Low Carb Friends  
Netrition.com - Tools - Faces - Recipes - Home


Go Back   Low Carb Friends > Recipes and Menus > Low Carb Recipe Help & Suggestions
Register FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Forum Jump
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 02-07-2015, 03:16 PM   #1
ncredbird
Senior LCF Member
 
ncredbird's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Eastern Tennessee
Posts: 154
Gallery: ncredbird
Stats: 204/178/170
WOE: Atkins
Start Date: January 2014
Yes!!!! You can make LC SOURDOUGH Bread

Here is the report on my LC Sourdough Bread adventure! It worked beautifully! I have two loaves to prove it and my non LC husband is happily eating his way through two pieces as I type. Beside the fact that I am doing LC he is pre diabetic so this will be our bread from this point forward. We both love it and even if you don't do the fermentation process it should turn out beautifully.


* Exported from MasterCook *

Ann's LC Sour Dough Bread first baking

Recipe By :
Serving Size : 16 Preparation Time :0:00
Categories : Bread, Yeast

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
1 cup water -- (100-110°F)
1/4 cup sourdough starter -- at room temperature
3/4 cup vital wheat gluten
1/4 cup oat fiber
1/4 cup soy flour -- I didn't have any of this on hand so used soy protein isolate instead
1/2 cup almond meal -- or almond flour
1/4 cup flax seed meal
1/4 cup wheat bran -- coarse unprocessed
1/2 package dry yeast -- Rapid Rise/Highly Active, or 1 1/8 teaspoon
1/2 teaspoon sugar -- up to 1 teaspoon would be fine - it will all be consumed by the yeast
1 1/2 tablespoons olive oil
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon Splenda -- or other sweeter of choice

Make the sour dough starter: Make your starter by mixing 1 cup of Einkorn wheat flour, 1 cup warm water (100 to 110 degrees F.), and 1 teaspoon yeast into a glass quart jar or other non metal container. (It needs to be quite large to prevent it from growing out of it's container) Stir with a wooden or plastic spoon but do not use metal. Cover loosely and store in a dark place (I put mine in the cupboard). Allow to sit and ferment until desired sourness is achieved. (I let mine ferment for 2 days but will probably increase to 4 days next time)

Next step: Stir starter well with non metal spoon. Remove 1/4 cup and set aside for bread making. Feed remaining starter by mixing 1/4 cup Einkorn wheat flour and 1/4 cup water, cover loosely, and store in fridge. (Be sure when using in the future to allow your starter to come to room temp before combining with warm ingrediets)

Combine vital wheat gluten, oat fiber, soy flour, almond meal, flax seed meal, and wheat bran together mixing well. Take half of the mixed ingredients and add to 1/2 cup warm water and add the 1/4 starter that you previously set aside. Mix well. Place in a loosely covered glass or plastic container and set in the cupboard for 24-48 hours. Save the other half of the mixed ingredients until bread making day.

When ready to make the bread: Add olive oil to the wet mixture. I placed the wet mixture into my Bosch mixer fitted with dough hooks. Combine the yeast, salt, and Splenda with the saved mixed dry ingredients distributing well. Turn on your mixer and slowly add these dry ingredients until well combined. I let it knead for 6 minutes. ( I would guess that at this point you could have simply added all these ingredients to a bread maker but I haven't tried this recipe in the bread maker yet. I would use a whole grain/wheat cycle or one about 4 hours long)

I do not do a double rise. I form into a loaf by pouring some olive oil on my kitchen counter and distributing it lightly over my work surface. Then I remove the dough from the mixer, flop it down, turn it over to coat slightly with oil, and form it into a smooth cylindar. Turn it into a well greased standard sized loaf pan (not an extra large one). I put some water into the microwave and boil it for a minute or two to make a nice moist warm environment to raise the bread. Place loaf pan into the microwave with the remaining bowl of warm water and allow to sit to raise (with the microwave NOT running) for about 1 hour or until the dough rises above the top of the pan. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Bake for 1 hour or until internal temp reaches about 200 degrees. (Whole wheat bread is done when it reaches between 195-205 deg F. I got nervous when it hit 197 degrees and removed it. It is nice and moist but next time I am going to try and be more patient and wait until 200 degress is met.) Allow bread to sit in pan for about 5 minutes and then remove to cool on a rack. The crust will be thick and crisp at this point. If you like it like that leave it alone. We prefer ours thin and moist so I use a basting brush dipped in some water and paint across the top of the loaf. This will soften the crust. Slice and enjoy!

