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Old 05-13-2017, 03:44 AM   #1
enemysugar
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Yee Ha, My Smoker Came!!! Gimme Some Idea's

IT'S CHRISTMAS IN MAY

We ordered a Smoker and it came yesterday. My Husband and I are in the Truck on our way to what he calls my" Pilgrimage to the Holy Land" the Local Meat Market. I've cleaned out the Freezer to make room for anything I can Smoke(well not anything exactly) I'm gonna buy a Brisket the size of Cleveland!!! Share you idea's pretty please!!!
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Old 05-13-2017, 07:14 AM   #2
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Congrats! Sorry...don't really know about smokers. Ribs, I guess?
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Old 05-13-2017, 07:17 AM   #3
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Turkeys!!! So good. My uncle owns one, when I ate carbage, he would stuff ours with fruit cocktail, onions & bell peppers and let is smoke all night. Now, we just have it without the fruit cocktail.
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Old 05-13-2017, 09:40 AM   #4
Charski
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Do you have a good meat thermometer? You'll need one to know when that brisket is done! If you don't, you can use a skewer or other probe, when the meat has the resistance of butter to probing it's probably ready.

An instant read thermometer is good, a digital probe thermometer meant for the smoker is better! That way you get a constant readout of the internal temperature of the meat as well as the temperature inside the smoker box.

You want to run it at about 225*, more or less. We run ours between 200* and 225* for the most part. Once it will no longer hold a temp of at least 200*, we pull the meat and finish cooking it in the oven if it's not done - and brisket won't be done, it takes many hours.

As for seasoning, there are lots of great ideas online for rubs and such. Some people also inject liquids (seasoned apple juice, wine, etc.) into the meat but we've never done that, preferring the good beefy flavor to too much seasoning.

My current favorite rub is easy peasy - equal parts peppercorns, kosher salt, paprika, and dried rosemary, ground up in a coffee grinder or other appliance that can grind them all together, even a mortar and pestle will work if that's what you have. Apply liberally all over the meat, preferably then put it in the fridge overnight or at least for a few hours; you don't HAVE to but it helps the salt pull into the meat and season it throughout.

We start ours with charcoal, get it to the ash stage, then add nice pieces of soaked wood - oak or mesquite or hickory or whatever you like - drained, then added to the charcoal just before the meat goes in.

You'll need to learn to adjust your inlets and outlets to keep the temperature at the right level. It takes some time to figure it out and every smoker is different!

Get that brisket up to an internal temp of at least 190* - you can go a little higher if you want, we usually pull between 190* and 195* (and that includes the time in the oven at 225* til it's done) - it will rise, rise, rise, then it just sits there at about the same temp for what seems like FOREVER as the collagen and fats liquidize, then it will finally rise some more to the final temp.

Pull from the heat source and let stand at room temp for the juices to redistribute, at least 30 minutes, up to an hour is fine. When we put it in the oven, it's on a big rimmed baking sheet, then covered with foil, with the temp probe still in place.

This all SOUNDS like a lot but you'll quickly learn your smoker and your preferences, and then it won't seem like such a big deal! The results are SO worth it!

I'm no expert but I can at least share what works for US! Let me know if you have any questions and I'll try to answer them for you - feel free to PM me if you want.
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Old 05-13-2017, 09:41 AM   #5
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OH, and before you put ANY meat in there - be sure to follow the smoker manufacturer's recommendations for burn in! You don't want volatiles from the manufacturing process all over your precious meats!
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Old 05-13-2017, 01:10 PM   #6
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Enemysugar, buying a devoted smoker has been down the food chain for us. Congratulations!! One day I'll get one. But for now, I do it the very low tech way. A Weber charcoal grill is all I've ever used.

What has made it quasi bearable for me is using an igrill probe thermometer. It's a Bluetooth device, so I can monitor what's going on from in the house, so I don't have to constantly run out to the patio. It's contributed a lot to the consistency of results and has saved some major time. As the saying goes, "if you're lookin' you ain't cookin'!" How true!

It came with two probes. I bought the ambient probe for an additional $25. So worth it!

Let's see. What are my favorite things to smoke?? Well, turkey is pretty darned awesome. But failing that, I will stick a couple of spatchcocked chickens on there. Those last us for several dinners. A big fave here is boneless pork loin. It turns out just phenomenally. We have done leg of lamb, but found, for our palates, that the smoke flavor overwhelms the delicate taste of a really good lamb. Ribs, either pork or beef, are always a reliable bet.

Our two favorite woods are apple and cherry chunks. Mesquite is a little heavy duty, in-your-face for us (well, for me, actually.) The fruit woods tend to lend a subtle complexity to your product that really rings my bells.

