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Old 07-03-2011, 04:33 AM   #1
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YOU on a Diet (2011) July - Sept.


Welcome to my world - Won't you come on in.


The previous YOU threads are here:
11) YOU on a Diet (2010), September 1 - December 31st

11) YOU on a Diet (2011) April - June

10) YOU on a Diet (2010), May 1st - August 31st

9) YOU: on a Diet (2010), Jan 1st - April 30th

8)http://www.lowcarbfriends.com/bbs/ot...-december.html

7) http://www.lowcarbfriends.com/bbs/ot...ly-august.html

6) http://www.lowcarbfriends.com/bbs/ot...il-30th-6.html

5) http://www.lowcarbfriends.com/bbs/ot...mber-31st.html

4) http://www.lowcarbfriends.com/bbs/ot...l#post10408540

3) YOU: on a Diet ( 03/01/08 - 05/31/08 )

2) http://www.lowcarbfriends.com/bbs/ot...2-29-08-a.html

1) http://www.lowcarbfriends.com/bbs/ot...-you-diet.html
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Old 07-03-2011, 04:35 AM   #2
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Dr. Mehmet C. Oz, M.D.

Dr. Oz is Vice-Chair and Professor of Surgery at Columbia University. He directs the Cardiovascular Institute and Complementary Medicine Program at New York Presbyterian Hospital.

His research interests include heart replacement surgery, minimally invasive cardiac surgery, complementary medicine, and health care policy.

He has authored over 400 original publications, book chapters, and medical books and has received several patents. He performs over 350 heart operations annually.

In addition to belonging to every major professional society for heart surgeons, Dr. Oz was elected as a Global Leaders of Tomorrow by the World Economic Forum, won the prestigious American Association for Thoracic Surgery Gross Research Scholarship, and has received an honorary doctorate from Istanbul University.

He was voted “The Best and Brightest” by Esquire Magazine and was elected one of the Doctors of the Year by Hippocrates magazine, and Healers of the Millenium by Healthy Living magazine.

He is annually elected as one of the best physicians in the USA by the Castle Connolly Guide as well as other major ranking groups.
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Old 07-03-2011, 04:37 AM   #3
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Why are Drs. Roizen and Oz so focused on waist size, not weight?
Because pounds only tell you how hefty you are. They don't say a thing about how healthy you are.

Waist size does—belly fat is linked to multiple medical problems. So does body mass index, or BMI,
a height/weight measure that estimates body fat. The healthier these numbers are, the healthier you are, especially in terms of cardiovascular disease and diabetes.

The More You Chew, the Smaller Your Pants?

Packing your sandwiches with lots of crunchy bits could be good news for your waist.

That's right. When your diet is stuffed with difficult-to-chew foods, you increase your odds of a littler middle. So stack lots of crunchy cabbage, cucumber slices, and sprouts in those wraps and subs.

Jaws of Lite

Soft, creamy foods may be a comfort, but the foods we're genetically designed for -- the hard and crunchy ones our ancestors thrived on -- are better for our health and waistlines, studies show. So give your jaw
a little workout at each meal.

Crunchy and Nutritious

The benefits of "hard" diets probably have something to do with what is usually found in hearty, chewy, crunchy foods -- less fat and calories and more fiber.

It's certainly true for chewy eggplant and mushrooms, hearty broccoli and cabbage, and crunchy apples, carrots, and leaf lettuces.
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Old 07-03-2011, 04:39 AM   #4
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Where Fat Lives
Fat is like real estate: It's all about location, location, location. And when it comes to body fat, the belly is the least desirable location.

We all have fat in three places: in our bloodstream (called triglycerides), just below the skin's surface
(called subcutaneous fat), and in a layer of tissue located inside the belly that hangs underneath the muscles of your stomach (called omentum fat).

Because omentum fat is so close to your vital organs, it's property you want to unload. It greedily intrudes on all the other structures around it, squishing the diaphragm and lungs, which makes breathing difficult, and squashing the kidneys and their blood supply.

