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-   -   Can Someone Help Me Interpret? (http://www.lowcarbfriends.com/bbs/thyroid/790679-can-someone-help-me-interpret.html)

MargD 12-04-2012 01:09 PM

Can Someone Help Me Interpret?
 
I paid for a blood test out-of-pocket, though Health Check USA because I was wondering if my difficulty losing weight was due to a thyroid problem.

The problem is that I have my results, but I'm confused as to how to interpret the results. Based on what I've read, my T4 seems okay, but my T3 is low. Can someone tell me if my results justify making a doctor appointment? My annual exam isn't until May of next year.

TSH004264 1.91 range is 0.450-4.500 uIU/mL
Triiodothyronine,Free,Serum010389 2.1 range is 2.0-4.4 pg/mL
T4,Free(Direct)019745 0.97 range is 0.76-1.46 ng/dL

watcher513 12-05-2012 08:16 PM

TSH004264 1.91 range is 0.450-4.500 uIU/mL

(FT3) Triiodothyronine,Free,Serum010389 2.1 range is 2.0-4.4 pg/mL

T4,Free(Direct)019745 0.97 range is 0.76-1.46 ng/dL


Well, I don't know how you Feel but if those were my results, I'd probably feel pretty bad. Many of us usually feel better if we're closer to 1.0 or under for TSH. Your FT3 is .1 above the Bottom of the range, that's Really low - midrange is 3.2. FT3 is our energy. Many people feel better when it's at least mid-range, if not higher. The FT4 is also low, mid-range is 1.11 for that range.

MargD 12-07-2012 08:55 AM

Thank you, Watcher. I have felt very low energy for the last few years, but have just come to accept it as normal, I think. I am often in bed by 9 or 9:30...my poor husband.

I made an appointment to discuss with my GYN a week from today. I guess I'll first have to explain how I had this done through Health Check USA. I hope he's at least heard of it.

watcher513 12-08-2012 03:10 AM

I get my own labs done through Healthcheckusa once in awhile because my HMO will not run a FT3 test and I take T3 along with T4 so I want to know what they are. It seems pretty necessary to me.

sasonnier 12-18-2012 09:05 AM

Hi- i was hoping that you guys could help me interpret my test results also- through healthcheckusa as well....

I dont' need you guys to tell me that my D is low:


Test Description
Vitamin D, results: 36.1; Range 30.0-100.0 ng/mL

The next one is where I could use some guidance:

Test Description
TSH004264 Result: 2.29; Range: 0.450-4.500 uIU/mL
Triiodothyronine,Free,Serum010389 Result: 2; Range: 2.0-4.4 pg/mL
T4,Free(Direct)019745 Result: 0.99; Range: 0.82-1.77 ng/dL

I'm assuming these are all on the lowish side??? does this mean that I could get some kind of treatment that might help me along?

sasonnier 12-18-2012 09:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MargD (Post 16122989)
Thank you, Watcher. I have felt very low energy for the last few years, but have just come to accept it as normal, I think. I am often in bed by 9 or 9:30...my poor husband.

I made an appointment to discuss with my GYN a week from today. I guess I'll first have to explain how I had this done through Health Check USA. I hope he's at least heard of it.

MargD- I know how you feel w/early bedtime---that's me to the nose! But I can't function after 7pm...in bed no later than 10. However, I was always a morning person.

I read the symptoms for poor thyroids on stopthemadness, and I fit into a majority of the symptoms. I really hope I'm able to get myself turned around here if my thyroids are turned around.

Leo41 12-18-2012 09:58 AM

Sophie-
The official 'cut off' for hypothyroid is a TSH of 3.0 or above. HOWEVER, most good thyroid doctors will treat someone like you with a TSH above 2.0 who also has symptoms. The key is 'good' thyroid doctor--they are hard to find.

To give some background for why doctors can be difficult about thyroid--they are 'monitored' by insurance companies, and a doctor who prescribes outside of the 'official' parameters can get into trouble with the AMA.

The problem is that insurance companies want to adhere exactly to numbers and consider only TSH. A good thyroid doctor understands that a person's lab results often don't reflect the actual condition of the thyroid. I was initially diagnosed with 'normal seeming' labs--which my endo said is very common and called 'sub-clinical hypothyroidism.' At the time, I had very severe symptoms. I was fortunate to find a good endo because my primary doctor had told me for over 5 years that I was 'fine,' although my symptoms constantly progressed. He attributed it all to 'normal aging.'

That's another problem with thyroid diagnosis. Since the symptoms vary by individual and are often 'vague' when reported to a doctor--e.g., my major symptom was crushing fatigue, which I knew was not normal for me. But he saw an overweight, menopausal woman and just assumed that I was more 'tired' than I was used to being because of my weight and age. Hence, doctors tend to ignore symptoms and rely on labs.

sasonnier 12-18-2012 11:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Leo41 (Post 16142029)
Sophie-
The official 'cut off' for hypothyroid is a TSH of 3.0 or above. HOWEVER, most good thyroid doctors will treat someone like you with a TSH above 2.0 who also has symptoms. The key is 'good' thyroid doctor--they are hard to find.

To give some background for why doctors can be difficult about thyroid--they are 'monitored' by insurance companies, and a doctor who prescribes outside of the 'official' parameters can get into trouble with the AMA.

The problem is that insurance companies want to adhere exactly to numbers and consider only TSH. A good thyroid doctor understands that a person's lab results often don't reflect the actual condition of the thyroid. I was initially diagnosed with 'normal seeming' labs--which my endo said is very common and called 'sub-clinical hypothyroidism.' At the time, I had very severe symptoms. I was fortunate to find a good endo because my primary doctor had told me for over 5 years that I was 'fine,' although my symptoms constantly progressed. He attributed it all to 'normal aging.'

That's another problem with thyroid diagnosis. Since the symptoms vary by individual and are often 'vague' when reported to a doctor--e.g., my major symptom was crushing fatigue, which I knew was not normal for me. But he saw an overweight, menopausal woman and just assumed that I was more 'tired' than I was used to being because of my weight and age. Hence, doctors tend to ignore symptoms and rely on labs.

Thanks for your response! I found an Osteopathic Dr. who I hear looks beyond the "typical/normal range", so I'm hopeful that she will be a good person to start with.

Leo41 12-18-2012 12:03 PM

My experience with D.O.s has been very, very positive. I hope this is your answer!

sasonnier 12-18-2012 04:47 PM

Leo- thank you, i hope so too!

CarolynF 12-18-2012 06:13 PM

According to thyroid peeps..The T4 should be in the middle of the range and the T3 should be in the upper third..You probably do need some medication..I take Natur-throid which has both T3 and T4.


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