The sugar will totally consumed by the yeast and does not contribute to the carb count although the figures below do contain the carbs that it would contribute as I didn't know how to remove it from my MasterCook figures.

Makes 16 slices. Per Serving: 73 Calories; 8g Fat (60.5% calories from fat); 6g Protein; 6g Carbohydrate; 4g Dietary Fiber; 0mg Cholesterol; 67mg Sodium.

It has a nice nutty taste with a slightly sour note on the sides of the tongue. I will ferment longer the next time to increase the tang or add 1 T. white vinegar. Bread is moist and toasts well although it took two cycles through our toaster set at the usual setting to get it brown. The loaf in the back had caraway, dill, and onion powder added which accounts for the difference in color. We haven't cut into that one yet.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg IMG_1400.JPG (51.0 KB, 29 views)
File Type: jpg IMG_1401.jpg (47.4 KB, 23 views)
File Type: jpg IMG_1402.jpg (40.5 KB, 21 views)
File Type: jpg IMG_1403.jpg (45.3 KB, 22 views)
File Type: jpg IMG_1405.jpg (52.5 KB, 43 views)
File Type: jpg IMG_1406.jpg (35.3 KB, 27 views)

Last edited by ncredbird; 02-07-2015 at 03:20 PM.. Reason: Comment
ncredbird is offline   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old 02-07-2015, 04:36 PM   #2
Barbo
Very Gabby LCF Member!!!
 
Barbo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Southern Ca. San Juan Capistrano
Posts: 4,239
Gallery: Barbo
Stats: 225/145/136
WOE: Low Carb Diabetic Plan
Start Date: August 2005
Hey Rdbird,
I think you did a very nice job here.
Thanks for your work and all the great pictures.
__________________
BARBOS LOWCARB kITCHEN
Barbo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2015, 04:46 PM   #3
Soobee
Very Gabby LCF Member!!!
 
Soobee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 4,715
Gallery: Soobee
WOE: Atkins
Start Date: September 2000
What beautiful loaves!
Soobee is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2015, 05:39 PM   #4
Charski
Gadget Gal
 
Charski's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 23,508
Gallery: Charski
Start Date: May 2003
Those loaves look great and the crumb is nice and even. Good job!
__________________
It's easy to be miserable. Being happy takes more work. ~~from Ondine, the movie~~

Veni, vidi, velcro - I came, I saw, I stuck.

I reject your reality and substitute my own! ~~ Adam on Mythbusters
Charski is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2015, 06:07 PM   #5
Bonbon41
Senior LCF Member
 
Bonbon41's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Way out west near the ocean
Posts: 957
Gallery: Bonbon41
WOE: Low carb cake plan!
Start Date: 2001
High five Redbird! So glad your careful planning and experimentation paid off. Those loaves are stunning.
Bonbon41 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2015, 06:28 PM   #6
Tweaker Geek
Very Gabby LCF Member!!!
 
Tweaker Geek's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: USA
Posts: 3,150
Gallery: Tweaker Geek
That bread looks wonderful, thanks for sharing, Redbird. I've copied your recipe to try sometime.
__________________
HAPPY TO BE A LOW-CARBER!

2015--Recipe for Success: Plan! Certainty of Success: Follow Plan!
Note to self: Ya gotta stick with the plan!!
Tweaker Geek is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2015, 11:37 AM   #7
rosethorns
Blabbermouth!!!
 
rosethorns's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Puyallup. WA
Posts: 5,526
Gallery: rosethorns
Stats: 252/140/150
WOE: atkins I eat non allergic food
Start Date: restarted 1-07
This is really great!!! My DH is now getting older and he would love this.I have reg. flour sour dough starter. May I use that?? He has quit sugar. This would only be for him , I can't eat grains. The only thing I don't have is soy flour.
__________________
______________________________
Esther

