Low Carb Friends  
Netrition.com - Tools - Faces - Recipes - Home


Go Back   Low Carb Friends > Main Lowcarb Lobby
Register FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Forum Jump
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 03-30-2012, 10:49 PM   #1
stellarexplorer
Senior LCF Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: New York
Posts: 90
Gallery: stellarexplorer
Stats: Male 6'-0" 193/167/170
WOE: no added sugar/ no starches
Start Date: March 21, 2012
On the Work of My New Nutrition Journey

This will seem naive, no doubt. How could it not be, as I have only been seriously grappling with idea of LC for a few weeks? And it has been only 9 days that I have eaten this way. Sorry if I am not as succinct as I would like to be. I'm trying to put something into words as I go along.

I am not trying to tell my eating story here. No, it's about the process of coming to beliefs about eating.

I have recognized my own trouble with carbs for a few years now. I limited grains, breads, even my bete noire, sweets, if I could (which was not as successful as I wished). I never followed this to its conclusion, even though I realized it on my own: So-called healthy foods -- foods I love -- fruits and vegetables: these have sugars too. I thought for a long time it was sufficient to eliminate what in the popular mind are considered carbs. So why couldn't I lose weight?

I started reading about the concept of carb intolerance and about seeing carbs as addictive substances.

I have a medical and scientific background -- and have always been something of a paleoanthropologist by avocation -- and yet could never parse the various nutritional points of view out there in the world.

I saw an expert on TV. He was saying things I had come to believe as I struggled with minor medical issues arising from being chronically 20 lbs overweight. That despite being an active, competitive athlete. I thought he was on to something when he talked about low carb eating.

As I pursued him, I came to feel he was right on the issues, but not an individual I fully trusted. He was trying to sell me something. It was hard to know where his point of view might be influenced by his own gain. I moved on.

I got to Steve Parker's book, The Advanced Mediterranean Diet: Lose Weight, Feel Better, Live Longer. Liked it. Made sense to me. Things were coming together. I will not review the arguments here, other than to note that insulin promotes fat deposition, and carbs raise insulin.

I started his ketogenic diet.

Then I started reading here, and elsewhere on the internet. Many LCers were doing Atkins. Never had read DANDR. Read it over the last few days. Hmm. Doesn't conflict with Parker, but has a broader pedagogical agenda, IMHO.

Then some folks here were kind enough to point me to Peter Attia's blog. This moved me a great deal.

As far as I am concerned, the issues raised -- choices affecting our health, well-being, and beyond ourselves the question of what large scale societal recommendations and policies ought to be adopted -- are vital. They are also quite complicated, and it can be hard to sort out the varied points of view of experts. People like Attia, in the trenches, doing experimental nutritional research, are a crucial part of establishing scientifically and verifiably what the nutritional facts really are.

I find myself a bit scared, because I see the path I am going down, and we're all kind of on our own in the decisions we make regarding food. I think I'm going onto a good path, but I hope I'm not missing something that could negatively affect my health. And I'm apprehensive too because the conclusions I am reaching will probably compel me to change so much that has been part of my life forever. It's not easy to turn your back on a way of life, even if it's hurting you. After all, that's your life. And the lives of almost everyone I know. It feels like I am walking my own path, away from the group, away from the collective wisdom, and that's scary. It requires both conviction and courage.

The more I read and learn, the more I move from where I started. And remember, this is over a fortnight, really. I have a strong feeling that where I am now is just the beginning of where I will be in terms of WOE and in terms of beliefs about eating.

You see I can't do this because of what anyone else says. Personal experiences are wonderful and have helped me here very much so far, but I need my own as well. And expert opinions are valuable, but I need to absorb the arguments and the data, so that I can proceed with conviction.

What to eat, how to eat, and why. Only now am I coming to see how much there is to think about (I was going to say digest! ). Belief, conviction, practice: these will be hard-earned for me. Or perhaps I should say hard-won.

Thanks for listening.
stellarexplorer is offline   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old 03-31-2012, 06:40 AM   #2
creseis
Senior LCF Member
 
creseis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Ancramdale, NY
Posts: 770
Gallery: creseis
Stats: 157/156/135
WOE: Atkins/Eades's/Volek and Phinney/Attia.. Ketogenic
Start Date: Jan 4, 2014
welcome to the dark side... definitely pick up a copy of Phinney and Volek's "The Art and Science of Low Carb Living"--it goes deeper into the biochemistry of low carbing than any other source.
creseis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2012, 07:43 AM   #3
LiterateGriffin
Major LCF Poster!
 