More: Because the omentum can store fat that is quickly accessible to the liver, it can cause lousy (LDL) cholesterol and triglyceride levels to rise. It also sucks insulin out of circulation, which makes your blood sugar level climb.

But the good news is that as soon as you reduce waist-expanding omentum fat, your body starts seeing the effects.

In other words, once your body senses it's losing that fat, your body's blood-related numbers -- cholesterol, blood pressure, blood sugar -- start traveling in a healthy direction.
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Old 07-03-2011, 04:40 AM   #5
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Some of the principles:

* Make Your Eating Plan Automatic
Over a 14-day period, train yourself to make good-for-YOU menu choices. You’ll reprogram your body so YOU will be in charge of what you’re eating.

Eat three main meals, plus snacks, so you’re never hungry.
Eat the same things for breakfast and lunch almost every day. Yes, every day. People who minimize food choices lose more weight.

* Remember That Waist Is More Important Than Weight
Because of its proximity to vital organs, belly fat is the most dangerous fat you can carry, and it is one of the strongest predictors of health risks (heart disease, diabetes, and more bad stuff) associated with obesity.

Ditch the scale in favor of the tape measure.
Measure your waist and aim small: Ideal is 32½ inches or less for women and 35 inches or less for men.

* Stay Satisfied
To lose weight, you need to eat.

Eat often -- five or six times throughout the day -- so you’re constantly satisfied. Slipping into starvation mode makes your body want to store fat.

Eat plenty of fiber in the morning; it helps control afternoon cravings.

Check food labels: Don’t buy anything with more than 4 grams of saturated fat or 4 grams of any sugar (especially high-fructose corn syrup) per serving.

Sat fat is an aging fat that’s bad for your whole body, and simple sugars make you crave high-calorie foods.

Get 7 to 8 hours of sleep a night. Fatigue also makes you crave sugary foods. Why? They release the brain chemicals that a lack of sleep leaves you short on.

Eat a little healthy fat -- like a handful of walnuts -- about 20 minutes before a meal. It will take the edge off, so you won’t be tempted to overeat.

Choose elegance over force: Weight-loss battles are won when you diet smart, not hard.
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Old 07-03-2011, 04:42 AM   #6
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What Should You Eat?
As you choose from the five major food groups, focus on foods that are low in calories and high in nutrients.
Eating this way helps you get the necessary vitamins, minerals, protein, carbohydrates, and fats without getting more calories than you need to maintain your weight.

After you've kicked out nutritional felons like simple sugars and trans fats, stock your fridge, freezer, and pantry with these items:

Fruits and veggies: Aim for four servings of fruit and five servings of vegetables daily. A serving fits in the palm of your hand.

High-fiber fruits and veggies like broccoli, apples, and raspberries will help satisfy your hunger longer than low-fiber produce. Are you getting enough fruits and veggies?

Whole grains: Whole-grain breads, cereals, rice, and pasta are high in fiber and B vitamins.
They slow digestion and help keep blood-sugar levels steady.

Low-fat or nonfat dairy: Yogurt, cottage cheese, and milk provide calcium for strong bones.

Lean meats: If you eat meat, choose skinless chicken and turkey for lean protein options.
Fish is another wise choice because it's a great source of heart-healthy fats.

Nuts: Crunchy, satisfying, and full of healthful fats, an ounce of nuts per day makes the perfect snack for people managing their waists.

The best diet meets your nutritional needs and provides just enough calories to fuel your day. So if you're satisfied with your current weight, balance your daily calorie intake with your physical activity level.

If you're trying to shed a few pounds, making the kitchen switches outlined above is a great first step in getting more of the healthy-but-still-fills-you-up foods into your diet.
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Old 07-03-2011, 04:43 AM   #7
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Restock Your Fridge
The first step to getting on the path to better eating is to take stock of your pantry! Dr. Oz and Dr. Roizen say there are five ingredients that should be banned from your diet forever.

The first ingredient to avoid is hydrogenated oil, which often masquerades as partially hydrogenated oil.

