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TinO 02-10-2010 10:02 AM

78 reasons to avoid sugar
 
78 Reasons to Avoid Sugar

1. Sugar can suppress the immune system.
2. Sugar can upset the body's mineral balance.
3. Sugar can cause hyperactivity, anxiety, concentration difficulties, and crankiness in children.
4. Sugar can drowsiness and decreased activity in children.
5. Sugar can adversely affect children's school grades.
6. Sugar can produce a significant rise in triglycerides.
7. Sugar contributes to a weakened defense against bacterial infection.
8. Sugar can cause kidney damage.
9. Sugar can reduce helpful high density cholesterol.
10. Sugar can promote an elevation of harmful cholesterol.
11. Sugar may lead to chromium deficiency.
12. Sugar may cause copper deficiency.
13. Sugar interferes with absorption of calcium and magnesium.
14. Sugar may lead to cancer of the breast, ovaries, prostate, and rectum.
15. Sugar can cause colon cancer with an increased risk in women.
16. Sugar can be a risk factor in gall bladder cancer.
17. Sugar can increase fasting levels of blood glucose.
18. Sugar can weaken eyesight.
19. Sugar raises the level of a neurotransmitter called serotonin, which can narrow blood vessels.
20. Sugar can cause hypoglycemia.
21. Sugar can produce acidic stomach.
22. Sugar can raise adrenaline levels in children.
23. Sugar can increase the risk of coronary heart disease.
24. Sugar can speed the aging process, causing wrinkles and gray hair.
25. Sugar can lead to alcoholism.
26. Sugar can produce tooth decay.
27. Sugar can contribute to weight gain and obesity.
28. High intake of sugar increases the risk of Crohn's disease and Ulcerative Colitis.
29. Sugar can case a raw, inflamed intestinal tract in person with gastric or duodenal ulcers.
30. Sugar can cause arthritis.
31. Sugar can cause asthma.
32. Sugar can cause candidiasis (yeast infection).
33. Sugar can lead to the formation of gallstones.
34. Sugar can lead to the formation of kidney stones.
35. Sugar can cause ischemic heart disease.
36. Sugar can cause appendicitis.
37. Sugar can exacerbate the symptoms of multiple sclerosis.
38. Sugar can indirectly cause hemorrhoids.
39. Sugar can cause varicose veins.
40. Sugar can elevate glucose and insulin responses in oral contraception users.
41. Sugar can lead to periodontal disease.
42. Sugar can contribute to osteoporosis.
43. Sugar contributes to saliva acidity.
44. Sugar can cause a decrease in insulin sensitivity.
45. Sugar leads to a decreased glucose tolerance.
46. Sugar can decrease growth hormone.
47. Sugar can increase total cholesterol.
48. Sugar can increase systolic blood pressure.
49. Sugar can change the structure of protein causing interference with protein absorption.
50. Sugar causes food allergies.
51. Sugar can contribute to diabetes.
52. Sugar can cause toxemia during pregnancy.
53. Sugar can contribute to eczema in children.
54. Sugar can cause cardiovascular disease.
55. Sugar can impair the structure of DNA.
56. Sugar can cause cataracts.
57. Sugar can cause emphysema.
58. Sugar can cause atherosclerosis.
59. Sugar can cause free radical formation in the bloodstream.
60. Sugar lowers the enzymes' abilities to function.
61. Sugar can cause the loss of tissue elasticity and function.
62. Sugar can cause liver cells to divide, increasing the size of the liver.
63. Sugar can increase the amount of fat in the liver.
64. Sugar can increase kidney size and produce pathological changes in the kidney.
65. Sugar can overstress the pancreas, causing damage.
66. Sugar can increase the body's fluid retention.
67. Sugar can cause constipation.
68. Sugar can cause myopia (nearsightedness).
69. Sugar can compromise the lining of the capillaries.
70. Sugar can cause hypertension.
71. Sugar can cause headaches, including migraines.
72. Sugar can cause an increase in delta, alpha, and theta brain waves, which can alter the mind's ability to think clearly.
73. Sugar can cause depression.
74. Sugar can increase insulin responses in those consuming high-sugar diets compared to low-sugar diets.
75. Sugar increases bacterial fermentation in the colon.
76. Sugar can cause hormonal imbalance.
77. Sugar can increase blood platelet adhesiveness, which increases risk of blood clots.
78. Sugar can increase the risk of Alzheimer's Disease.

AngieCakes 02-10-2010 10:06 AM

:eek:

Indychick829 02-10-2010 10:08 AM

but but but...it's "Ok in moderation"...