LiterateGriffin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Jacksonville, FL
Posts: 1,716
Gallery: LiterateGriffin
Stats: 236.5 start (Jan 2012) /210.8/150 goal 5'9", 44 yr
WOE: Atkins (though I think a fairly early version)
Start Date: Jan 6 2012
You have a medical/scientific background?

Then maybe this will help: . A member here shared the link earlier this week, and despite having become convinced that this was a healthy way to live YEARS ago, the hard facts in here were very enlightening. (It's a 1.5 hour talk given by a UC med school professor. However, it seems to be part of a series of presentations NOT aimed at med students, so though he does go into a lot of biochemistry, he explains in layman's terms at the same time.)

As my husband said after watching, "It's hard to argue with chemistry."

You're right: Adopting this sort of lifestyle is very much going against the "norm". And there is VERY little mainstream support -- even less than there was ten years ago. Most of the medical community has a knee-jerk reaction to the very idea of it... even though you can get many of those folks to accept the individual "steps" that lead to the conclusion we have all come to.

I'm not personally familiar with the particular plan you're on, so I can't address it specifically. I'm going to assume, however, that it, too, advocates cutting sugar, white flour, and other highly processed carbohydrates out, and getting what carbs you DO ingest from nutrient-dense foods.

I will tell you that the reason I went on a LC diet the FIRST time, in 2003, was NOT to lose weight. It was to address certain health issues I was having... which it did, wonderfully. The pounds and inches slipping away was just an added bonus. I feel BETTER when I eat this way. I do not like how I feel when I eat the way the USDA recommends. If I follow the USDA, I quickly end up nearly bedridden.

Again, that's a personal testimonial, which you're not looking for. And... I've got health issues you don't. My point is that I FIRMLY believe you will start experiencing similar changes (if, hopefully, not as extreme as mine). And when that happens, you'll start to KNOW -- not just intellectually or theoretically, but bone-deep -- that what you're doing is right for your body.

Welcome -- and enjoy your journey.
LiterateGriffin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2012, 08:08 AM   #4
clackley
Chatty Cathy
 
clackley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 13,775
Gallery: clackley
WOE: N.K.=vlc/moderate protein/high fat
Start Date: Restart Oct 18 2009
I think I know exactly what you are 'going through'. It was a paradigm shift for me. It took some time and lots of reading but I remember a distinct time where I came to realize, the things that made the most sense and had the most scientific evidence where the things that are contrary to 'conventional wisdom'.

If I were to pick out the singular and most powerful influence for me was the book Good Calories/Bad Calories by Gary Taubes. That was the tipping point for me. Since then, I have found a virtual mountain more of substantiating evidence.

I now think of myself as an 'early adapter' and that although this is counter to conventional thinking at the moment, it won't be for long.
__________________
Cathy
Original start - Feb. 2000 180/125

"The energy content of food (calories) matters, but it is less important than the metabolic effect of food on our body." Dr. P. Attia
“Eat animals. Mostly fat. Enjoy!
"I resist insulin" Hyperlipid
We are butter together!
clackley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2012, 10:45 AM   #5
AllMyPonies
Senior LCF Member
 
AllMyPonies's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Where the West Begins, TX
Posts: 80
Gallery: AllMyPonies
Stats: Start 3/23-235/226.6/160
WOE: DANDR Induction, work out EVERY DAY!
Start Date: It's now or never...
Literate, thanks for posting the link!
AllMyPonies is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2012, 11:50 AM   #6
Dredaye9
Senior LCF Member
 
Dredaye9's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 545
Gallery: Dredaye9
Stats: 190/180/130
WOE: LC
Start Date: August2014
Very good post. Gary taubes book is also a good read. I'd suggest the 500 page one it's more scientific . Good calories bad calories. But yes there's nothing quite the same as experiencing it for yourself. I'm a skeptic as well but I know through ACTUAL RESULTS that this woe works, not just for weight loss but for overall well being and health . Go ahead and test the theory ... I have a feeling you' ll become a believer. And I'm not a salesperson ... Just a girl who's struggled with food/ weight her entire life. And please let us know how it's going. just don't try to argue LC to any medical " professionals" it's a loose- loose situation . Happy Saturday!!
- megs
__________________
Every lb gained is water/ every lb lost is fat
*****We are stronger than we know****
Dredaye9 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2012, 12:01 PM   #7
Jebber
Senior LCF Member
 
Jebber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 236
Gallery: Jebber
Stats: 183.6/175.2/135
WOE: Low Carb JUDDD
Start Date: 9/14/14
Very deep post stellaexplorer. Your fears are the exact reasons why I have strayed from this woe countless times. I succombed to well meaning family and friends when they told this woe is unhealthy. Where did that get me? Back to feeling tired, depressed, bloated and fatter than I had been each time. Oh and now my bp is high and my cholesterol is high. I had my cholesterol done several years ago after being on Atkins 9 months and my numbers were fantastic. The doc had never seen numbers so good.

