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Old 03-26-2015, 11:27 AM   #91
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This is so interesting. I can see adding a few dishes into my future I have not recently enjoyed: rice pudding, chicken rice soup, fried rice and a few others.

I hope the research continues. Thank you for posting.
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Old 03-26-2015, 11:56 AM   #92
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I've been cooking short-grain brown rice, then cooling it, then reheating it to eat - I use about 1/2 cup portions. It has been doing fine for me. DH and I do the JUDDD approach (up day, down day) and on down days, I've been having the rice and about the same amount of cooked/cooled/reheated pinto beans, with a little pico de gallo on top. It fills me up for hours.

Kind of interesting to read the science behind what's going on here!
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Old 03-26-2015, 04:24 PM   #93
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Certainly interesting but I don't see that they could be talking about just plain ole
"white rice". Their cooking times certainly aren't for "white rice".

Being a diabetic the calories are a non-issue for me but the carbs certainly are.

Thks for posting Charski, great info.
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Old 03-26-2015, 04:50 PM   #94
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They do say "even white rice" so apparently they've included it in their tests - the second article says they're gonna test many kinds of rice and see what they come up with.

And your second point is mine as well - meaning, I conjecture that the calories of which they speak are actually carbs, as that is what would be reduced by turning them into resistant starch - hence, less carbs, less calories as well - which means that they are considering the RS as fiber - which depending on your carb plan, MAY mean you can deduct that fiber from your total carb count.

Still lots of questions but worth following to see what they turn up with additional studies - especially the ones done on we humans!
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Old 03-29-2015, 04:55 PM   #95
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It would be interesting to know which types/brands of rice contain the higher amount of rs. I am wondering if this would also apply to the old varieties of wheat such as Einkorn, Emmer, and Durham. The first cooking would be the baking. Then you could freeze. Then reheat in the microwave or toast before eating. I always freeze my wheat to keep the bugs out of it. If I toasted it first. Then froze it, milled it, and then baked with it and froze the bread, then reheated or toasted... Would be interesting to know. Also I know that the process of making sourdough bread breaks down the number of carbs also. Would love to be able to eat some of my home baked bread again. Have come up with a couple of LC bread recipes that we use but sure miss the old stuff.
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Old 03-30-2015, 12:56 PM   #96
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I have not taken the time to read through all the posts here, so this may have already been said, but it's called "resistant starch" because it's resistant to digestion, gets passed through the small intestine and is deposited in the large intestine to ferment--feeding bacteria and allowing them to reproduce. Most people cannot handle large quantities of resistant starch and some people (myself included) don't handle much at all very well. There have been copious reports of experimentation with resistant starch on other blogs. Many people report phenomenal results at first, but the situation seems to worsen as time goes on. The most obvious problem with resistant starch is that it produces large quantities of gas, bloating and often pain, along with constipation and diarrhea, either one or the other or both alternating. Depending on what types of resistant starch you consume, the starch may nourish so-called "bad" bacteria, ones that can cause health problems in humans -- acid reflux, celiac disease, crohn's, IBS, intestinal permeability, even cancer. Nice as it is to eat carbs and not have a blood sugar rise, there are other health issues that don't involve insulin resistance. Humans simply are not meant to eat grains.
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Old 02-28-2016, 06:59 AM   #97
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The March, 2016 Prevention magazine has a great article on resistant starch, page 90.
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Old 02-28-2016, 07:49 AM   #98
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And I saw Dr Hyman on Dr Oz the other day promoting using potato starch. He had Dr Oz drink it! Dr Hyman says that it helps with the "good critters" in your gut. And says that it also helps with sleep so best time to take it is at night. I think that potato starch is going to be scarce!
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Old 02-28-2016, 02:23 PM   #99
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My lowcarber friend swears by the sleeping benefit. One Tbs was the right amount for her.
She puts it in her morning shake.
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Old 02-28-2016, 02:36 PM   #100
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I've been doing some experimenting with potatoes that are boiled, then frozen, then thawed and cooked...so far I have used them in a pot pie, and some hash browns. I've been VERY conservative with portion size. I just used half a small potato in the pot pie along with a few baby carrots, celery, and half a turnip. It didn't send my husband's blood sugar any higher than a whole turnip would have. Same with the hash browns. I mixed half a potato with half a turnip and some onion. Got about the same blood sugar reading as with a whole turnip. So it reduces it some.