*please note the sarcasm in my voice over the internet.* :D

kpk 02-10-2010 10:14 AM

[QUOTE=Indychick829;13118203]but but but...it's "Ok in moderation"...:rofl::rofl::rofl:

kristina 02-10-2010 10:18 AM

Sorry, but this is a hot button topic for me :o

There are no studies (double-blind placebo) that prove that sugar causes hyperactivity.

Just sayin' :D


On the chance that it might contribute to Alzheimers, I definitely will not be ingesting it (and other carbie things) for the rest of my life, though :D


http://www.medicinenet.com/script/ma...ticlekey=52516


>snipped>

Any parent that has ever witnessed the aftermath of a child's birthday party has probably blamed sugar for the mayhem that followed the cake and ice cream. But the fact is that sugar may actually be an innocent victim of guilt by association.

Experts say the notion that sugar causes children to become hyperactive is by far the most popular example of how people believe food can affect behavior, especially among young children.

However, despite years of debate and research on the relationship between food and behavior, no major studies have been able to provide any clear scientific evidence to back up those claims.
There is elegant research demonstrating that sugar is not at all related to inattention or hyperactivity," says Mina Dulcan, MD, head of child and adolescent psychiatry at Children's Memorial Hospital in Chicago.
"It won't hurt anybody to limit their sugar," says Dulcan. "But it won't help their behavior."

Looks like there might be a study that proves that sugar DOESN'T cause hyperactivity though.....

http://www.cnn.com/HEALTH/children/9...myth.kids.wmd/


Here's more......(researching this cause I really wanted to see if there was a connection)

http://www.ehow.com/about_5300089_su...peractive.html
>snipped>

Most significantly, in December 2008, two researchers from the Indiana University School of Medicine published a widely distributed article in the British Medical Journal debunking several medical myths; first on their list was that sugar causes hyperactivity. They cited 12 "double-blind randomized controlled trials" of sugar's effects on children; none, they wrote, even those specifically addressing children diagnosed with ADHD, proved any correlation between sugar and behavior.

Wow. There's just link after link after link :stars: Ok, last one...have to get something done today other than the computer :laugh:

http://www.nytimes.com/1995/11/22/ga...l?pagewanted=1

Bodhi 02-10-2010 11:10 AM

Damn... that's a list and then some. Funny, it only has one reason to eat it - it tastes good.

nolcjunk 02-10-2010 11:40 AM

thanks for the list.

Many of the things on there are true or at least partly true but overall it is
hideously exaggerated, most of things probably don't even correlate with sugar use.

Sugar can lead to alcoholism? Wow, I didn't know that sugar was the new gateway drug.

Sugar is bad but they don't need to over dramatize its effects.

TinO 02-10-2010 12:27 PM

ok, here's the guy that put together "the list". Yes, it's extremely over exaggerated, but sugar doesnt need to cause all those problems to know it's bad, some is enough!

Straight from the writings of Dr. Victor Frank, founder/creator of Total Body Modification, here are 78 reasons to avoid sugar.

Bodhi 02-10-2010 12:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nolcjunk (Post 13118689)
Sugar can lead to alcoholism? Wow, I didn't know that sugar was the new gateway drug.

Actually, that's true. There have been many connections found between sugar and alcoholism, which isn't too surprising considering alcohol is derived from sugar and have many chemical similarities.

Many things on the list are exaggerated and some might not even be true, but enough of them are true to warrant questioning as to whether one should eat it or not, especially considering that it only has taste as advantage.

maria40nc 02-10-2010 01:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Indychick829 (Post 13118203)
but but but...it's "Ok in moderation"...

So is high fructose corn syrup. :hyst:

nolcjunk 02-10-2010 01:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bodhi (Post 13119008)
Actually, that's true. There have been many connections found between sugar and alcoholism, which isn't too surprising considering alcohol is derived from sugar and have many chemical similarities.

But, sugar doesn't lead to alcoholism. There is something else (genetics most likely) that causes messed up brain chemistry which makes you crave sugar and alcohol. They are correlated but they are both caused by something else.

Bodhi 02-10-2010 01:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nolcjunk (Post 13119121)
But, sugar doesn't lead to alcoholism. There is something else (genetics most likely) that causes messed up brain chemistry which makes you crave sugar and alcohol. They are correlated but they are both caused by something else.

True, but although yet unsubstantiated as far as I know, I think they might make that connection eventually. Addiction is a funny animal, if you feed it in one way and then stop, you risk turning it to something else that's somehow related. I had a period in my life when I started drinking beer instead of binging. Not intentionally, it just happened because I was partying a lot, and I discovered that I was binging less. But in no time at all I suddenly drank 3-4 bottles a day and sometimes a lot more, and after a couple of months I started to get worried as to where I was heading.