That's why I'm making sure that I keep reading (and re-reading) the books. I do not want to get off track because I KNOW DARN WELL this is the woe for me.

Glad you put the question out there and are confronting this beast early.
Jebber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2012, 03:44 PM   #8
stellarexplorer
Senior LCF Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: New York
Posts: 90
Gallery: stellarexplorer
Stats: Male 6'-0" 193/167/170
WOE: no added sugar/ no starches
Start Date: March 21, 2012
Phinney and Volek: ordered!
Good Carbs bad Carbs: ordered!
Above video: on the docket -- thank you!

It's not that I am not convinced that low carb eating is helpful and will be helpful to me. I have been sympathetic since the 70s (when a college professor of mine introduced it) to the position that the diet our paleolithic forbearers ate may be the one to which our biology is best adapted.

And am convinced personally that I cannot continue to eat a lot of carbs and expect to control my weight and the creeping minor medical issues that have crept in. Mildly elevated fasting blood sugar. My internist seems to be just a shade away from calling it "prediabetes". LDL mildly elevated. Blood pressure mildly elevated. I'm a healthy active guy, and all the above are likely attributable to carrying around just a little more weight than my body can deal with, and the predictable cascade of biochemical events are following, like a shadow.

The theory and practice I have read so far is compelling. My 8 lb weight loss since I started 11 days ago is also encouraging. I've been to the letter as instructed. Normalization of my labs would be further encouragement.

One thing that I think is only fair is to read the best examples of an opposing point of view that are out there. Not something emotional with an ax to grind. There must be careful smart people out there who have articulated their objections to LC in a thoughtful way and in good faith. I'd like to find out what that literature is and consider it. Any ideas?

Finally, to be more specific about a few of my fears (and these are fears -- doesn't mean I believe them or that they are true):

1. Is it really true that eating a lot of animal fat will not promote arterial fat deposition if I am able to control my cholesterol and LDL?

2. Are there really no other chronic health consequences to LC eating that ought to be weighed against the clear benefits?

3. Could it really be true that all we've been told about the need for fruits and vegetables is wrong? Some claim that the fruits and vegetables we eat today have all been bred by humans over the last few thousand years. I well understand the case of corn/teosinte. No argument. Does this hold for all the other fruits and vegetables too? Need to find out.
Is it possible that some deviations from our paleolithic diet are actually beneficial and should be encouraged?
What about phytonutrients in fruits and vegetables? The studies that show health benefits are not of the experimental-Peter Attia type. They are retrospective survey studies, which are less powerful. And importantly, none of them is powerful enough to examine the issue in a LC environment.

And yet, intuitively, fruits and vegetables feel healthy. And friendly.

You see, I am afraid that this inquiry may lead me much further than I ever expected.

I don't know the answers yet, but I hope to have more as I learn ...

Thanks for the encouragement, guys!

Last edited by stellarexplorer; 03-31-2012 at 03:45 PM..
stellarexplorer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2012, 06:48 PM   #9
stellarexplorer
Senior LCF Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: New York
Posts: 90
Gallery: stellarexplorer
Stats: Male 6'-0" 193/167/170
WOE: no added sugar/ no starches
Start Date: March 21, 2012
And one more question, now that I watched the excellent video provided by LiterateGriffin (Thank you!) by Dr, Robert Lustig of UCSF, who makes the case against sugar and HFCS.

4. What exactly is the added benefit of a broad LC diet versus one that is less restrictive but allows for no fructose or sucrose?


Oh! BTW, my internist has been unable to figure out why I have one lone liver function abnormality: my ALT is very slightly above normal. All diagnostic tests to date have not clarified this.Dr. Lustig may have explained this. He conducted a study which looked at sugar consumption and showed an association between same and ALT elevation. Certainly provocative given my situation.

