some pretty hostile book reviews. She was giving a strategy for attending a social function. Have a taste of everything as opposed to filling up and plate(or two). I agree that she is very engaging.
I saw some reviews on Amazon that accused her of promoting anorexia. However, it is pretty obvious that is BS. Anyway, tasting everything but "eating nothing" in the sense of not taking more than a taste of any one thing is pretty much how I deal with parties and buffets. Did it last night. Worked fine, as usual.
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Old 06-05-2014, 01:59 PM   #28
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Joanna, I just finished reading your journal. Thanks so much for posting this and letting us share in everything you have learned, and what you're still learning. I love that you lost your weight with IF and are maintaining with IE. Since I'm trying to combine the two and am feeling pretty happy with it most of the time, I'm highly encouraged. You look fantastic, BTW!

Your observations about you and your siblings is very telling. I'm so sorry your sister doesn't have the strength or wish to take good care of herself. I've known several people like that too, and their decline is so painful to watch. I'm not saying I am, and certainly have not been the most health conscious person. I am focusing more on it now than I ever have, and truly enjoy feeling good. I wish that for everyone!
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Old 06-06-2014, 06:45 AM   #29
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Thank you Carol for your kind words
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Old 06-06-2014, 06:46 AM   #30
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Ditching the scales

Why You Should Throw Away Your Scale - fANNEtastic food | Washington D.C. area Registered Dietitian | Recipes + Healthy Living + Fitness
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