I don't think eating sugar makes people alcoholics per se. But I think that once you're on that path, you might go one way or another and they might greatly affect one another.

ab1ht 02-10-2010 02:25 PM

Only 78? I thought there were 146

146 Reasons Why Sugar Is Ruining Your Health

:D

TinO 02-10-2010 03:20 PM

I knew there had to be more reasons why! :laugh: Maybe I can sue the sugar companies for all my issues?

Quote:

Originally Posted by ab1ht (Post 13119524)
Only 78? I thought there were 146

146 Reasons Why Sugar Is Ruining Your Health

:D


springalong 02-10-2010 03:35 PM

Yikes!! :eek:

fawn 02-10-2010 08:27 PM

And for those of you questioning any of those very real problems contributed to by our intake of sugar, look for Nancy Appleton's 146 cited reasons sugar is ruining your health. All 146 are in fact cited.

Alcoholism and sugar are closely tied. It is well known that the recovering alcoholic is encouraged to keep hard candy in their pockets. I have 2 clients now utilizing L-Glutamine and sharing it at their meetings! It's been quite successful.

Hyperactivity is attributed to the spike in blood sugar levels

kristina 02-10-2010 10:55 PM

Fawn, with all due respect, not one study that I googled, or yahooed, or looked for said that sugar has ANY affect on kids behavior. not one :dunno:

They were double-blind placebo trials, which means no one but the person that supplied the sugar/no sugar substance knew what it was. Not the parents, kids, or study directors. Which means they couldn't be influenced by knowing whether or not sugar was in the particular child they were observing.

No one will convince me that sugar has any afffect on ADD kids, or anyone else. I have not eaten sugar for over a month now....I have adult ADD. It has not gotten any better, and I feel exactly the same as I did with sugar...except for one thing....I have MORE energy now. Go figure :laugh: I'm just as distracted, impatient, scattered as I was on sugar :dunno:

fawn 02-11-2010 09:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kristina (Post 13121040)
Fawn, with all due respect, not one study that I googled, or yahooed, or looked for said that sugar has ANY affect on kids behavior. not one :dunno:

They were double-blind placebo trials, which means no one but the person that supplied the sugar/no sugar substance knew what it was. Not the parents, kids, or study directors. Which means they couldn't be influenced by knowing whether or not sugar was in the particular child they were observing.

No one will convince me that sugar has any afffect on ADD kids, or anyone else. I have not eaten sugar for over a month now....I have adult ADD. It has not gotten any better, and I feel exactly the same as I did with sugar...except for one thing....I have MORE energy now. Go figure :laugh: I'm just as distracted, impatient, scattered as I was on sugar :dunno:

I have Adult ADD, had OCD and a tic when I was a child. (Still work to control small impulses) eliminating sugar helped me a great deal. Though while giving up the sugar, I transitioned to the highest quality of foods as well because I recognized my need for EFA balance. If you read my post correctly, you will see that I referred to blood sugar not the sugar in and of itself. Blood sugar dictates a lot! That's why we call them blood sugar highs and lows.

I'm a different person....less scattered, more focused, more efficient and most importantly, less impulsive.

Thanks to my elimination of sugar

kristina 02-11-2010 11:15 PM

Still no double-blind placebo trial studies that proves what both of us have said....me saying it hasn't affected me to eliminate sugar, and you saying it has (which are both anecdotal stories of our experiences, and don't really stand the scientific tests that say whether or not something is true) :D

The studies do not bear out that sugar causes any behavioral change in children at all. They've been trying to prove this for a long time...and there just isn't any proof out there. I googled for a pretty long time, and all I can find from any medical website, or anywhere else is that sugar is not the cause of hyperactivity :dunno:
Can you show me something somewhere that proves me wrong? :dunno:

I was reacting to this comment in your post:
Hyperactivity is attributed to the spike in blood sugar levels


That has not been proved...it just has not been proven :dunno:
Sugar in the diet can cause blood sugar levels to increase in the body, sure, but doesn't cause hyperactivity :stars:

My blood sugar is pretty even as I'm low-carbing......still am scattered and have the symptoms of ADD....

We'll just have to agree to disagree about this :shake:


I just keep finding articles...I googled Sugar Causes Hyperactivity, and there is just nothing I can find that says it does :dunno:


http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/he...-debunked.html


The idea that sugary sweets and drinks will make children hyperactive is all in their parents' heads, doctors said Photo: BLOOMBERG NEWS

At least 12 well conducted studies have examined how children react to diets with varying levels of sugar and none of them found a link with hyperactive behaviour, two professors of paediatrics have written in the British Medical Journal.
Even children who were considered 'sensitive' to sugar and those with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder did not behave differently when on high sugar or sugar free diets.

