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-   -   Synthroid vs the generic type-pros, cons? (http://www.lowcarbfriends.com/bbs/thyroid/685694-synthroid-vs-generic-type-pros-cons.html)

ew1 08-03-2010 09:09 AM

Synthroid vs the generic type-pros, cons?
 
I am taking the 100 mg of Synthroid I had in my stash until I see the doc next week to get a refill rx. So if I go with the levoxythroid or whatever it's called, as a $ saving measure, am I missing anything by not taking the regular Synthroid?

watcher513 08-03-2010 11:22 AM

I do fine (that I know of) on Levothroid, lots of generic names, and generic T3 also.

Leo41 08-03-2010 12:01 PM

That's good to know, Watcher. I began Cytomel before the generic was available, and my insurance company now really extorts for the non-generic, but I've been afraid to mess with my T3 by switching to the generic. I may do it now (my pharmacist also told me that he has several people who switched to generic T3 with no problems).

lisabinil 08-03-2010 12:05 PM

I was told by both my endo and PCP they prefer me to take brand name Synthroid instead of the generic. The reason being pharmacies are constantly switching brands to get the cheapest price and the amount of actual T4 can vary per brand by 40%. So if you are taking the generic Synthroid it's possible you won't have the same amount of incoming T4. They said generic Cytomel doesn't have this issue.

JRo 08-03-2010 06:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lisabinil (Post 13756123)
I was told by both my endo and PCP they prefer me to take brand name Synthroid instead of the generic. The reason being pharmacies are constantly switching brands to get the cheapest price and the amount of actual T4 can vary per brand by 40%. So if you are taking the generic Synthroid it's possible you won't have the same amount of incoming T4. They said generic Cytomel doesn't have this issue.

that's so disturbing.

mimers 08-03-2010 07:14 PM

Re: generic Cytomel not having the issue...the issue with Cytomel and it's generic is that the generic is supposedly 70% cellulose. Those of us that didn't go well on Armour, need the "brand name" Cytomel.

watcher513 08-04-2010 01:16 AM

Mimers, that's good to know for those people.

lisabinil 08-04-2010 06:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mimers (Post 13757445)
Re: generic Cytomel not having the issue...the issue with Cytomel and it's generic is that the generic is supposedly 70% cellulose. Those of us that didn't go well on Armour, need the "brand name" Cytomel.


That is weird because I didn't do well on the Armour but do fine with generic Cytomel. Must have not been a cellulose issue for me.

mimers 08-04-2010 08:37 AM

Lisa...makes you wonder about the amount of T3 they put in things (or don't!!!) due to Pam's little testing done on her NDT, doesn't it!!! I know that Cytomel works for me...and all the NDT that used cellulose were not good...and either was compounded until she changed out the Avicel for dextrose. Cellulose is not my friend......

watcher513 08-04-2010 01:36 PM

If you know you don't have a reaction to the fillers (I know, how do we know without trying it?), try the generic for one prescription and see how it goes. On the liothyronine (T3) I'm sure you'd know pretty much the first couple of days. T4 generic may take a little long, I'm not sure.

Augirl 08-07-2010 12:57 PM

I did not do well on reformulated Armour--did nothing for me and my labs tanked--but I am doing very well on generic for synthroid and generic for cytomel. :stars: I recently had a friend have the same trouble with the reformulated Armour here, and I really wonder if, like Pam, the meds did not have the appropriate T3 (both of us clearly need the T3)? I am on levothyroxine (T4) and liothyronine (T3), and so far so good. :D

:heart: Lisa

KeirasMom 12-26-2012 12:15 PM

Bumping to see if anyone has any new input. I wasn't feeling well on generic, so my endo had me try name brand Synthroid for 6 weeks and I felt better. I'm out of the name brand, so went back to my generic for the last few days and I feel a little more fatigued. I'm wondering if anyone else really notices a difference. I was also out of town for the last few days and may just be fatigued from Disneyland! :D It's pretty soon for me to be noticing a difference.

Leo41 12-27-2012 03:16 AM

It all depends on what works for YOU. For example, I have been on Levoxyl from the time I was diagnosed (6-7 years), and no problems. One time, my pharmacist insisted on filling it with Levothyroxine--which he and my insurance company insist is the 'exactly the same'--but cheaper. I felt awful within a month, and my endo told me to insist on Levoxyl and that there is no such thing as an identical med. They all have different fillers, etc.