I have a small can of corned beef. I'm going to make some hash with the potato for breakfast. We like a hash patty with an egg cooked in the middle. I'll let you know how that works. (DH didn't much like my hash made with cauliflower! He's a New England Yankee, and picky about his corned beef hash!)
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Old 02-28-2016, 02:47 PM   #101
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Sharon, I'm a NEnglander, too and your corned beef sounds great. The JUDD board here is starting a potato hack plan tomorrow. Just taters, no fat.
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Old 03-06-2016, 04:34 PM   #102
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This is all so interesting! Char, thanks for directing me to the thread and it is nice to read everyone's comments!
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Old 09-01-2016, 05:37 AM   #103
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I have been on the resistant starch diet for a year now and have lost 60lbs. I have always had a weight problem, especially after having a total hysterectomy about 13 years ago. I can eat just about anything on this diet (even potato chips every now and then). I make my own recipes using the cooled whole grain rice, whole grain pasta, and potato's). I have a "cheat" day every Saturday where I allow myself whatever I want to eat, (pizza, ice cream, etc....). I love this as I'm not deprived of carbs and even eat bread (pumpernickel or rye), corn, beans, and lots of fresh fruit...........
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Old 09-01-2016, 09:04 AM   #104
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Would love to know the results of anyone on this board who checks their glucose. More for my family than me. I have given up pasta, breads, potatoes since lower carb.
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Old 09-02-2016, 07:13 PM   #105
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Thanks to Bonbon for bringing this subject here.

Years ago I tried a blood sugar test with Dreamfield's pasta.
The results were that it was still too high for a diabetic.

After reading this article I am going to experiment with cooked
and re-heated pasta. I used to cook a couple lbs. of linguini and
some ziti and under-cook it a bit and then freeze in 1 c. ramekins,
adding a tbs. of water. It was so simple to nuke and have a cup of pasta.
Never thought about it being healthier.

Will cook some linguini tonight, put it up in ramekins and use it
tomorrow. Just happen to have homemade marina from our tomatoes.

Will report after a few trials.
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Old 09-02-2016, 07:49 PM   #106
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Happy to help Barbo! Here is some more reading for you.

Are the health claims about apple cider vinegar true?

Interesting: "It turned out that the cider vinegar, but not the malt vinegar, had a big impact, reducing the amount of sugar in the volunteers' blood by 36% over 90 minutes..."

Fresh off the BBC presses:

Cider vinegar is made by mixing chopped-up apples with water and sugar, then allowing the mixture to ferment, turning some of it into acetic acid.
Despite being acidic and definitely something of an acquired taste, in recent years cider vinegar has become incredibly popular. At least a part of that is because of claims that it can help with everything from obesity to split ends and arthritis.

But which, if any, of the many different health claims made on its behalf stand up to scientific scrutiny? For Trust Me, I'm A Doctor we teamed up with Dr James Brown from Aston University to find out.

We started by testing a claim which does seem to have the most scientific credibility - the claim that drinking a couple of tablespoons of vinegar, diluted in water, before a meal will help you control your blood sugar levels.

To see if there was substance to this idea we recruited healthy volunteers and asked them to eat two bagels, after having fasted overnight. We measured their blood sugar levels before and after eating and, as we expected, bagel consumption was followed by a large and rapid rise in their blood sugar levels.

The next day we asked them to consume another two bagels, but this time we asked them to knock back a diluted shot of apple cider vinegar just before doing so. Finally, we repeated the test a few days later, but this time we got our brave volunteers to gulp down some dilute malt vinegar before the bagel.