Last edited by stellarexplorer; 03-31-2012 at 06:52 PM..
stellarexplorer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2012, 02:17 AM   #10
watcher513
Major LCF Poster!
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Sonoma County, CA
Posts: 1,790
Gallery: watcher513
Dr. Michael Eades who wrote Protein Power (excellent book also) also has a blog.
__________________
Terry
watcher513 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2012, 06:42 AM   #11
creseis
Senior LCF Member
 
creseis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Ancramdale, NY
Posts: 770
Gallery: creseis
Stats: 157/156/135
WOE: Atkins/Eades's/Volek and Phinney/Attia.. Ketogenic
Start Date: Jan 4, 2014
@stella: Oddly enough, I have not found a single convincing, scientific, argument on the other side. I am a scientist and I am always *looking* for opposition in order to ensure that my science is pure and can withstand scrutiny. I have become so bitterly in favor of lc in part because nothing I have read to the contrary has any inkling of credibility. I don't understand it at all, and if you or anyone else find anything, I would love to read it. It is usually the same "fat is bad" but we can't tell you how that works in with body chemistry.

For a very long time, humans truly believed that the world is flat. Is that what LC is? Is this just a stepping stone towards the right direction? I don't know. But the evidence is on the LC side, for me at least, right now.
creseis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2012, 08:42 AM   #12
LiterateGriffin
Major LCF Poster!
 
LiterateGriffin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Jacksonville, FL
Posts: 1,716
Gallery: LiterateGriffin
Stats: 236.5 start (Jan 2012) /210.8/150 goal 5'9", 44 yr
WOE: Atkins (though I think a fairly early version)
Start Date: Jan 6 2012
Stella,

The opposing scientific studies that have turned up (when a study IS cited, which is very rare) prove on examination, 100% of the time, to be majorly flawed in some way. The UC professor shows you one, and names several others if you care to go look. (NOTE: I consider the guy a fairly neutral source on this, as he hasn't got a diet plan to promote.)

And... I'm not a ware of a single LC lifestyle that discourages you from eating fruits and vegetables. (That's part of the 'bad press' we get.) Some (like Atkins) restrict them BRIEFLY, and then help you find the level you can eat and remain healthy.

I PERSONALLY don't eat much fruit for several reasons. (Two of those reasons are under 4" tall and call me "Mom". They love fruit, and most of the fruit in the house goes to them. They go thru it like crazy!) The other reason is that fruit ALONE doesn't satisfy me, so I prefer to eat it with a meal, as dessert. And I'm not usually terribly hungry by the end of my meals.

Again, I am not following the plan you're on, so my mileage may differ a bit. But if you're doing a paleo-type diet, I can tell you that our paelo ancestors were hunter GATHERERS. They were just as likely to chow down on spring greens as we are today. (I grew up harvesting greens from the yard, as things thawed out every spring.) Those are an LC staple, whatever your plan. Or to dig up roots -- though I still avoid things like starchy beets and carrots. So using the Paleo logic, I'm pretty sure that sort of food would be allowed.

A common 'problem' among new LCers is to go, "What, I'm supposed to eat meat and eggs, but not grains? And... I have to limit fruits and veggies, too?" And because they're still processing this very new way of thinking about how to eat, that gets distilled down to, "I'm only supposed to eat meat & eggs." (Particularly as that's what the media tends to think LC means.)

I just wanted to make sure, based on your one question, that THAT'S not the thinking you're falling into (perhaps without noticing.)
LiterateGriffin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2012, 09:28 AM   #13
jem51
Major LCF Poster!
 
jem51's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Chico, CA
Posts: 2,347
Gallery: jem51
Stats: oh so happy at 120
WOE: Mine, all mine
Start Date: controlled carb '97-98
First of all liver function tests are often abnormal in those w a high carb diet. In the past it was thought to be just diabetics (and the obvious alcohol related) but now it is common.
LC should straighten that out quickly.

Whether you choose to eat fresh fruit and vegies is entirely up to you.
There are those who believe produce is unneccessary and those who believe it's healthy...then there are those who would not be able to follow LC plans w/o the variety that produce offers.

If it is something that you enjoy, then why not?

The other aspect is that keeping something as simple as produce may keep you connected w friends that are carb eaters, vegetarians, etc.

Whether to eat some fruit or not is your choice. Fruit may be the reason that we have sweet taste buds since when we were in the wild, that would've been the source.
__________________
jem51 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2012, 10:07 AM   #14
stellarexplorer
Senior LCF Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: New York
Posts: 90
Gallery: stellarexplorer
Stats: Male 6'-0" 193/167/170
WOE: no added sugar/ no starches
Start Date: March 21, 2012
I am excited to hear that both of you have been attentive and have failed to find credible critique on the other side. I also want to make sure to let you know how much I appreciate your sharing your knowledge and experience with me -- it helps make this much less a lone venture!