Dr. Roizen says we should also eliminate sugar and high fructose corn syrup from our foods.

"We eat 63 pounds of [high fructose corn syrup] a year, which puts 33 pounds on the typical American,"
he says.

Enriched flour is the fourth ingredient to avoid.
"[Enriched] means they took all the good stuff out and put a little back," Dr. Roizen says.
In 1960, Americans didn't use enriched flour, but today we consume 63 pounds
a year, he says.

The fifth offenders are white foods —including bleached flour.

Finished clearing your kitchen of bad fats, sugars, and carbs?
Start shopping for the good-for-your-waist foods that make it easy (and automatic!) to eat right.

Include fire-extinguisher munchies -- good foods that will put out three-alarm starvation fires.
Pick up ready-to-eat snacks for those times you're likely to reach for waist-killing chips or sweets.

Our list includes almnds, peanuts, or walnuts; bags of pre-chopped fruits and veggies; dried fruit (apricots, cranberries); and edamame (soybeans -- look for microwavable bags in the frozen-food section).

Plus, snacking on edamame will boost your bone health, and munching on a handful of nuts will promote heart health.
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Old 07-03-2011, 04:44 AM   #8
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Made a Mistake? Make a YOU-Turn
Have you enjoyed a few forkfuls of a coworker's cake or picked at your friend's fries? That's OK.

You're going to make wrong turns. You're going to be tempted by not-so-good-for-YOU foods. Does that mean you should steer off the dietary cliff and fall into the fatty crevasse of destructive eating? Of course not.

Instead of falling into a defeatist mentality by drop-kicking healthy eating the moment you make one bad choice, confront it. How?

By repeating the YOU Diet Mantra:

"At the next available moment, make an authorized YOU-turn."

Say it three times, put down the tub of cookie dough, and get back on the right road.

More: What kills any regimen of healthy eating isn't the occasional brownie or slice of pizza; it's the cascade of behavior that happens after the initial indulgence.

Use the YOU Diet Mantra to steer yourself back -- and understand that you can make mistakes, but that you can correct them with some nonjudgmental coaxing. Why does it work?
* It gives you a mental crutch to carry when you're faced with difficult eating situations.
* It reminds you to be confident, to be positive, to know that the harm isn't in the first mistake,
it's in not figuring out how to deal with it.
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Old 07-03-2011, 04:45 AM   #9
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Practice Food Monogamy
Yeah, sure, variety may be the spice of life, but it also may be the death of dieting.

Having a lot of food choices is what makes us live like we're in a never-ending speed-eating contest.
But research shows that if you decrease your food choices, you'll automatically decrease your appetite and waist size.

Pick the one meal you most often rush through and automate it. For most people, lunch is the hurry-up meal.

So find a healthy lunch you like -- salad with grilled chicken and a light olive oil dressing or turkey on whole-grain bread -- and have it for lunch every day. Every day. Yes, every day.

Read why a steaming bowl of soup or a crunchy coleslaw are healthy lunch options.

More: In fact, the same old routine is the point. More and more research has found that putting a cap on the variety of foods and tastes you experience helps you control your weight. How does it work?

It seems that when you have meals with lots of diverse flavors, it takes more calories to make you feel full. That's why we tend to eat more -- to satisfy our taste buds, not our bellies -- when enjoying foods like Mexican or Indian cuisine.

We definitely don't want you to become bored, but if you make a habit of eating the same food for at least one meal a day, it'll decrease your temptations and help you stop thinking about flavor feasts.

It's one of the ways to automate your brain so that your habits follow.


I Love this 'pick-n-stick' feature. I have the same breakfast 5 - 7 days a week.
(6 walnuts, 1 egg, old fashioned oatmeal, 1 orange - or another fruit if I'm out of oranges)
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Old 07-03-2011, 04:46 AM   #10
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Diet Devotion

Worry less about which diet to try and more about whether you can stick with it.

As long as a diet provides healthful and balanced nutrition, the type of diet you choose may not matter much to your long-term goals.

