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-   -   Question for Scott123 - brownies (http://www.lowcarbfriends.com/bbs/showthread.php?t=446969)

louam 09-03-2006 09:32 PM

Question for Scott123 - brownies
 
Hi Scott, I just made your brownies, Wow, they are fabulous!! I've looked high and low for a carb count on them and can't find it anywhere. The recipe says to cut the 8x8 pan into 6 brownies, that makes for a huge brownie!! Can you tell me the count on the piece or for the whole pan?
Also, do you have a web page or a place where you have your recipes posted?
Thank so much Amy

abercrombie3f 09-04-2006 06:02 AM

whats the recipe??

jackieba 09-04-2006 06:47 AM

The recipe has about 39 total net carbs using liquid splenda or 51 with granular splenda, including the 1/2 cup pecans (this is counting 2 1/2 carbs for the Erythritol). I cut mine into 9 brownies and that's a big brownie. Next time I'm going to cut into 12 or maybe even 18--these are rich, it doesn't take alot to satisfy.


Here's the recipe as posted by Scott:

Rosie, my brownie recipe is a slightly tweaked version of two similar brownie recipes, authored by Jackieba and Makeupmonsterdog. Other forums have started calling them '******ic brownies.' They're better than any brownie I've ever made, including high carb ones.

Wet

1 stick butter (salted)
2 ounces Nestle's unsweetened chocolate

2 large eggs
1/2 teaspoon vanilla
1 packet Sweet One Ace-K
13 drops sweetzfree (1/2 C. splenda equivalent)

Dry

1/2 cup Carbalose flour 50 g
1 cup polydextrose 180 g
1/4 cup granular erythritol 54 g

1/2 C. Chopped Pecans (optional)

Preheat the oven to 275 degrees. Butter an 8x8 pan.

In a large glass bowl, melt butter and chocolate in microwave, stirring every 20 seconds. Make sure chocolate is completely melted. Let chocolate cool briefly, then mix in remaining wet ingredients, whisking in eggs last.

Combine dry ingredients in a separate bowl. Whisk thoroughly to break up any clumps of carbalose. Slowly pour dry into wet while stirring. Fold in nuts if using.

Pour batter into pan and pound on counter a few times to get as much air out as possible.

Bake 80-90 minutes at 275. 20 minutes past when a toothpick comes out clean.

Cut into 6 squares. Let cool on wire rack. Store in an airtight container.

Notes

Nestle's unsweetened chocolate is far superior to Baker's brand.

This makes a dense moist brownie. For those that like their brownies on the fudgey side,

Bake 30-35 minutes at 325.

Excess air will make these brownies cakey rather than dense. The ingredients need to be well mixed, but try not to overmix/incorporate too much air. Don't be afraid to give the batter a good pounding before it goes in the oven.

The sweetener in this comes out about 1 1/4 cups. Multiple sweeteners are essential to the success of the recipe. For those that like stevia (I much prefer ace k), a packet of steviaplus can be subbed for the ace k.

binki 09-04-2006 08:23 AM

Whoa. Looking forward to trying these.
How would you say they compare to Jaideyes' version?

jackieba 09-04-2006 08:58 AM

I started out making Jaideye's recipe but DH didn't like it--that recipe had twice the unsweetened chocolate in it and less sweetner and he said it tasted kinda bitter. It also had twice the butter which to me was a little greasy. He loves the current brownies (so do I), though, which are very similar to Scott's (baked fudgey style). You'll have to try it for yourself.

sungoddess 09-04-2006 09:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by binki (Post 7428379)
Whoa. Looking forward to trying these.
How would you say they compare to Jaideyes' version?

I haven't made Jaideyes' but these are the best brownies I have ever had. I like them better than the HC version.
You have to like a dense fudge-like brownie to prefer these. The ultimate ****** is to top one of these when warm, with a plop of vanilla ice cream. OMG. Everyone loves them and no one knows they are LC!!

louam 09-04-2006 10:18 AM

Thank you Jackieba, I did cut these into 12 for a count of about 3 carbs each, liquid splenda. I needed to know because might have just eaten them one after another without ever knowing. They are that good! I baked them to the fudgey ooey gooey side, next time I might try the longer bake just to see the difference. Thank you!

Charski 09-04-2006 06:01 PM

Boy I'd sure like to try those but that much PolyD would tear me up!

binki 09-04-2006 06:34 PM

1/6 of a cup? Really? Have you tried Scott's acclimation syrup idea?