May we all live our life as long as we want!
rosethorns is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2015, 11:58 AM   #8
ncredbird
Senior LCF Member
 
ncredbird's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Eastern Tennessee
Posts: 154
Gallery: ncredbird
Stats: 204/178/170
WOE: Atkins
Start Date: January 2014
I would think that regular sour dough starter would work just as well. Einkorn is the only grain I keep in the house so that is what I used. There isn't a significant difference if any in carb count between the Einkorn which is non GMO and any other wheat. I didn't have enough soy flour in the house either but did have some soy protein isolate that won't be used for anything else so decided to see if that would work. Got lucky that it did. You might try some more of the oat fiber as that wouldn't change the final carb count. Let us know how it turns out.
ncredbird is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2015, 12:50 PM   #9
SpikersMom
Major LCF Poster!
 
SpikersMom's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 1,001
Gallery: SpikersMom
Stats: 180 highest ever/161/145
WOE: limit AS/Fung fasting/being mindful
Start Date: 6/27/2016
Hi Redbird - looks yummy! I am prediabetic too, and was hoping the einkorn flour would not be as "bad" as the usual whole wheat flour. Has your hubby tested his glucose to see how he reacts to it?

My local co-op sells the einkorn flour (and pasta, and wheatberries), but I'm nervous about trying any of it!

I miss bread more than anything else. Sourdough has always been my fav!
__________________
Nan
SpikersMom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2015, 01:29 PM   #10
ncredbird
Senior LCF Member
 
ncredbird's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Eastern Tennessee
Posts: 154
Gallery: ncredbird
Stats: 204/178/170
WOE: Atkins
Start Date: January 2014
SpikersMom My husband doesn't check glucose as we have changed his diet substantially and he sees his doc frequently. Hasn't had any problems with progression from the "pre" diabetic stage. That being said I have eliminated all grains from our diet with the exception of the Einkorn wheat which is strictly done from the standpoint of it's not being GMO after reading the book "Wheat Belly". I only use it when there is no other option. Grains are the main contributors in the diet that spike blood sugar levels and we have found we can live without them. I would recommend this read to EVERYONE. We both have diabetes family histories and neither of us wants to end up there so are taking every precaution. Great thing is both of us have been able to stop taking our GERD medications since instituting this lifestyle change! The only reason I used any wheat at all is that I needed to grow the sourdough starter. There is only the equivalent of 2 T. of wheat in this recipe. You can use any type of wheat that you wish but they all have the same number of carbs per unit. There is a great video that someone sent me that I would recommend that you watch also but it is long, almost 40 min, about how foods effect not only the glucose index but also the glucose load. It can be viewed at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SzcOz38FjaU. Like you I missed bread more than everything else on LC. That, in concert with our health considerations, is why I wanted to find a good bread recipe to work with. I also know that the sour dough beasties eat up some of the carbs in the fermentation process but I can't account for how much of them. The carbs stated are the actual numbers associated with the ingredients in the recipe and does not allow for the decrease in possible carbs being consumed by the yeast. I have to assume that the final numbers would be less than stated but not sure how much less. I also have to assume that the longer the fermentation process the more of them would be consumed. Hope that answers your question.
ncredbird is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2015, 04:34 PM   #11
rosethorns
Blabbermouth!!!
 
rosethorns's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Puyallup. WA
Posts: 5,526
Gallery: rosethorns
Stats: 252/140/150
WOE: atkins I eat non allergic food
Start Date: restarted 1-07
I can get some Einkorn. Yes it is non GMO and has not been processed to death like the wheat in the store. He is coming closer to my side everyday.

Red Bird watch out for soy , it is a Gmo product. I have a plant based organic protein powder that I'm going to try in place of the soy.

I have not been able to eat grains for a long time, but i've been thinking about trying some Einkorn. I like how Peggy has been adding it into recipes a tablespoon at a time.