In a study, researchers found that diet adherence was a much more important factor
than the kind of diet people chose when it came to how much weight people lost.



Take stock of your eating preferences and lifestyle when you choose a diet.


Your ability to stay with it long term will depend in part on how easy you find the program to maintain.
Before you revamp your diet, consider the following questions:

Does the program entail cooking or pre-prepared foods? Will you be able to eat out?
Will you eventually feel deprived by the elimination of a food group?
You'll be more likely to stick with a diet that fits easily into your lifestyle and doesn't leave you feeling deprived.

A combination of balanced, nutritious eating habits and regular exercise remains your best defense against weight gain and related chronic diseases.
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Old 07-03-2011, 04:48 AM   #11
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How to Choose the Best Diet

Feel like you've done a speed-dating experiment with every diet on the books? It might be time to think about settling down with the right one.

Which one is the right one, you ask?

Doesn't matter. High-carb, low-carb, Mediterranean . . . any will do. As long as it's heart healthy, it cuts back on calories, and you stick to it.

A Flexible Formula

In a study of four weight loss plans, the number of pounds people were able to shed didn't differ much -- as long as the diets were fairly low in saturated fat and cholesterol, were high in fiber, reduced people's calorie intake, and included 90 minutes of weekly exercise.

Each diet group also experienced better cholesterol, better blood pressure, and better triglyceride levels -- and metabolic syndrome dropped across the board.

What's Right for You?

The diets in the study had varying amounts of carbs, fat, and protein. So you don't have to pigeonhole yourself to one style of diet. Just make sure it's something you feel you can live with.
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Old 07-03-2011, 04:50 AM   #12
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• Mix It Up

More evidence is pointing to the prudence of eating a balanced diet that doesn't restrict food groups.

In a recent study, researchers concluded that both carbohydrates and protein help suppress the appetite hormone, ghrelin. Keep your menu healthy by serving up lean protein sources, such as tofu or skinless chicken, and high-fiber carbs, such as brown rice or whole-wheat pasta.

As you balance your diet with lean protein and high-fiber carbs, remember not to shun fat completely.
Your body needs nutrients from all of the major food groups to maintain optimal health. Fat is necessary for maintaining energy levels, absorbing certain nutrients, and repairing tissues.

Furthermore, eating certain kinds of fat -- such as monounsaturated fat -- is associated with a decreased risk of heart disease.

Amino acids in protein form the basic building blocks for muscle tissue and immune cells. Carbohydrates are an important energy source that supply many essential vitamins and minerals, such as folic acid from fortified grains, as well as antioxidants and phytochemicals from fruits and vegetables.

Make your meals well rounded to ensure you get the full spectrum of the nutrients you need to keep yourself healthy and satisfied.

RealAge Benefit: Eating a diverse diet that is low in calories and high in nutrients can make your RealAge as much as 4 years younger.
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Old 07-03-2011, 04:52 AM   #13
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The Mediterranean Diet
The Mediterranean diet is a modern nutritional model inspired by the traditional dietary patterns of some of the countries of the Mediterranean basin, particularly Southern Italy, Greece, Cyprus, Portugal, Turkey and Spain.

Common to the diets of these regions are a high consumption of fruit and vegetables, bread, wheat and other cereals, olive oil and fish; making them low in saturated fat and high in monounsaturated fat and dietary fiber.

A main factor in the appeal of the Mediterranean Diet is its rich, full flavored foods. Margarine and hydrogenated oils are considered bland and lacking the flavor olive oil can impart to foods. Red wine is also consumed regularly but in moderate quantities.

Although it was first publicized in 1945 by the American doctor Ancel Keys stationed in Salerno, Italy, the Mediterranean diet failed to gain widespread recognition until the 1990s.

It is based on what from the point of view of mainstream nutrition is considered a paradox: that although the people living in Mediterranean countries tend to consume relatively high amounts of fat, they have far lower rates of cardiovascular disease than in countries like the United States, where similar levels of fat consumption are found.