That Girl 09-04-2006 09:02 PM

binki, where do you see 1/6 of a cup of poly d? jackieba's has a cup.

scott123 09-04-2006 09:08 PM

Yes, cutting this recipe into 6 brownies makes for a fairly gargantuan brownie. At the same time, though, I think cutting 12 makes them a little small. 9 would be ideal but I have an issue with square brownies. Call me a purist, but a brownie has to be rectangular :) Maybe at some point I'll hammer out a 9x12 pan version. That shape might favor a smaller rectangular brownie. It'll increase the recipe, but these brownies freeze well.

Louam, I'm glad you like the brownies. To be fair, the recipe is so similar to Jackie's and Makeupmonsterdog's that they deserve credit at well.

I don't have a website for my recipes as of yet, but plan on having one in the near future.

Binki, during the time frame in which they were developed, Jaideye's brownies were the ultimate brownie, but with the knowledge we've acquired since, this recipe is quite a bit superior. They're one of the best brownies I've had, lc or otherwise.

Charski, how well do you tolerate isomalt? Isomalt is shaping up to be a much less laxating alternative to maltitol. An isomalt version of these would be just as good, if not better. You could try cutting the polyd in half and stretching it with some thickenthin not/sugar. That might work to create sort of a polyd lite type of product.

louam 09-04-2006 10:06 PM

This is a great brownie! Thank you to all who had a hand in it!!:clap: :clap:

I am looking forward to getting a peek in your recipe files Scott!!

Charski 09-05-2006 11:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by scott123 (Post 7430663)

Charski, how well do you tolerate isomalt? Isomalt is shaping up to be a much less laxating alternative to maltitol. An isomalt version of these would be just as good, if not better. You could try cutting the polyd in half and stretching it with some thickenthin not/sugar. That might work to create sort of a polyd lite type of product.

Scott, I've not used a lot of isomalt yet nor found products containing much of it either, but I'm definitely interested! Oh wait, isn't Diabetisweet a lot of isomalt? I've used that without much repercussion UNLESS it's been in conjunction with Polyd! I am not at home to check the package but seems to me it's mostly isomalt?? If so I'll try that in your recipe!

Binki, yep, even a tablespoon of PolyD in a serving does me in. Don't know WHY my body reacts to that one so much, maltitol in a serving size doesn't bother me at all!

snowangel9 09-05-2006 12:51 PM

Scott, which ployd do you use, the one with the sucralose or without, or does it matter? Thanks, my dh is a big brownie fan and I think he would love these!

binki 09-05-2006 08:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by annieg (Post 7430655)
binki, where do you see 1/6 of a cup of poly d? jackieba's has a cup.

(I was assuming Charski would only eat one serving...1/6 of the recipe!)

scott123 09-05-2006 11:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by boss lady (Post 7433080)
Scott, which ployd do you use, the one with the sucralose or without, or does it matter? Thanks, my dh is a big brownie fan and I think he would love these!

Definitely without sucralose.

When you replace sugar in lc desserts, you're replacing the sweetness and the texture. Some ingredients replace sweetness only (splenda, ace k, stevia) whereas other replace texture (polyd, inulin). A third group contains sweeteners that provide both texture and sweetness (sugar alcohols).

As you add sweeteners to a recipe, you're got two columns to worry about. The texture column and the sweetness column. Ideally the two will equal each other. In other words, if your recipe contains a cup's worth of sweetness, it will also contain a cup's worth of texture.

Using multiple sweeteners provides a synergistic boost in sweetening, so the sweetness column has a tendency to be disproportionally greater than the texture column. In order to balance the high level of sweetness, ingredients like polyd, which provide texture but little to no sweetening, are critical.

Polyd plus (with sucralose) gives you both texture and sweetness. When you add it to a recipe that has too much sweetness but not enough texture, it's worthless for balancing things out.

That's the complicated answer. The simple answer is the plain, sucralose free polyd allows for sweetener combining and sweetener combining makes phenomenal recipes like this one possible.

scott123 09-05-2006 11:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Charski (Post 7432782)
Scott, I've not used a lot of isomalt yet nor found products containing much of it either, but I'm definitely interested! Oh wait, isn't Diabetisweet a lot of isomalt? I've used that without much repercussion UNLESS it's been in conjunction with Polyd! I am not at home to check the package but seems to me it's mostly isomalt?? If so I'll try that in your recipe!