I began Cytomel before there was a generic, and do great with it. But my insurance company charges a fortune for it now that there's a generic, and I decided to try it. It was a disaster, and again my endo told me to go back onto brand Cytomel--and I'm happy to pay extra for feeling fine now.

I think all of us will have different 'stories' of what works for us, but what's important is to know that there are a variety of choices that your doctor can prescribe if one or the other isn't working well for you.

KeirasMom 01-08-2013 09:10 AM

My hands started cracking again from dry skin as well, so I ended up asking the doctor to prescribe the brand name. I picked it up yesterday, so I'm hoping to see some improvements again.

hot-in-texas 01-08-2013 12:46 PM

I am on Armour, I have no thyroid because it was removed, and my doctor wants me to be on Synthroid, but says I don't need to be on Cytomel with Synthroid and won't prescribe the cytomel, so I guess I will stay on armour

Leo41 01-08-2013 02:00 PM

Texas-
You may not need Cytomel (T3). It all depends on whether or not your body converts from T4--as it is supposed to do. I have a friend whose thyroid was surgically removed 10 years ago, and he thrives on just Synthroid.

I have Hashimoto's, and my endo says that conversion problems are 'characteristic' of that disease. I did fine without Cytomel for the first 5 years after diagnosis, but then I began to have those conversion problems.

hot-in-texas 01-08-2013 10:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Leo41 (Post 16181686)
Texas-
You may not need Cytomel (T3). It all depends on whether or not your body converts from T4--as it is supposed to do. I have a friend whose thyroid was surgically removed 10 years ago, and he thrives on just Synthroid.

I have Hashimoto's, and my endo says that conversion problems are 'characteristic' of that disease. I did fine without Cytomel for the first 5 years after diagnosis, but then I began to have those conversion problems.

Thanks Leo. I think I do better on the t3 t4 combo. I see most on here take synthroid, is that what you all would recommend?

hot-in-texas 01-08-2013 10:59 PM

Leo, I saw that u lost a lot of weight and you did calorie cycling. What is that?

Leo41 01-09-2013 02:10 AM

Texas- I am very carb sensitive, so I eat low carb--always. But because I'm also post-menopausal (slower metabolism) and hypothyroid (slower metabolism) and have what my endo calls a 'genetically slow metabolism' to begin with, I need to eat very low calorie. When I got down to about 250 lbs, I realized that I could not lose unless I restricted myself to <1000 cal a day (which my endo agreed as about right for me).

Trying to limit myself to 1,000 cal a day was very frustrating and led to periodic overeating--and no weight loss. So I began 'cycling'--eating 400 cal one day and 1400 the next day so that I averaged 900 cal a day.

Now in maintenance, I really can't eat more than 1,100 cal without gaining (my very slow metabolism), so I still cycle but not as rigorously. From eating at this level for so long, I find that 1,100 is fairly comfortable, so I only do one or two low days a week if I can keep the other days at 1200 or below.

Ironically, although my caloric level may seem extreme to 'normal' people, my body really doesn't require any more food. It's my 'head' that often wants to feed it more.

hot-in-texas 01-09-2013 09:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Leo41 (Post 16182558)
Texas- I am very carb sensitive, so I eat low carb--always. But because I'm also post-menopausal (slower metabolism) and hypothyroid (slower metabolism) and have what my endo calls a 'genetically slow metabolism' to begin with, I need to eat very low calorie. When I got down to about 250 lbs, I realized that I could not lose unless I restricted myself to <1000 cal a day (which my endo agreed as about right for me).

Trying to limit myself to 1,000 cal a day was very frustrating and led to periodic overeating--and no weight loss. So I began 'cycling'--eating 400 cal one day and 1400 the next day so that I averaged 900 cal a day.

Now in maintenance, I really can't eat more than 1,100 cal without gaining (my very slow metabolism), so I still cycle but not as rigorously. From eating at this level for so long, I find that 1,100 is fairly comfortable, so I only do one or two low days a week if I can keep the other days at 1200 or below.

Ironically, although my caloric level may seem extreme to 'normal' people, my body really doesn't require any more food. It's my 'head' that often wants to feed it more.

that is extremely interesting and valuable inf-thanks!

KeirasMom 01-09-2013 12:40 PM

TX, I also calorie cycle a-la-JUDDD. It's great!

hot-in-texas 01-09-2013 04:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KeirasMom (Post 16183964)
TX, I also calorie cycle a-la-JUDDD. It's great!

Hmmmm, i am going to have to look at this JUDD thing. The 2 of you have had great success AND have hypothyroid, that is very impressive.


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