So what brand did you get? Go ahead. Make me pea green with envy, and tell me a Big Green Egg...
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Old 05-13-2017, 01:19 PM   #7
Baricat
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Forgot to mention that a dry brine is a must for consistently turning out the moist juicy meat. I usually do that for 3 days for poultry, 24 hours for pork or smaller cuts like short ribs. Of course, that's when I've thought of doing this a few days in advance. Even if not, though, any amount of time, even an hour or two, is better than not brining at all. This step really makes a big difference in your finished product.

Then, apply a dry rub of your spices (plenty of salt will have been absorbed already during the dry brine time) several hours before slapping that puppy onto your smoker.

I'm salivating. Just the very thought of it is food porn!
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Last edited by Baricat; 05-13-2017 at 01:20 PM..
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Old 05-13-2017, 02:27 PM   #8
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If you are on Facebook check out this public group:
https://www.facebook.com/groups/731681356979953/

Lots of folks on there sharing ideas.
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Old 05-13-2017, 03:05 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Baricat View Post
Enemysugar, buying a devoted smoker has been down the food chain for us. Congratulations!! One day I'll get one. But for now, I do it the very low tech way. A Weber charcoal grill is all I've ever used.

What has made it quasi bearable for me is using an igrill probe thermometer. It's a Bluetooth device, so I can monitor what's going on from in the house, so I don't have to constantly run out to the patio. It's contributed a lot to the consistency of results and has saved some major time. As the saying goes, "if you're lookin' you ain't cookin'!" How true!

It came with two probes. I bought the ambient probe for an additional $25. So worth it!

Let's see. What are my favorite things to smoke?? Well, turkey is pretty darned awesome. But failing that, I will stick a couple of spatchcocked chickens on there. Those last us for several dinners. A big fave here is boneless pork loin. It turns out just phenomenally. We have done leg of lamb, but found, for our palates, that the smoke flavor overwhelms the delicate taste of a really good lamb. Ribs, either pork or beef, are always a reliable bet.

Our two favorite woods are apple and cherry chunks. Mesquite is a little heavy duty, in-your-face for us (well, for me, actually.) The fruit woods tend to lend a subtle complexity to your product that really rings my bells.

So what brand did you get? Go ahead. Make me pea green with envy, and tell me a Big Green Egg...
Girl, check this one OUT. Makes a BGE look like a dimestore cowboy!

http://lowcarbfriends.com/bbs/showpo...5&postcount=10

You'll have to Google the make/model but it's worth it, trust me.
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It's easy to be miserable. Being happy takes more work. ~~from Ondine, the movie~~

Veni, vidi, velcro - I came, I saw, I stuck.

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Old 05-13-2017, 03:59 PM   #10
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My son had a smoker and pork shoulder was the best!! My friends bf smokes cheddar cheese! Have fun.
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Old 05-13-2017, 05:54 PM   #11
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I am a member of a couple of smoking groups on FB but do not have a smoker of my own... yet. But I can offer a few suggestions.

They say "low and slow" for a reason. Hot and fast is for grilling, smoking cooks everything at a lower temp over longer times to make everything tender and juicy. Excepting a few things, like wings and such, know that fixing something in the smoker will take hours from beginning to end but that the end result will be worth it. Cooking more rather than less is a really good idea as you can freeze the extra for another day.

Smoked eggs, smoked in the shell. They cook like boiled eggs but absorb some smoke flavor. Google for times and temps, though.

Wings. Many rave about the wings they make on the smoker.

Sausage/bacon. Many make their own sausages and bacon and use their smoker to finish them.

Cheeses. This takes some thought as you have to cold smoke cheese but the results are amazing.

Bacon-wrapped poppers. 'Nuff said.

Spatchcocked chicken/turkey. By spatchcocking the fowl you are able to cook them evenly and more quickly.

The wood you use makes the biggest difference. Pecan gives a different taste than apple, mesquite gives a different taste than white oak. Some Googling can help you decide on what you want to aim for. It your smoker uses pellets it works the same way. Charcoal can work but using wood will take it to a whole 'nother orbit.
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Old 05-13-2017, 08:25 PM   #12
Baricat
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Charski View Post
Girl, check this one OUT. Makes a BGE look like a dimestore cowboy!

http://lowcarbfriends.com/bbs/showpo...5&postcount=10

You'll have to Google the make/model but it's worth it, trust me.
Char, some things cannot be unseen...

Whereas that particular size is a lot bigger than I'd need or be able to store, I get the idea. And here I was coveting a mere BGE. Of course, when you're doing all your smoking on a rinky dink Weber kettle grill, any dedicated smoker looks pretty darned good.
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Old 05-14-2017, 03:23 PM   #13
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I have a small, stovetop smoker and my favorite thing to smoke is salmon fillets.