Yes, diabetisweet is a combination of isomalt and ace k. The amount of ace k in it makes it pretty impalatable if used as a sole sweetener, though. If you're okay with maltitol, you might want to try a 50/50 diabetisweet/maltitol mix.

Netrition will be carrying pure isomalt soon. Once they do, I'd recommend obtaining that. The ace k in the diabetisweet limits it's uses.

jackieba 09-06-2006 07:04 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by scott123 (Post 7435301)
Netrition will be carrying pure isomalt soon. Once they do, I'd recommend obtaining that. The ace k in the diabetisweet limits it's uses.


Glad to hear that Netrition is getting on board with the Isomalt.

snowangel9 09-06-2006 09:22 AM

Thanks for the reply Scott. :) I kinda get what you are saying, but I'll leave the science up to you! Thanks again!

Charski 09-06-2006 09:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by scott123 (Post 7435301)
Yes, diabetisweet is a combination of isomalt and ace k. The amount of ace k in it makes it pretty impalatable if used as a sole sweetener, though. If you're okay with maltitol, you might want to try a 50/50 diabetisweet/maltitol mix.

Netrition will be carrying pure isomalt soon. Once they do, I'd recommend obtaining that. The ace k in the diabetisweet limits it's uses.

Sigh. Scott, you are forever getting me in Dutch with DH over these multitudes of products that I NEEEEED!! :rofl:

I'm sure I'll order some and try it out....

Brendajm 09-06-2006 04:56 PM

Well I just made these and ate one warm and all I can say is YUM YUM,, they are really good. I got to get away or portion control will be right out the window. I am hoping the polyd doesnt upset me too much. So if I am reading this right you could make these with isomalt instead of the polyd?? how much isomalt compared to the one cup of polyd?? thanks again for posting this recipe

Kevinpa 09-06-2006 05:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Brendajm (Post 7438904)
how much isomalt compared to the one cup of polyd??

As far as I know, nobody has tried it yet. I have it on my to do list but have not got to it yet.

LowCarbConvert 09-06-2006 05:57 PM

Wow, I've been "out of the loop" for awhile, the last brownies I made were Jaideyes (fabulous brownie :heart:).

Now that I'm done dragging the kids all over the place for summer fun, and they are safely tucked away at school, I can finally concentrate on food. :clap:

Can't wait to try this. I only have powdered Erythritol. Does anyone know how much to sub for the granular? Can't wait to get rid of this powdered stuff and buy some granular.

But I do have some Chocolate Bonnat 100% cacao (Voiron) that needs to get used up.

Jaideyes 09-06-2006 06:05 PM

Yes please retire mine, these are amazing! :up: Thanks Scott!

Brendajm 09-07-2006 05:43 AM

how doyou store these? room temp or the fridge?

jackieba 09-07-2006 07:51 AM

Karen, if you have a scale Scott noted the weight to use. If you don't, I can measure some and get back to you.

I store mine in tupperware on the counter and haven't had any problems (they've never lasted over a week though) but the fridge might be better (less temptation if out of sight too). They also freeze well.

jackieba 09-07-2006 09:23 AM

Karen,
1/4 granular Erythritol = 1/2 cup powdered
That doesn't go with what the package says--it says 1 Tbsp=15 grams but I weighed it).

LowCarbConvert 09-07-2006 01:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jackieba (Post 7441316)
Karen,
1/4 granular Erythritol = 1/2 cup powdered
That doesn't go with what the package says--it says 1 Tbsp=15 grams but I weighed it).

Wow! That's quite a difference. No wonder my recipes aren't working.

Thank you very much. I'm making these tonight. :up:

twyx 09-07-2006 04:17 PM

Oh. My. Gawd! I just made these and subbed isomalt for half the polyd, then added a tsp. of espresso powder.

I'm going to have to hide them from the children--and myself.

Word--Don't lick the raw stuff out the bowl--almost cracked my teeth on the isomalt granules! :hyst:

jackieba 09-07-2006 05:52 PM

Karen,
Just so you know, I weighed the Erythritol then spooned it into the measuring cup and levelled off--didn't pack it down (but I did break up any big clumps before measuring--my biggest complaint on the powdered is the clumps). All I can figure is the package assumes you pack it down, but most manufacturers assume just the opposite. The weight on their pkg says 1 tbsp = 15 grams but the granular Erythritol pkg says 1 tsp = 4grams so 1 tbsp would be 12 grams and it is definitely heavier. Makes no sense.


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