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Old 03-12-2012, 11:44 PM   #1
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Help Interpret My Thyroid Antibody Lab Results

I took recent thyroid antibody tests and need some help interpreting the data.

TPO Ab = 15; Normal Range 0-34
TG Ab < 20; Normal Range 0-40

Does my TPO antibody mean that I'm within the normal range, even though I tested positive? Does this mean that I do have a TPO antibody, though the level is considered normal?

Does my TG antibody number mean that I in fact don't have an antibody?

In either case, is it normal for people to test positve for antibodies yet not be considered hypothyroid? The antibody tests were conducted by Labcorp using Siemens' (DPC) ICMA Methodology.

I do have myriad hypothyroid symptoms (cold fingers, dry skin, constipation), though my blood results do not reflect it: TSH ~1; Free T3 ~2.9, and Free T4 ~ 1.2. I do have T2 diabetes and an autoimmune condition (Sjogren's), which are frequently linked to Hashimoto's.
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Old 03-13-2012, 03:01 AM   #2
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The antibody tests has nothing to do with diagnosing hypothyroidism; it determines whether a person's thyroid condition is autoimmune or not.

You didn't give the lab ranges for your T4 and T3 tests, but your TSH suggests that you're not hypothyroid. Do you have the ranges?

Thyroid symptoms are so vague that they can stem from a variety of other causes, but it's also true that many people experience symptoms when their lab work doesn't yet indicate hypo (that was my experience). You need a very good thyroid doctor to understand this; most doctors go entirely by the lab results.
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Old 03-13-2012, 08:02 AM   #3
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TPO is your Thyroid Paroxidase Antibody level. This is used to diagnose Grave’s Disease, which is a hyperactive thyroid, due to an autoimmune disorder. This is the exact opposite of hypo thyroid. However, you number is so low it is not an issue and has nothing to do with hypo.

Your TG level (Thyroglobulin) level indicates you are not producing antibodies, therefore, no hypo thyroid due to an autoimmune disorder.
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Old 03-13-2012, 08:43 PM   #4
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Why would you need the lab ranges for T4 and T3? I can easily tell if something is out of the range or not. And TSH does not, from my understanding, reliably tell if you're hypothyroid or not -- that's what many doctors believe, but that's not often the case because TSH will mask subclinical cases and also when the Free T3 level is low. It's a pituitary secretion anyway, believed to affect thyroid functioing but not always and not reliably.

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Originally Posted by Leo41 View Post
The antibody tests has nothing to do with diagnosing hypothyroidism; it determines whether a person's thyroid condition is autoimmune or not.

You didn't give the lab ranges for your T4 and T3 tests, but your TSH suggests that you're not hypothyroid. Do you have the ranges?
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Old 03-13-2012, 08:50 PM   #5
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It's not solely for Grave's. I researched at least that much before asking for the test from my endo and having my blood draw. While TPO antibodies may indicate Grave's hyperthyroidism in some, for the great majority the condition is indicative of Hashimoto's.

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Originally Posted by rainbow000 View Post
TPO is your Thyroid Paroxidase Antibody level. This is used to diagnose Grave’s Disease, which is a hyperactive thyroid, due to an autoimmune disorder. This is the exact opposite of hypo thyroid. However, you number is so low it is not an issue and has nothing to do with hypo. Your TG level (Thyroglobulin) level indicates you are not producing antibodies, therefore, no hypo thyroid due to an autoimmune disorder.
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Old 03-14-2012, 04:13 AM   #6
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You may be able to tell when your T3 or T4 is 'out of range,' but you asked for an opinion and listed your T3 and T4 numbers, which we can't evaluate without knowing the lab ranges (which differ by lab). And it's not a question of being in or out of range--it's where on the range your are that's important for thyroid.

While the TSH is not determinative, no doctor would consider a TSH in the range of 1.0 as indicating any thyroid problem. That's the level that most of our doctors try to get us to in regulating our hypothyroidism. Most doctors will treat someone with symptoms whose TSH is 2.0 or above, although the recommendation is usually 3.0 or above.

Yes, TSH is a 'pituitary secretion,' but it stands for 'thyroid stimulating hormone,' and it indicates the amount needed for your thyroid to produce the appropriate level of hormones for your body. That's why it's such an important diagnostic tool for doctors considering thyroid problems. A 'sluggish' thyroid (hypo) needs far more stimulation than a normal one--thus the higher TSH indicating hypo.

Yes, there is 'subclinical' hypothyroidisnm where the lab numbers appear to be in the normal range, but the patient is experiencing symptoms indicating hypo. The problem is that hypo symptoms are relatively vague and can be attributed to a variety of other issues. That's why the doctor's diagnosis is key--i.e., only a physician can make a diagnosis when the condition is sub-clinical because other causes of the patient's symptoms have to be considered.
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Old 04-23-2013, 09:54 AM   #7
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Just got my THYROID PEROXIDASE AB test and it came in at 2730. How worried do I need to be?

Last edited by PixieDust1965; 04-23-2013 at 09:57 AM..
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Old 04-14-2014, 06:36 PM   #8
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I know this is an old thread, but I'm responding anyway. Pixie, my antibodies were as high as yours a few years ago. I was losing weight, I was shakey, I developed an intolerance to exercise and my resting heart rate was 120 (when it's usually 54). Turns out I was going through the hyperthyroid stage of silent thyroiditis, which is one of the autoimmune thyroid conditions. It usually starts out hyper, then goes into hypo. Many people completely recover, but I never did; I'm still in the hypo stage for which I take Synthroid. I'm thinking that since my antibodies were so high (like yours), my thyroid took a beating and that's why I never recovered. If you read this, I'd like to know how you're doing. I hope you've recovered, or at least on medication if necessary.
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