It turned out that the cider vinegar, but not the malt vinegar, had a big impact, reducing the amount of sugar in the volunteers' blood by 36% over 90 minutes.
This could be because the acetic acid in the cider vinegar suppresses the breakdown of starches, which means that if you consume it before a carb-rich meal, less sugar will get absorbed. We expected the malt vinegar to have a similar effect to the cider vinegar, but in our small study it didn't.

Next, we wanted to see whether cider vinegar lived up to claims that it helps with weight loss, lowers cholesterol and reduces inflammation (which might help with conditions like rheumatoid/inflammatory arthritis and eczema).
We recruited 30 volunteers and divided them into three groups. Our first group were asked to drink two tablespoons of cider vinegar diluted in 200ml of water twice a day, every day, before a meal. The second group were asked to do the same with malt vinegar and the final group were given a placebo consisting of coloured water.

Two months later I met up with Dr Brown and our volunteers to find out how they had all got on. Most were very positive about the experience. A few thought they might have lost a bit of weight, with one saying she didn't feel as much craving for sweet things. Another volunteer with mild arthritis told me: "I have had less aches and pains in my joints, especially after exercise." Yet another thought it had improved her eczema.

But what did Dr Brown's tests reveal?
"I'm sorry to say," he told his expectant audience, "that none of you lost any weight."
That was disappointing, though not entirely surprising.

So what about the alleged anti-inflammatory properties of vinegar, which could explain improvements in arthritis or eczema? As part of the testing Dr Brown had measured our volunteers' blood levels of something called C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker for inflammation in the body.

Two months later I met up with Dr Brown and our volunteers to find out how they had all got on. Most were very positive about the experience. A few thought they might have lost a bit of weight, with one saying she didn't feel as much craving for sweet things. Another volunteer with mild arthritis told me: "I have had less aches and pains in my joints, especially after exercise." Yet another thought it had improved her eczema.

But what did Dr Brown's tests reveal?

"I'm sorry to say," he told his expectant audience, "that none of you lost any weight."

That was disappointing, though not entirely surprising.

So what about the alleged anti-inflammatory properties of vinegar, which could explain improvements in arthritis or eczema? As part of the testing Dr Brown had measured our volunteers' blood levels of something called C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker for inflammation in the body.

Again, unfortunately, we didn't see any changes. We did see a small fall in the CRP levels of some of those taking cider vinegar, but it wasn't enough to get excited about.

So far things had been rather disappointing for vinegar guzzlers. Dr Brown, however, had the results for one final test to reveal - the effect on blood fats.
In neither the placebo nor the malt vinegar group was there any change. But those consuming cider vinegar saw an average 13% reduction in total cholesterol, with a strikingly large reduction in triglycerides (a form of fat). And this was a particularly impressive finding because our volunteers were all healthy at the start, with normal cholesterol levels.

"Bringing cholesterol levels down like this", Dr Brown told me, "can significantly reduce your chances of having a heart attack in the future. So we were really excited to see that finding."

So cider vinegar probably won't help anyone slim down, but it may help those who struggle with their blood sugar or cholesterol levels. Because it is acidic I would only drink it diluted or use it sparingly in food.
Michael Mosley presents a new series of "Trust Me I'm a Doctor" which starts on BBC Two on Thursday 1 September at 20:00 BST

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Old 09-02-2016, 11:14 PM   #107
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Barbo View Post
Years ago I tried a blood sugar test with Dreamfield's pasta.
The results were that it was still too high for a diabetic.

After reading this article I am going to experiment with cooked
and re-heated pasta. I used to cook a couple lbs. of linguini and
some ziti and under-cook it a bit and then freeze in 1 c. ramekins,
adding a tbs. of water. It was so simple to nuke and have a cup of pasta.
Never thought about it being healthier.

Will cook some linguini tonight, put it up in ramekins and use it
tomorrow. Just happen to have homemade marina from our tomatoes.