A few things:

First, do you know Robert Lustig is featured on "60 Minutes" tonight in a program entitled "Is Sugar Toxic?"

Second, I found this video fascinating, and entertaining as a bonus:

In it, Dr. Christopher Gardner of the Stanford School of Medicine describes his analysis and experiments on outcomes of Atkins vs. other well-known diets, including the LEARN diet, which he describes as "Your typical doctor-recommended diet". Worth a viewing, IMO.

Creseis, I love your "World is Flat Maybe" metaphor!

Thanks jem -- appreciate the thoughtful response. Agree on fruit, ie there must have been some available to our distant ancestors. They also probably found the means to access small amounts of honey from bees.

Literate, thank you for getting me to clarify. I think I may have been asking a question that was a bit of a diversion. It was responsive to reading Peter Attia, where he asks "How can carbohydrate restriction be healthy if it means limiting “natural foods” like fruits and vegetables?"
How can carbohydrate restriction be healthy if it means limiting

Since I already have something of a paleo mindset as I approach LC, I find the question a challenging one. So I want to make sure i know what I think about this one. And surely the available fruits and vegetables then were not adapted by milennia of deliberate human intervention.

But I agree that no one is arguing not to eat them at all. My plan is very similar to Atkins, BTW. It differs most in allowing a small amount of nuts, cheese and a glass of red wine in the first two weeks. As I delve further, I am no doubt going to call my plan something else, as (like many people I think) I come to personalize it some.

Last edited by stellarexplorer; 04-01-2012 at 10:16 AM..
stellarexplorer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2012, 05:27 AM   #15
creseis
Senior LCF Member
 
creseis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Ancramdale, NY
Posts: 770
Gallery: creseis
Stats: 157/156/135
WOE: Atkins/Eades's/Volek and Phinney/Attia.. Ketogenic
Start Date: Jan 4, 2014
I think the problem is not with the fruits and veggies, but that we have somewhat damaged to completely damaged our ability to metabolize sugars properly because of all of the total carbohydrates we have eaten, so in order to fix the problem, fruits and high carb veggies must be taken out, too. Whether or not you can add them back in is up to whether it is possible to actually fix the metabolic damage that has been done. Traditionally, carbohydrate sources were scarce and limited to a few weeks to months out of the year, so carbohydrate overload was never an issue until mass agriculture and genetically modifying agriculture to grow in odd seasons. So yeah, some people should not eat fruits because their bodies have been too damaged already. Fruits *might* be toxic to those people. I am one of them. Fortunately, we also have the technology to get all the supplements and vitamins we need from pills and powders, so just because you cut out the fruit and the starch and sugar does not mean you have to go without the nutrients. If we hadn't been ruining our metabolism all along, then yes, fruits and veggies would be great sources of nutrients.
creseis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2012, 06:02 AM   #16
clackley
Chatty Cathy
 
clackley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 13,775
Gallery: clackley
WOE: N.K.=vlc/moderate protein/high fat
Start Date: Restart Oct 18 2009
Quote:
Originally Posted by creseis View Post
I think the problem is not with the fruits and veggies, but that we have somewhat damaged to completely damaged our ability to metabolize sugars properly because of all of the total carbohydrates we have eaten, so in order to fix the problem, fruits and high carb veggies must be taken out, too. Whether or not you can add them back in is up to whether it is possible to actually fix the metabolic damage that has been done. Traditionally, carbohydrate sources were scarce and limited to a few weeks to months out of the year, so carbohydrate overload was never an issue until mass agriculture and genetically modifying agriculture to grow in odd seasons. So yeah, some people should not eat fruits because their bodies have been too damaged already. Fruits *might* be toxic to those people. I am one of them. Fortunately, we also have the technology to get all the supplements and vitamins we need from pills and powders, so just because you cut out the fruit and the starch and sugar does not mean you have to go without the nutrients. If we hadn't been ruining our metabolism all along, then yes, fruits and veggies would be great sources of nutrients.
^Exactly!!
__________________
Cathy
Original start - Feb. 2000 180/125

"The energy content of food (calories) matters, but it is less important than the metabolic effect of food on our body." Dr. P. Attia
“Eat animals. Mostly fat. Enjoy!
"I resist insulin" Hyperlipid
We are butter together!
clackley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2012, 09:57 AM   #17
lterry913
Major LCF Poster!
 