One of the main explanations is thought to be the large amount of olive oil used in the Mediterranean diet. Unlike the high amount of animal fats typical to the American diet, olive oil lowers cholesterol levels in the blood.

It is also known to lower blood sugar levels and blood pressure. In addition, the consumption of red wine is considered a possible factor, as it contains flavonoids with powerful antioxidant properties.

Dietary factors may be only part of the reason for the health benefits enjoyed by these cultures. Genetics, lifestyle, and environment may also be involved.

Some questions have been raised as to if the diet provides adequate amounts of all nutrients, particularly calcium and iron. Nonetheless, green vegetables, a good source of calcium and iron, are used in the Mediterranean diet as well as goat cheese (a characteristic of Malta), a good source of calcium.
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Old 07-03-2011, 04:53 AM   #14
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Old 07-03-2011, 04:56 AM   #15
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How does the Mediterranean Pyramid differ from former USDA Food Guide Pyramid?
* Both pyramids recommend eating lots of fruits, vegetables and whole grains, but the Greeks ate very little red meat, and, they consumed far more plant foods - averaging nine servings a day of antioxidant-rich vegetables.
* The Greeks ate cold water fish several times a week - another heart-healthy investment since fish contain omega-3 oils that not only reduce heart disease risk but also boost immune system functioning.
* The USDA Food Guide Pyramid groups high protein foods together and does not separate out the red meat from the heart-healthy fish and nuts.
* The Greek diet contains little of the two kinds of fats known to raise blood cholesterol levels: saturated fat and trans fat (also called "hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated oil" in the ingredients section of food labels).
The USDA Food Guide Pyramid does not make the distinction between the healthy fats like monounsaturated oils and the unhealthy fats like saturated (found mostly in red meats and tropical oils) and trans fats (found mostly in margarines, snack foods, processed peanut butter and commercial baked goods).

Both recommend limiting total fat if watching weight.

What we can learn from the Mediterranean diet about reading food labels?

Understanding the differences in kinds of fats and knowing how to read and interpret food labels can help one become a smarter food shopper.

Try natural peanut butter instead of the pasty, hydrogenated kind. Alter recipes whenever possible to replace unhealthy fats with healthy fats like olive, canola or peanut oil. Use butter very sparingly or use butter flavoring.

Don't believe "Fat Free" or "Cholesterol Free" labeling means that a the product is good for you.

Many of these items are made with hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated oils and they have "empty calories" that can raise blood triglyceride levels.
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Old 07-03-2011, 04:57 AM   #16
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Less Meat, Less You?

Research suggests a little less meat on the plate could mean less bulk on your frame.

In a study, people who consumed few or no animal products were less likely to be overweight or obese than self-identified meat eaters.

Make fresh fruit, vegetables, whole grains, and legumes your diet staples. For a protein fix, opt for low- or non-fat dairy, skinless chicken, nuts, or fish to control saturated fat intake.

Plant-based diets consisting of fruits, vegetables, legumes, and whole grains are high in fiber and nutrients and low in fat and calories, all of which may help you lose weight.

A recent study suggests that people who classify themselves as vegetarian, semivegetarian, or vegan are much less likely to be overweight or obese than meat eaters.

However, you don't need to go completely meatless if that doesn't suit your lifestyle. Just choose appropriate portion sizes and low-fat cooking methods.

A serving of meat is equal to 3 ounces, about the size of a deck of playing cards. If you eat red meat, limit consumption to no more than one serving per week.

Also, limit intake of meats high in saturated fat, such as bacon, sausage, and fatty cuts of beef.
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Old 07-03-2011, 04:59 AM   #17
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• Dining Out Dilemma
Get your priorities straight when making a move to dine out.

Research shows that for most people, healthy menu options aren't a top priority when choosing a place to dine out. Instead, most people are more focused on convenience and value.

Make your favorite dining-out venues the ones that offer lean cuts of meat, whole-grains, fresh fruit, and vegetable side dishes.

