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Old 06-22-2009, 12:17 PM   #1
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Anyone using Chromium and/or L-glutamine to stop cravings?

Hello everyone.

Is anyone using L-glutamine and/or chromium to help curb cravings? I've heard alot about the great combination but am wondering what the correct dosage for success is.

Thanks in advance for your responses.
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Old 06-22-2009, 07:43 PM   #2
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I found this in an old posting..very interesting. Is anyone out there currently taking Chromium? What results are you getting?

Chromium must be converted to a biologically active form for physiological function. Glucose tolerance factor (GTF), a biologically active form isolated from brewer's yeast, contains chromium (III), nicotinic acid, and the amino acids glycine, glutamic acid, and cysteine. GTF potentiates insulin's actions and therefore influences carbohydrate, lipid, and protein metabolism. It works with insulin to facilitate glucose uptake, regulate blood sugar levels, and stimulate protein synthesis.

The exact nature of the chromium-insulin interaction is unknown. Chromium may potentiate insulin action through direct action on insulin or its receptor, or it may regulate the synthesis of a molecule that potentiates insulin action. In clinical studies, GTF chromium has been shown to potentiate the effects of insulin and decrease serum cholesterol and triglycerides.

GTF (Glucose tolerance factor) is a molecule built around the mineral. Researchers developed chromium compounds that are more easily absorbed and utilized in the body (picolinate and polynicotinate, for example). Taken regularly, this trace mineral throws considerable therapeutic weight against the entire roster of problems caused or worsened by insulin resistance - including obesity, hypoglycemia, stroke, high blood pressure, Crohn's disease and colitis, ulcers, gastritis, multiple sclerosis, Meniere's disease, migraines, premenstrual tension, seizure disorders, and a host of psychiatric disturbances.

Chromium is indispensable for controlling noninsulin-dependent (Type II) diabetes. It may also benefit people who have the insulin-dependent (Type I) form of the condition.

Using 180 people from Beijing, China, who had Type II diabetes, Richard Anderson, Ph.D., from the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agriculture Research Service, proved that a daily 1,000 mcg (1 mg) dose of chromium picolinate could stabilize blood sugar in just two months. After four months of supplementation, they gained even stronger control of their blood glucose, insulin, and cholesterol.

Additional chromium is needed during pregnancy because the developing fetus increases demand for this mineral.

The average American diet is chromium deficient. Only one in ten Americans have an adequate amount of chromium in his or her diet.

High quantities of carbohydrates and sugar in the diet cause a loss of chromium from the body. When your body exhibits low levels of the trace mineral, your craving for sugars grows.

Even without dieting, chromium can increase your total lean body mass, which in turn speeds up your metabolism and burns additional fat.

Chromium helps to prevent the loss of lean muscle tissue if you intentionally cut back on calories.

A deficiency of chromium has also been associated with a higher chance of developing heart problems. Chromium helps raise the blood's concentration of artery-clearing HDL cholesterol and, at the same time, decreases LDL cholesterol and triglyceride levels. The reduction is even more impressive, researchers report, when a little niacin accompanies the chromium.

Chromium may alleviate chronic headaches and contribute to the treatment of acne, which appears to be caused in part by disturbed insulin metabolism.

Chromium makes bones strong by increasing DHEA levels, so it could figure into a treatment program for osteoporosis.

For obesity and other problems related to insulin resistance, the suggested daily dosage is 200-600 mcg; for full-blown diabetes or extreme obesity, 600 and 1,000 mcg per day.

Deficiency: Symptoms of chromium deficiency include glucose intolerance, elevated circulating insulin, glycosuria, fasting hyperglycemia, impaired growth, decreased longevity, elevated serum cholesterol and triglycerides, increased incidence of aortic plaques, peripheral neuropathy, brain disorders, decreased fertility and sperm count, negative nitrogen balance, and decreased respiratory quotient.

Children with protein-calorie malnutrition, diabetics, and older individuals may be especially susceptible to chromium deficiency.

Depleting Agents: The trend toward consuming highly processed foods may be a major contributing factor to this problem; appreciable losses of chromium occur in the refining of foods. Stressors such as elevated simple sugars, strenuous physical exercise or work, infection, and physical trauma may increase the loss of chromium, thereby increasing the need for chromium.

Sources: Chromium is found in the following food sources: beer, brewer's yeast, brown rice, cheese, meat, and whole grains. It may also be found in dried beans, blackstrap molasses, calf liver, chicken, corn and corn oil, dairy products, dried liver, dulse, eggs, mushrooms, and potatoes.

Herb Sources: Catnip, horsetail, licorice, nettle, oat straw, red clover, sarsaparilla, wild yam, and yarrow.

Precautions: If you suffer from low blood sugar you may experience symptoms of hypoglycemia if chromium is taken in excess.

Dosage Ranges and Duration of Administration: There are no RDAs established for chromium. The estimated safe and adequate daily dietary intakes of chromium are as follows:

Infants birth to 6 months: 10 to 40 mcg
Infants 6 to 12 months: 20 to 60 mcg
Children 1 to 3 years: 20 to 80 mcg
Children 4 to 6 years: 30 to 120 mcg
Children 7 to 10 years: 50 to 200 mcg
11+ years: 50 to 200 mcg
Dosage for disease prevention and treatment is typically 200 mcg chromium one to three times a day.

INTERACTIONS

Biguanide Antidiabetic Agents; Insulin Preparations; Sulfonylureas
A total of 115 patients with either Type I or Type II diabetes who were treated with chromium (200 mcg/day) required lower doses of insulin, sulfonylurea drugs, and metformin. The glycemic response to chromium treatment was greater for patients with Type II diabetes (57.2%). Chromium picolinate may benefit patients with Type II diabetes by increasing insulin sensitivity and stimulating insulin receptor sites.

Calcium Carbonate
Administration of 1 mL antacid suspension of calcium carbonate (150 mg) prior to treatment with 20 uCi 51chromium chloride minimized accumulation of chromium in the kidneys, testes, and spleen in male rats. These findings are supported by another study with female rats given antacid (40 mg) by gastric intubation (0.5 mL) followed orally by 55 uCi 51chromium chloride; chromium absorption was hindered by pretreatment with antacid.
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Old 06-24-2009, 08:53 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cdnhockeymom View Post
Hello everyone.

Is anyone using L-glutamine and/or chromium to help curb cravings? I've heard alot about the great combination but am wondering what the correct dosage for success is.

Thanks in advance for your responses.
Lots of people do.

More info, including dosages and timing can be found in this thread: Bad Cravings? Try this!
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Old 06-26-2009, 11:52 AM   #4
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Thanks for the link DiamondDeb
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Old 06-29-2009, 06:29 PM   #5
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I take both , and find that I have no cravings for sweets, and I love sweets.
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Old 09-20-2012, 04:36 PM   #6
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Chromium Picolinate and L-Glutamine

I just wanted to let everyone know that I have been taking these two supplements for a month and I find them to be very helpful. It has definitely curved my cravings for sweet, helped with my depression, and given me more energy. I feel so much better since taking these. I originally started taking them to minimize my carbohydrate cravings. I still crave carbohydrates but not nearly as much as before. I also don't feel hungry all the time and I eat much less now. I am very satisfied with these supplements. I would recommend them to everyone who suffer from carbohydrate and sweets addiction.
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Old 09-23-2012, 12:00 AM   #7
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Welcome, mvr2982!

I'm glad they are working so well for you! The combination of these two supplements have have many of us!
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