lterry913's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Ohio
Posts: 1,658
Gallery: lterry913
Stats: 5' 11" 238/174/170
WOE: Atkins
Start Date: 12/1/2010
People believe things until we can prove them wrong...You remember the world is flat and the sun revolves around the Earth...look how log it took to prove those theories wrong... a few went against the norm and did it though. We are all individuals and your way of eating could be considered your medication ... different people can eat different way and stay thin but are they healthy...there are a lot of thin people out there dying from heart attacks high blood pressure and a myriad of other health issues. Do what is right for you... you can only find out what will work for your body through experimenting. I experimented with high sugar low fat and it didn't work lol...I also tried low fat low sugar...no luck. did food combo with success when younger but did not fare so well in my 40's. Atkin's was the fit for me and my body ...I hope you find yours and don't fear being different or going against the norm...It's kind of cool to be different nowadays.
__________________
Control breeds Confidence.

Being fat is Hard...Dieting is Hard... Pick your hard

Live, Laugh, Love and...LEARN from mistakes

65 pounds lost so far and not looking back
lterry913 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2012, 08:50 PM   #18
stellarexplorer
Senior LCF Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: New York
Posts: 90
Gallery: stellarexplorer
Stats: Male 6'-0" 193/167/170
WOE: no added sugar/ no starches
Start Date: March 21, 2012
Quote:
So yeah, some people should not eat fruits because their bodies have been too damaged already.
I sure hope I'm not one of them. I love fruit.

Quote:
Do what is right for you... you can only find out what will work for your body through experimenting.
lterry, you have hit on part of what I have been concluding. I am struggling with two different issues, with only partial overlap.

One, as you say, is what to eat to be healthy and to maintain a comfortable weight. The other is what I believe about why such a diet works, ie. what is the biochemistry, psychology, and neurobiology behind it.

If my WOE is working for me, meaning my weight is good, I feel good, my medical issues normalize, and I am comfortable with my food and food choices, that's great and I would hope to continue because those are some of the important reasons behind a WOE decision.

On the other hand, there may be various explanations for why that WOE is good or works, etc. I may opt for that WOE while reserving the right to not fully accept one or many ideas experts posit to explain the thinking behind the WOE. I am very cautious about the emotion and ideology connected to food and diet. I do feel a need to elaborate my own position and beliefs about these things, even when they may differ from the convictions of some of the gurus who support my own chosen WOE.

In case it doesn't sound like it, I am spending much of my free time learning and thinking about this stuff at the moment!
stellarexplorer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2012, 09:44 PM   #19
creseis
Senior LCF Member
 
creseis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Ancramdale, NY
Posts: 770
Gallery: creseis
Stats: 157/156/135
WOE: Atkins/Eades's/Volek and Phinney/Attia.. Ketogenic
Start Date: Jan 4, 2014
There is the mental satisfaction part, too, which is the hardest part. Some people can stay low carb for decades, like my Dad. Others, like myself, just have mental collapses sometimes and look to certain carby foods for comfort. We hope that the once in a while does not turn into a more common occurrence, but all too frequently people just go off the wagon completely because of the emotional aspects of eating. I wish I could be more like a robot and eat just what my body needs and nothing toxic! The toxic stuff is very tempting, whether it be sugar, drugs, alcohol, tobacco, gambling, etc.
creseis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2012, 11:01 PM   #20
stellarexplorer
Senior LCF Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: New York
Posts: 90
Gallery: stellarexplorer
Stats: Male 6'-0" 193/167/170
WOE: no added sugar/ no starches
Start Date: March 21, 2012
Quote:
The toxic stuff is very tempting, whether it be sugar, drugs, alcohol, tobacco, gambling, etc.
Yeah. I don't think we are equipped to face the tempting food choices available to us today. We've gotten too good at manufacturing appeals to our neural reward pathways. We are so susceptible to the immediate rewards, even if the consequences later are awful.

I have long believed that if I could severely limit foods with added sugars, I would go a long way to being in control of my weight and nutritional health. I haven't been able to do it for prolonged periods. At this moment I am more sold on sugar as toxic to me and toxic in general than ever before. It may be a fantasy, but I would like to hope that after I'm at my goal weight, that conviction and a plan I'm committed to will be sufficient to stop the bleeding. We'll see.
stellarexplorer is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 05:36 PM.


Copyright ©1999-2017 Netrition, Inc. All rights reserved. - Terms of Service | Privacy Policy
LowCarbFriends® is a registered mark of Netrition, Inc.