Will report after a few trials.
I tried this with potatoes. I boiled some potatoes, cut them into quarters, then froze them. I took half a potato out and thawed it and used it in a pot pie instead of the turnip I usually use. The blood sugar reaction to the frozen, thawed and reheated potato was no higher than with the same dish made with an equal amount of turnip.

So I got brave and took a half a potato from the freezer, thawed it, diced it and made hash browns. Blood sugar rise was about the same as for an equal amount of cooked turnips.

I also tried it in corned beef hash, using half resistant potato and half cauliflower. Again, no appreciable rise in blood sugar.

I kept the servings small, but it seems that potatoes cooked this way have about the same effect on blood sugar as a turnip.

Sharon
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Old 09-03-2016, 04:31 PM   #108
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Trial Test on Blood Sugar with Resistant Pasta

Fasting sugar 88 3:00 p.m.

1 c. of reheated spaghetti
2 tbs. of plain home made tomato sauce

Will check at 4:00 p.m.
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Old 09-04-2016, 08:25 AM   #109
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Watching this closely. Thanks for experimenting Barbo. I really miss pasta and potatoes!
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Old 09-04-2016, 03:00 PM   #110
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So Barbo - how'd it turn out??
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Old 09-04-2016, 07:37 PM   #111
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I'm going to buy a little bag of frozen french fries. They are cooked and frozen, so should be pretty resistant when reheated. I'm still keeping the servings REALLY small, though. They will be easy to dice up for things like pot pies, too.
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Old 09-06-2016, 12:58 PM   #112
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Barbo? Where you AT, woman?! Hope all is OK!
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Old 09-06-2016, 07:05 PM   #113
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Sorry I got seriously interrupted.

After 4 hours my blood sugar was 92......
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Old 09-06-2016, 07:28 PM   #114
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Barbo View Post
Sorry I got seriously interrupted.

After 4 hours my blood sugar was 92......
Now that's pretty amazing, huh? Good for you!
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Old 09-07-2016, 09:04 AM   #115
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sbwertz View Post
I'm going to buy a little bag of frozen french fries. They are cooked and frozen, so should be pretty resistant when reheated. I'm still keeping the servings REALLY small, though. They will be easy to dice up for things like pot pies, too.
Sharon....Did you try this? What do you consider a small serving?
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Old 09-07-2016, 12:18 PM   #116
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Hmmm. I wonder if pre-cooked refrigerated potatoes (Bob Evans, Simply Potatoes) would have the same effect.

Or dried potato flakes? Probably not.
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Old 09-07-2016, 08:42 PM   #117
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I tried the pasta test tonight but I ate it like I normally would. So I had a cup of pasta with low carb sauce and two meatballs plus a small salad. Before reading was 87...hourly checks were 129, 122, 113, 101. My bs definitely went higher because I would usually sub with spaghetti squash or zucchini. Was hoping it would be back to normal after three hours or at least 90s. Don't think I will be eating pasta
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Old 09-07-2016, 10:10 PM   #118
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Chele Pa

Yup that's the same conclusion that I came to.

4 hours to get into the 90s. Today DH did a lot of zoodles for us.
I'll saute it in a bit of good olive oil and top with my marinara and
some grated cheese. It will have to do, or use 1/2 c. re-heated pasta and
add to the zoodles.
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Old 09-11-2016, 11:14 PM   #119
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I made the hash tonight. I used one small frozen precooked potato and one small turnip, and half a small onion. We split it between us. My husband tested just before dinner, and again at 10 pm before going to bed...6pm and 10pm. Blood sugar was only 3 points higher at 10 pm than it was at 6pm before dinner! Pretty much a couch potato today as well.

I haven't bought any frozen french fries yet because I still had a container of frozen boiled potatoes in the freezer. My freezer is packed full right now, so I am waiting until I use up the frozen ones before I buy the french fries.
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Old 10-26-2016, 06:54 AM   #120
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Watched this on BBC "Trust Me, I'm a Doctor"

All 10 volunteers with the same results...pretty compelling!
Here is the text version:

Can my leftovers be healthier than the original meal?
Most of us love starchy carbohydrate foods like bread, pasta and potatoes — but they’re not always good for our health. Although starch is an important part of a healthy diet, it’s easily broken down. As soon as we consume starch the body very quickly starts to digest it, releasing sugars into the blood which in turn causes our bodies to release the hormone insulin. It’s a boom and bust cycle that can take a toll on our health.