There are alot of foods that I couldn't eat and then I tried organic and I can eat them.Go figure.
__________________
______________________________
Esther

May we all live our life as long as we want!
rosethorns is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2015, 05:35 PM   #12
ncredbird
Senior LCF Member
 
ncredbird's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Eastern Tennessee
Posts: 154
Gallery: ncredbird
Stats: 204/178/170
WOE: Atkins
Start Date: January 2014
Let me know what you use in it's place and how it works out. I was attempting to get the carb count down as low as possible and did an analysis of each of the products I had on hand and chose the ones with the least amount of carbs. When I went to make it I realized I didn't have the soy flour after all but had some soy protein isolate that had been around for awhile so decided to use it instead. (I wasn't going to use it for anything else and wanted to use it up.) I do realize that soy is one of the most GMO manipulated food products available but in the process of becoming LC and not being able to eat other beans I have decided to allow for some soy in my life in the form of black soy beans primarily. We don't eat alot of them but there are a limited number of items I am willing to work with in order not to limit our diet to the point that it becomes unbearable. Beans are a deal breaker for DH so in order to keep the sugar values down that is the only available option that I have found so far. I would be willing to replace the soy flour in this recipe if we can find a suitable replacement. If you ever find a source for non GMO black soy beans be sure and let me know. I maintain if I went organic at this point in my life that I would probably go into withdrawl and have to go into rehab!

Last edited by ncredbird; 02-08-2015 at 05:38 PM..
ncredbird is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2015, 05:49 PM   #13
rosethorns
Blabbermouth!!!
 
rosethorns's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Puyallup. WA
Posts: 5,526
Gallery: rosethorns
Stats: 252/140/150
WOE: atkins I eat non allergic food
Start Date: restarted 1-07
Do you use Eden fron Netrition? I might try them, they are organic..You used soy protein isolate so I think the organic protein powder I have might work. I'll let you know. There are certain foods I have to eat organic or not eat them.
__________________
______________________________
Esther

May we all live our life as long as we want!
rosethorns is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2015, 06:03 PM   #14
ncredbird
Senior LCF Member
 
ncredbird's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Eastern Tennessee
Posts: 154
Gallery: ncredbird
Stats: 204/178/170
WOE: Atkins
Start Date: January 2014
I do use Eden Organic but get the canned at my local grocery store. I have also ordered a bag online of the dry beans which I cook and use in salads, as refried beans, in soups, and cooked and used in baked beans. When you cook the dry ones up you need to soak them overnight, drain, cover with a good amount of water, and put in the crock pot ALL DAY. Be sure to add about a teaspoon of baking soda which helps soften the texture or they will remain hard and don't add any other ingredients to them until after they become soft.
ncredbird is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2015, 06:13 PM   #15
rosethorns
Blabbermouth!!!
 
rosethorns's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Puyallup. WA
Posts: 5,526
Gallery: rosethorns
Stats: 252/140/150
WOE: atkins I eat non allergic food
Start Date: restarted 1-07
Do you get the canned Eden at your local grocer? I will try them first to see if I can handle them.


Wow thanks for the scoop on the dry beans. That helps alot.
__________________
______________________________
Esther

May we all live our life as long as we want!
rosethorns is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2015, 06:39 PM   #16
ncredbird
Senior LCF Member
 
ncredbird's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Eastern Tennessee
Posts: 154
Gallery: ncredbird
Stats: 204/178/170
WOE: Atkins
Start Date: January 2014
I do get them at one of the local grocers. They cost me about $2.79 each can but I wanted to try them first before ordering the dry beans (which are also Eden). Surprisingly I tried to find them while we were visiting the kids in Phoenix (a major metro area) to no avail, but here in our local community which is a very small rural farming community I could find them. You may have better luck trying at a Whole Foods or health food store if you have one close but that didn't work in Phoenix either. I think the Eden foods website has an availability locator if you check their site.
ncredbird is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2015, 09:22 AM   #17
rosethorns
Blabbermouth!!!
 
rosethorns's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Puyallup. WA
Posts: 5,526
Gallery: rosethorns
Stats: 252/140/150
WOE: atkins I eat non allergic food
Start Date: restarted 1-07
Thanks . We have co-ops here which are wonderful no HFS. I will proably find them there. I have to try them first also.
__________________
______________________________
Esther

May we all live our life as long as we want!
rosethorns is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2016, 07:29 PM   #18
EnglishLit
Senior LCF Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 577
Gallery: EnglishLit
I'm in the process of making carb friendly sourdough recipes and this thread has helped a lot! I successfully made a nice starter from einkorn flour and low carb flour and I plan to make my first loaf of sourdough tomorrow.