The average American eats out almost six times per week. But dining out may lead to poor eating habits if healthy menu options are not available at the restaurants you frequent. Pick venues that offer low-fat and low-calorie menu options.

When ordering, avoid foods that are fried or flavored with cream sauces or butter. Opt for grilled, baked, or broiled fish or other lean forms of protein.

Choose vegetables that are lightly steamed or sautéed in a bit of olive oil for your side dish. And substitute whole-grain breads and brown rice for white breads and white rice whenever possible.

Being conscientious about the food choices you make when dining out can help keep your healthy eating habits on track seven days a week.
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Old 07-03-2011, 05:02 AM   #18
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The Rule of 5
By Mehmet C. Oz, MD, and Michael F. Roizen, MD

Live and eat by these rules -- and get healthier, younger, and slimmer.

If any food in your home lists any of the five ingredients below in the first five ingredients on the label, don't let it near your mouth. In fact, throw it out.

1. Simple sugars: These include anything ending in -ose (like sucrose, dextrose, glucose, maltose, and fructose) as well as sugar alcohols (these end in -ol, such as sorbitol).
Even natural sugars, such as honey and molasses, are still sugar, so you should also keep them to fewer than 4 grams per serving, unless it's pure fruit (we make that exception because fruit has so many nutrients). Syrups (maple, corn, blueberry) are also simple sugars, so stay away from those, too.

2. Enriched, bleached, or refined flour: All three words mean this flour's been stripped of its nutrients. Yes, even "enriched" just means some of the stripped nutrients have been put back. Instead, look for 100% whole grains.

3. HFCS: Those four little letters stand for high-fructose corn syrup, a huge contributor to weight gain.

4. Saturated fat: This includes palm and coconut oils as well as any fat that comes from four-legged animals (butter, cheese, hamburger, lamb chops, etc.).

5. Trans fat: It's often listed on labels as partially hydrogenated vegetable oil.

Putting these into your body is like dunking your cell phone in a glass of water. It'll short out your appetite-regulating hormones, sending confusing messages to your brain about eating.

What can you make with the food that's left? Hundreds of delicious, easy meals.
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Old 07-03-2011, 05:04 AM   #19
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Gauge Your Appetite[/INDENT]
Sometimes, we eat for physical reasons -- we're genuinely hungry -- and sometimes, we eat for emotional reasons -- we're steamed at a coworker. But it's not always easy to figure out the difference.

To help, start using the YOU Diet Hunger Test. Throughout the day, judge your level of hunger using the scale below, and record it in a notebook. Try to focus on staying tuned to what your stomach is telling you, not what's happening with stress (kids going crazy), emotions (spouse is working late again), or habits (Leno equals a bag of chips).

This process will help you really feel your hunger, so you can let your stomach, not your emotions, dictate what you do.
Tank = Hungry

1/2 Tank = Edge is off
3/4 Tank = Satisfied and not hungry
Full Tank = Full and comfortable
Overflow Level S = Stuffed
Overflow Level OS = Overstuffed
Overflow Level BP = Button Pop/Exploding
Grabbing a fiber-filled fruit can help keep your hunger at bay. Find out what fruits work best.

More: Every time you find yourself reaching for the cheese sauce or cookie box, use the test to rate your hunger. Then, think about whether you're reaching for the leftover lasagna because you're truly hungry or you're eating for a reason that has absolutely nothing to do with hunger.

Aim to stay in the 3/4 to Full Tank range -- satisfied at all times. You'll get there by eating regularly throughout the day.

After applying the gauge for two weeks, you'll start to instinctively know why you're eating and, better yet, you'll train yourself to eat simply to keep your stomach -- not your emotions -- satisfied.
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Old 07-03-2011, 05:05 AM   #20
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The 3 Things You Need to Know About Soy[/INDENT]
The claims are amazing -- soy does everything from lowering cholesterol and fighting cancer to thwarting brittle bones -- but scientists are still arguing.