Dr Chris van Tulleken joined forces with Dr Denise Robertson from the University of Surrey to carry out an experiment. We wanted to find out if there is a simple way to make starchy foods better for us without changing a single ingredient. What no one expected was that we’d make a brand new scientific discovery along the way.

When starch is cooked in water and then cooled it changes shape. The new structure is resistant to enzymes in our body and so can’t be digested- it’s known as ‘resistant starch’. Resistant starch passes through the body without being digested until it reaches the colon where it acts like fibre and feeds our ‘good bacteria’.

How to remove calories from your carbs!
Dr Chris van Tulleken discovers a brand new way to make carbohydrates healthier.

How to remove calories from your carbs!
View Programme information

How to make carbohydrates good for you: creating resistant starch
View Programme information
The health benefits of resistant starch
When regular starch becomes resistant starch, most of the sugars it contains aren’t released in your gut and so your body will take in fewer calories from the same food.
Because less sugar is released into the blood stream from this resistance starch, there’s less of a blood sugar spike. In turn, this reduces the levels of insulin in the blood.
Resistant starch is indigestible and so shares many properties with fibre, helping food pass through the gut and generally improving digestion.
Once it reaches the lower gut, resistant starch feeds our beneficial bacteria, which in turn produce chemicals which can help our immune systems, cardiovascular health and many other benefits.
Researchers have known about resistant starch for over twenty years but despite its health benefits it’s not something that we hear about very often. However, our experiment revealed a whole new way to improve the healthiness of our food that surprised everyone.
The experiment
The volunteers underwent 3 days of testing. Each day they had to eat a bowl of white pasta, topped with a simple tomato sauce.

On one day they ate pasta hot, when it was freshly cooked.

On a second day they ate pasta cold, after it had been chilled overnight

On a third day they ate pasta which had been chilled and then reheated.

Directly after they’d eaten their bowl of pasta each volunteer took their own blood sample every fifteen minutes for two hours. We analysed these samples to find out how much glucose they had in their blood and plotted how their blood sugar level changed as they digested the meal.
Results
When the volunteers ate the hot, freshly cooked, pasta their blood glucose showed the expected sharp rise and fall, shown by the green line in the graph below. But when they ate the chilled pasta, the blood glucose didn’t rise as much (the blue line on the graph). The cold pasta therefore didn’t cause the unhealthy surges in blood sugar and insulin.


The surprising results, though, were from the volunteers who ate the reheated pasta, shown by the red line on the graph. This had never been tried before and the results were striking: the blood glucose in these volunteers rose 50% less than it did after eating even the chilled pasta, with its known health benefits! This means that simply reheating your pasta (and probably potatoes and other starchy foods) after chilling it in the fridge makes it much healthier – protecting you against sharp spikes in blood sugar and giving you all the benefits of fibre, without having to change what you’re eating.

Why only 10 volunteers?
Several people have asked why only 10 volunteers could give us such strong conclusions. We did our experiment according to the WHO protocol for this sort of testing, and 10 volunteers tested this way have been shown to give statistically robust results (adding more gives diminishing returns). See this scientific paper for more details.

Dr Robinson hopes to publish the results of this experiment, and when the paper is published we shall make the full details of the method and statistical results available.
This graph compares the amount the blood glucose rose and fell with each different meal

Sources of resistant starch
There are plenty of foods which contain resistant starch without even having to create it through cooking methods such as chilling and reheating.

Unripe bananas contain lots of resistant starch. The resistant starch becomes digestible as the bananas ripen and cooking will also destroy the resistant starch, so choose bananas with just a hint of green on them if you want the benefits.
Whole grains are good sources of resistant starch as well as fibre.
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