I also stumbled upon a very old, little known fermented bread recipe from Jenna Marie, called "Hearth Loaf", where essentially you made an autolyse from regular bread flour, and then add her low carb flour to the recipe. I made a version of this and the flavor was amazing, but it didn't get a very high rise so I'm going to continue to work on it and tweak.

At the moment, I'm taking a page from the THM diet and making a no knead fermented bread, but with half low carb flour, half whole wheat einkorn flour. It has doubled in size and looks really promising, but I still have another day to go before I can bake it off so we'll see.
EnglishLit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2016, 07:54 PM   #19
ncredbird
Senior LCF Member
 
ncredbird's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Eastern Tennessee
Posts: 154
Gallery: ncredbird
Stats: 204/178/170
WOE: Atkins
Start Date: January 2014
I looked up the Jenna Marie's recipe for the low carb flour blend and recipe. It calls for Jenna Marie products which I have never heard of. Have you ever tried to make it with non Jenna Marie products? Look forward to seeing pictures and the recipe if it works well.

Last edited by ncredbird; 01-05-2016 at 08:03 PM..
ncredbird is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2016, 08:10 PM   #20
EnglishLit
Senior LCF Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 577
Gallery: EnglishLit
Jenna Marie was a low carb poster here and in the LC community about ten years ago, and she developed some really good LC flour blends that I use in most of my recipes. If you search here, you'll find recipes for both her cake flour blend and bread flour blend. I do keep Carbalose on hand for emergencies and I use Carbquik too, but I prefer her blend.

I have not tried to make any of it without the low carb flour blends, but I don't see why the fermented bread recipes wouldn't work with other low carb flours as long as you're using a bit of regular wheat flour in there recipes.
EnglishLit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-28-2017, 01:52 PM   #21
dianafoot
Major LCF Poster!
 
dianafoot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: southern US
Posts: 1,243
Gallery: dianafoot
I used to use Jena Marie's low carb flour blend often. You certainly don't need "her" flours, she just offered those flours for sale from her website. I bought all mine from Netrition. And yes, I made many wonderful things from her blends. I use Wayback Machine to access her archived recipes.
dianafoot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-28-2017, 07:00 PM   #22
EnglishLit
Senior LCF Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 577
Gallery: EnglishLit
Jenna Marie's hearth bread is the closest I've come to authentic low carb sourdough bread. I can eat regular sourdough bread these days, but it is definitely worth keeping a starter on hand and adding it to low carb flour mixes. Here's JM's recipe:
Jena Marie's Hearth Loaf - Serving Size : 1 large rustic loaf; Preparation Time : 5+ hours

Ingredients:

Dough Starter (Sponge)

1 cup unbleached bread flour (this is real bread flour)

1/4 cup whole wheat flour

3/8 teaspoon instant yeast

1 Tablespoon sugar

1 1/3 cup water, at room temperature (70 to 90 degrees F)

Flour Mixture

1 3/4 cup low carb flour blend

1/2 teaspoon instant yeast

1 1/2 teaspoon salt (do not add with the flour mixture)





1. Make the sponge.
In a mixer bowl or other large bowl, place all ingredients. Whisk until very smooth and to incorporate air. About 2 minutes. Whisking in the air is a very important step, so don't skip it. The sponge should be like a very thick batter. Scrape down the sides of the bowl and set aside, covered with plastic wrap, while you mix up the flour.

2. Flour Mixture
In a medium bowl, whisk only the JM Flour Blend and yeast. Gently scoop it onto the sponge to cover it completely. Cover bowl tightly with plastic wrap and allow to ferment from 1 to 4 hours at room temprature. The longer the fermentation time, the more sour the bread will be and the fewer carbohydrates it will have.

3. Mixing the dough.
Mixer Method - Using the dough hook, (#2 if using a KitchenAid) mix on low speed for about 1 minute until the dough is moist and has formed a rough dough. Scrape down sides and press any little bits into the dough. Cover and let sit for 20 minutes. This 20 minute rest is important because it give the gluten a chance to relax.

After the rest, sprinkle the salt on top of the dough and mix on medium speed (#4 on KitchenAid) for about 7 minutes. The dough should be elastic and smooth, but sticky to the touch. Add water a few drops at a time if needed. Towards the end of the mixing, you should listen for the "slap, slap, slap" noise made by the dough. Learn this sound because it is the sound the dough makes when it is ready for proofing.