Rachel Vreeman, assistant professor of paediatrics, and Aaron Carroll, associate professor of paediatrics, both at Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, in the US, said: "Scientists have even studied how parents react to the sugar myth. When parents think their children have been given a drink containing sugar, even if it is really sugar-free, they rate their children's behaviour as more hyperactive. The differences in the children's behaviour were all in the parents' minds."
The authors examined a series of widely held medical beliefs and found others were not based on fact.

kristina 02-11-2010 11:33 PM

ADD - Attention Deficit Disorder - Hyperactivity - ADHD - Holistic Medicine

found one. On further reading though, this was an "experiment" at a school...not a scientific study...so....anectodal again.
If food additives and sugar caused hyperactivity...then why is it one or two children in a class...and not the whole population?
We'd all be sensitive to it, or a greater number of kids would have this problem IMHO.

Food Additives and Hyperactivity in Children


The Effect of Sugar, Synthetic Colorings and Flavors
on the Brain

Although the effect on behavior of these chemicals can he quite dramatic, the effect on brain processing and intelligence can also be shown to be significant. Three years before the Canyon Verde study in 1979, the schools in New York City made a basic change in the school lunch program that excluded foods with a high sugar content, as well as eliminating foods with two synthetic coloring chemicals. Within one year, the scores on standardized California achievement tests went up 8%. The school system then banned all synthetic food colorings and flavoring. The scores went up another 4%. Three years later in 1983, all foods containing BHT and BHA were removed from school lunch programs. The scores increased an additional 4%. This means that school lunch programs are decreasing the mental capacity of children by at least 16%.

Food Additives and Hyperactivity in Children

A school study on rats and the experience of the students in New York City is not the only indicator that artificial colors and preservatives are causing behavioral hyperactivity in children. Lancet, the journal of the British Medical Association, despite its allopathic orientation, reported that these substances are capable of producing hyperactivity. The journal once focused on Yellow No.5, chemically know as tartrazine, and the preservative benzoic acid, commonly found in processed foods. These two chemicals produced dramatic reactions in 79% of children. Although a direct reference could not he located, it is claimed that the Surgeon General of the United States claimed that 8,000 people die of cancer each year from synthetic chemicals in food.

ozdancer 02-12-2010 03:10 AM

I don't usually weigh-in on hot topics like this. But just wanted to mention that blood sugar is not only affected by dietary intake of sugar. ALL CARBS affect blood sugar. If you want to prove if increased blood sugar affects hyperactivity you need to study high carb V low carb diets not sugar V sugar-free.

All these sugar studies (from your quotes, I haven't read them) fail to recognise that other carbohydrates (i.e. grains, fruit, starches) have exactly the same effect in the blood stream as straight sugar - they increase blood glugose. So if the 'no-sugar' diets are affecting blood glucose levels in the same was as the control (sugar) diets because the sugar is replaced with other carbs then really their point is mute - IMHO!

harleychic 02-12-2010 04:33 AM

I was married to an alchoholic for years, and trust me there has to be a link between sugar and alchoholism (in my opinion from what I have witnessed). Every time he tried to quit drinking, he ate sugar like no other. When he went back to drinking, his sweet tooth went away. I saw this happen several times, every time actually. Just because I don't have a link to several studies doesn't mean its not true. Maybe they just haven't studied it enough or at all yet.

nolcjunk 02-12-2010 05:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by harleychic (Post 13125867)
I was married to an alchoholic for years, and trust me there has to be a link between sugar and alchoholism (in my opinion from what I have witnessed). Every time he tried to quit drinking, he ate sugar like no other. When he went back to drinking, his sweet tooth went away. I saw this happen several times, every time actually. Just because I don't have a link to several studies doesn't mean its not true. Maybe they just haven't studied it enough or at all yet.

I think sugar and alcohol fulfill similar roles in the brain and both can be abused by the same people, but sugar doesn't LEAD to alcoholism (like the article states). That is my problem with it- it is perverting the relationship between the two. Some third thing is causing problems with both, they aren't causing each other.