A simple overnight brine with dill and a little onion. The fillets don't take too long in a regular smoker, only about 2-3 hours, so put them in during the last few hours of smoking something else.

Incredibly delicious. Spread cucumber slices with seasoned cream cheese & top with chunks of salmon.
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Old 05-16-2017, 04:40 PM   #14
terez
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When I lived in Nashville, the lady who owned the house had a small meat smoker. I think I made a pile of maybe 10 briquettes and smoked a pretty small turkey for 10 hours. Every couple of hours I would add a couple more briquettes. It created a small, smoke and the end product was outstanding. The meat was pink (like a ham, cooked) and soft, and it looked like the gourmet turkey you see in the supermarkets.

I have never been able to duplicate it. I then got a larger one from Lowes when I moved away and, maybe because it was in the back yard, not around a bunch of houses, the wind made the smaller type of smoking impossible.

So, I switched to an electric one. I got Builtmaster which had temperatures from around 110F to 300F. Still, it never matched the wonderful type of meat that the Nashville one did. But, I could smoke things at a much lower temperature. I would smoke chickens and turkeys at around 165F. In order to make the hickory chips smoke, I had to shred them in my wood shredder to make flakes. Then they smoked beautifully.

Easy things are ribs. You can't hurt them. Salmon, I found, I could smoke for exactly 3 3/4 hours at 140F. But it has to be frozen and skin side down.

I also sprayed racks and trays, even the ones where the grease drips down, with Pam or some other oil spray. It makes cleanup so much easier. Although my dog certainly did his part to help after the food was done.
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Old 05-17-2017, 04:10 AM   #15
enemysugar
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Charski View Post
Do you have a good meat thermometer? You'll need one to know when that brisket is done! If you don't, you can use a skewer or other probe, when the meat has the resistance of butter to probing it's probably ready.

An instant read thermometer is good, a digital probe thermometer meant for the smoker is better! That way you get a constant readout of the internal temperature of the meat as well as the temperature inside the smoker box.

You want to run it at about 225*, more or less. We run ours between 200* and 225* for the most part. Once it will no longer hold a temp of at least 200*, we pull the meat and finish cooking it in the oven if it's not done - and brisket won't be done, it takes many hours.

As for seasoning, there are lots of great ideas online for rubs and such. Some people also inject liquids (seasoned apple juice, wine, etc.) into the meat but we've never done that, preferring the good beefy flavor to too much seasoning.

My current favorite rub is easy peasy - equal parts peppercorns, kosher salt, paprika, and dried rosemary, ground up in a coffee grinder or other appliance that can grind them all together, even a mortar and pestle will work if that's what you have. Apply liberally all over the meat, preferably then put it in the fridge overnight or at least for a few hours; you don't HAVE to but it helps the salt pull into the meat and season it throughout.

We start ours with charcoal, get it to the ash stage, then add nice pieces of soaked wood - oak or mesquite or hickory or whatever you like - drained, then added to the charcoal just before the meat goes in.

You'll need to learn to adjust your inlets and outlets to keep the temperature at the right level. It takes some time to figure it out and every smoker is different!

Get that brisket up to an internal temp of at least 190* - you can go a little higher if you want, we usually pull between 190* and 195* (and that includes the time in the oven at 225* til it's done) - it will rise, rise, rise, then it just sits there at about the same temp for what seems like FOREVER as the collagen and fats liquidize, then it will finally rise some more to the final temp.

Pull from the heat source and let stand at room temp for the juices to redistribute, at least 30 minutes, up to an hour is fine. When we put it in the oven, it's on a big rimmed baking sheet, then covered with foil, with the temp probe still in place.

This all SOUNDS like a lot but you'll quickly learn your smoker and your preferences, and then it won't seem like such a big deal! The results are SO worth it!

I'm no expert but I can at least share what works for US! Let me know if you have any questions and I'll try to answer them for you - feel free to PM me if you want.
I would not have gotten through the start up process of this Smoker with out all your expert advice, Charski I kept going back to your post to get more info. I went right out and got a good Digital Thermometer. I made the Brisket with Your Rub and help, Thank You
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Old 05-18-2017, 08:00 PM   #16
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I've done lots of different things in mine but keep coming back to pork shoulder. I like brisket but have a hard convincing myself it is worth $5/pound. Bacon (and bacon jerky) are also things I do periodically. I also like meatloaf and turkey legs that I made.

For my pork shoulder I usually just put rub on it and leave it in the refrigerator overnight. Then smoke it at about 240 until it gets to 190. I don't baste it during the cook but lots of people do. I also monitor the temp of the cooker real closely (I use at least 2 thermometers to watch the smoker temp).

Have fun.
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