Hand Method - Add the salt and with a wooden spoon or your hand, mix the batter until the flour is moistened. Knead the dough in the bowl until it comes together, then scrape it out onto a lightly floured counter. Knead the dough for 5 minutes, enough to develop the gluten structure and adding up to 2 tablespoons of JM Bread Flour Mix to keep it from sticking too much. This bread dough should be sticky, so resist the temptation to add more flour! Cover the dough ball with the bowl and allow it to rest for 20 minutes. This step must not be skipped. It allows the gluten to relax and the dough will be less sticky.

Knead the dough for another 5 or 10 minutes until it is very smooth and elastic. It should be just slightly sticky.

4. Letting the dough rise.
Both Methods - Using an oiled spatula or dough scraper, scrape the dough into a 2 quart bowl or container, lightly greased with oil, for the dough to rise. Spray the top of the dough with oil and cover with with a lid or plastic wrap. Allow the dough to rise (ideally at 75 to 80 degrees) until doubled, about 1 hour.

Using an oiled spatula or dough scraper, scrape the dough onto a floured counter (or on parchment or silpat and use no extra flour) Gently press the dough down and either shape it and place in a greased loaf pan, or shape into a free form loaf on a parchment or silpat covered baking sheet. I make mine into a round loaf about 2-3 inches high and 8 inches in diameter. Spray the top with oil and cover well with oiled plastic wrap. Let loaf rise until doubled, about 45 minutes.

5. Preheat the oven.
Preheat the oven to 475 degrees 1 hour before baking. Place the oven shelf at the lowest level and place a baking stone or heavy baking sheet on it before pre heating.

6. Slash the dough and bake.
With a razor or sharp knife, slash the top of the loaf about 1/2 inch deep. For a traditional loaf slash right down the middle. For a round artisian loaf, slash a tic-tac-toe type of mark on top. Mist the top of the bread. This will give a thicker, crisper crust. Place in the oven and bake for 10 minutes. Lower the temprature to 425 degrees and bake until the internal temprature is 200 degrees. (use an instant read thermometer and insert into the center) This should take an additional 20 minutes or so.

7. Cool the bread. Remove bread from pan and cool on a wire rack until it is cooled completely.
EnglishLit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-29-2017, 10:13 AM   #23
Pam
Senior LCF Member
 
Pam's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Indiana
Posts: 801
Gallery: Pam
Stats: 181/148/145
WOE: moderate carbs
Start Date: March 2001
Quote:
Originally Posted by rosethorns View Post
You used soy protein isolate so I think the organic protein powder I have might work. I'll let you know. There are certain foods I have to eat organic or not eat them.
Did you ever make this bread subbing the organic protein powder?
__________________
Pam
Pam is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-30-2017, 07:03 AM   #24
RexsreineSC
Senior LCF Member
 
RexsreineSC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Aiken, SC
Posts: 349
Gallery: RexsreineSC
WOE: LC, lower fat, higher protein
Start Date: off and on for ten years
Remember Sourdough Saga???

W-a-a-a-a-y back in February/March of 2007 I was on a sourdough bread kick.

I developed a few recipes for low carb SD bread, using an old starter I'd been nurturing. Unfortunately for me now, this bread - which was very, very good- contained a lot of the wheat protein isolates and Carbalose. I don't eat those anymore.

If you do eat the above ingredients, you can search for "Sourdough Saga". For reasons I don't understand, only chapter 7 comes up. i haven't spent enough time trying to find the first stages of this very long post.

A number of months ago, I tried making SD bread without the WPI and Carbalose. Edible, but just barely. No real SD flavor. My take-away from that latest experience is that you must have a fair amount of gluten for it to work.

I think Einkorn has possibilities. There are numerous SD Einkorn recipes floating around on the web. Believe I will try that next.

Ginny in Aiken, SC
RexsreineSC is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 01:37 PM.


Copyright ©1999-2017 Netrition, Inc. All rights reserved. - Terms of Service | Privacy Policy
LowCarbFriends® is a registered mark of Netrition, Inc.