My main problem is that the article is twisting the relationships between things to make sugar sound scarier. We know sugar is bad, no need to make up fake causation relationships.

kristina 02-12-2010 07:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ozdancer (Post 13125751)
I don't usually weigh-in on hot topics like this. But just wanted to mention that blood sugar is not only affected by dietary intake of sugar. ALL CARBS affect blood sugar. If you want to prove if increased blood sugar affects hyperactivity you need to study high carb V low carb diets not sugar V sugar-free.All these sugar studies (from your quotes, I haven't read them) fail to recognise that other carbohydrates (i.e. grains, fruit, starches) have exactly the same effect in the blood stream as straight sugar - they increase blood glugose. So if the 'no-sugar' diets are affecting blood glucose levels in the same was as the control (sugar) diets because the sugar is replaced with other carbs then really their point is mute - IMHO!

Why don't you want to read the quotes? :dunno: The fact that sugar doesn't cause hyperactivity is all OVER the web.

The studies quoted were JUST for sugar, but it would definitely go without saying that any food, period, affects blood sugar :) Of course it does.

Still doesn't mean that carbs OR sugar causes hyperactivity, and I stand by my statement that is has never been proven yet.

:)

SugarPop 02-12-2010 07:42 AM

kristina......I totally agree about sugar NOT causing hyperactivity in children. I do, however, think that the other ingredients like food coloring etc may pose the problem and sugar is getting the blame. There are a lot of excitotoxins in foods that are being overlooked.

B

kristina 02-12-2010 08:10 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SugarPop (Post 13126645)
kristina......I totally agree about sugar NOT causing hyperactivity in children. I do, however, think that the other ingredients like food coloring etc may pose the problem and sugar is getting the blame. There are a lot of excitotoxins in foods that are being overlooked.

B

That could be true....one time when my son ate a red "otter pop" he absolutely went off the wall. I do not know for SURE that it was it, as his behavior was not the best at time (massive understatement). Anectodal, at best really.

I'm still waiting for my symptoms of ADD to improve as I'm not eating any sugar in my diet, OR carbs :p :D :dunno:

Insomniac 02-12-2010 08:14 AM

Sugar and alcohol addiction
 
I read a great book by Kathleen DeMaisons about alcohol addiction and sugar addition called "Potatoes not Prozac". She looked at alcoholics in treatment and found that many of them turned to sugar instead of alcohol; sugar does affect our brain chemistry and I do believe that for many of us susceptible to it's effects, sugar addition is very real.

kristina 02-12-2010 08:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Insomniac (Post 13126801)
I read a great book by Kathleen DeMaisons about alcohol addiction and sugar addition called "Potatoes not Prozac". She looked at alcoholics in treatment and found that many of them turned to sugar instead of alcohol; sugar does affect our brain chemistry and I do believe that for many of us susceptible to it's effects, sugar addition is very real.

My father was an alcoholic...and when he quit, he carried Snickers candy bars in his pocket. He could very well have been addicted to the sugar in his system after quiting drinking.

ShesSuperCool 02-12-2010 01:20 PM

When I first came to this board I had a three year old daughter who was diagnosed by consensus of her psychiatrist, pediatrician and the speech pathologist as autistic. She was barely verbal except for echolalia and had such bad sensory issues I didn't like taking her out in public. ANYTHING could set her off. She was severely hyperactive with tics and never slept more than a few hours. She didn't look at anyone in the eyes, not even me.

Until I started a low carb diet.

And I can't guarantee it was because she was eating what I was eating, but something changed within WEEKS with her.

After six months she was re-evaluated by the psychiatrist and he questioned the autism dx. So did her therapists. Now her dx is auditory processing disorder with a severe mixed receptive/expressive speech delay. She has sensory integration issues but they're really improving...so much she doesn't go to OT every week. She still has speech daily in a special needs preschool class but she became a completely different child in the time she was eating a low carb diet. It's like a switch was flipped. Now she eats moderate carbs but the improvement stuck. It seems to ME that her improvement had a lot to do with diet.

But I can't prove it, of course. :)

It could be coincidence. But that's really fast improvement for it to be therapy related, or just "a phase". She had symptoms of autism since she was a few months old. Then BAM at three she's suddenly a social butterfly...right after we started a radically different diet? I dunno. Even double blind studies have been disproven after more studies are done. I'd trust my own experience when it comes to carbs and my kids. I saw such a change in my (at the time) teen daughter too, who went from suicidal to almost perky...something about those carbs were affecting them both in a VERY bad way and mama KNOWS when her children change like this.

kristina 02-12-2010 01:32 PM

Well, I can't argue with that. Something did hange. Still waiting for me to be less distracted, low frustration tolerance, and all the other things that go with ADD to go away or improve :D I'll keep ya posted. wonder how long it takes? I would LOVE it to be true.

Placebo effect is very strong. Not implying that you are doing this at all. I do know that some people might be seeing an improvement just because they want one so badly. That's why the tests to be viable are done double-blind placebo.


I am glad your little one improved!!


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