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Old 10-16-2011, 03:05 AM   #17
locarbman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PianoAl View Post
Today I received .25 oz of pure sucralose powder. My first option is to dilute it with distilled water so that 1 drop = 1 tsp (same as Sweetzfree).
Hi Al ;-)

My Sucralose refractometer test of Sweetzfree Liquid Sucralose indicates a claimed strength of 192 times sugar using 26 grams Sucralose powder per 100 milliliters of water:

http://www.lowcarbfriends.com/bbs/bl...g-results.html

Sweetzfree: (Price per 1floz (30ml) bottle = $18.00)
Ingredients: Purified water, 100% pure Sucralose
Label: “ teaspoon (25 drops) = 1 cup sugar; 1 drop = 1 rounded teaspoon sugar, 1 ounce = 24 cups sugar”
Reference Website: "1 Ounce, the equivalent of 24 cups of sugar"
[FONT=Arial]From my recent order (1/24/2009) fact sheet " I will be happy to respond to all requests or comments. Diane

Label Results: Grams = 26, Milliliters = 100, Strength = 192 times sugar

Website Results: Grams = 26, Milliliters = 100, Strength = 192 times sugar

2/20/2009 (Freshly opened bottle)

Test Results: Grams = 24.7, Milliliters = 100, Strength = 182.626 times sugar

Price per 1 cup Sugar Equivalence = $0.79”

To create an equivalent strength with ounce of powder, I would mix your ounce of Sucralose powder in 5.5 teaspoons water:

.25oz = 7.09 grams (28.35g per ounce / 4)

A 26%w/v (weight/volume) Liquid Sucralose concentration (Sweetzfree equivalent concentration) requires 26g Sucralose powder mixed in 100 ml water.

Using a ratio: 26g is to 100ml water as 7.09g is to Xml water; cross multiplying we get X = 7.09*100/26; X = 27.27ml water

Using the Online Volume Conversion site:

27.27 milliter = 5.5 Teaspoon[US]

Therefore 5.5 teaspoons water mixed with .25oz Sucralose powder will yield a concentration of 26% w/v Liquid Sucralose at a strength of 192 times sugar where 1/4t = 1c sugar equivalence.

Hope this helps…locarbman ;-)

PS: Thanks ravenrose and judytab... ;-)

Last edited by locarbman; 10-16-2011 at 03:51 AM..
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