Let 'em. Because if you're looking for a high-protein food that's low in saturated fat (this, of course, is where cheeseburgers and steaks flame out) soy's awesome.

And hey, if it turns out that all those other claims are true, jackpot! Plus, training your taste buds to love foods that thwart aging can make your "RealAge at least 3 years younger.

So here's all you need to know:

1. Drink up. Even die-hard carnivores -- not to mention the lactose intolerant and people who just don't care for dairy -- like soymilk. (The vanilla Silk brand gets them hooked.) Just make sure it's calcium fortified. A cup of fortified has 200–400 milligrams of calcium, or 20%-40% of your recommended dietary allowance.

2. Keep it simple. Heavy-duty processing isn't any better for soy than it is for whole grains. Choose basic Asian soy foods, such as tofu, tempeh, and miso, rather than highly processed soy sausages, frozen desserts, and energy bars. Otherwise, you're likely to find the label full of cholesterol, saturated fat, sugar, and sodium.

3. Think whole beans. Soybeans -- widely known as edamame (ed-a-mommy) -- give you the purest punch of the plant's phytochemicals, especially its isoflavones. Many supermarkets now stock frozen soybeans (in and out of the pod), and some even have fresh ones.

Keeping frozen shelled beans on hand makes it easy to toss them into soups, salads, pasta, tortillas -- or a hummus recipe, made with soybeans instead of chickpeas.

I edamame.
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Old 07-03-2011, 05:06 AM   #21
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Top 5 Ways to Spice Up Your Health

Spices. Wars have been fought over them. Great explorers have sailed in pursuit of them. And gifting history was made by three wise men bearing them. Turns out that the ancients were on to something.

Research is now showing that five spices we've long savored just for their flavor are also nutritional powerhouses. Toss these overachievers into your salad or sauce and get a whopping dose of disease-preventing antioxidants along with a flavorful punch.

1. Cinnamon:
This natural germ-fighter also helps lower blood sugar, triglycerides, and cholesterol levels -- one-quarter teaspoon a day is a healthy goal. Sprinkle a little of the powder on freshly ground coffee beans when making your morning java, or try these irresistible Cinnamon Baked Apples for a low-cal dessert.

2. Thyme:
It makes it into recipes for marinades, grilled poultry, and fish by virtue of its minty, lemony flavor; it makes it onto the RealAge list of healthy herbs by virtue of its anticancer potency. It's also long been used as an antiseptic -- yep, that could be thyme oil in your mouthwash. If you've got a fresh bunch, mince some into your vinaigrette. Yum.

3. Cumin:
Concealed in your humble chili powder is one of the world's most popular spices (it's a key ingredient in Indian curries, too) and another anticancer soldier. Go exotic and add cumin to rice, grain salads, and marinades, or try this heart-healthy Ultimate Beef Chili made with chunks of fat-trimmed meat.

4. Oregano:
Thank our GIs for bringing oregano home from Italy after WWII. A food-world superpower, leaves of the herb boast 42 times more antioxidants than apples. Wow! Use oregano to add a delicate flavor to salad dressings, garlic bread, and omelets, as well as your favorite pastas.

5. Turmeric:
Called the "Queen of the Kitchen" by Indian cooks, turmeric (and its active ingredient, curcumin) has earned its crown. Studies show promise in fighting cystic fibrosis, colon cancer, arthritis, and even Alzheimer's --
is there anything this golden gal can't do? For an earthy flavor and yellow coloring, add a pinch of turmeric to rice, stew, or lentils -- hey, it might even help you remember where you left your keys last night.
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Old 07-03-2011, 05:13 AM   #22
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Asian Pyramid
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Old 07-03-2011, 05:19 AM   #23
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Stay Satisfied
To lose weight, you need to eat.

* Eat often -- five or six times throughout the day -- so you’re always satisfied. Slipping into starvation mode makes your body want to store fat.
* Eat plenty of fiber and some protein in the morning: Fiber in the morning helps control afternoon cravings; protein decreases appetite.

Add Support

Enlist a friend, family member, or new online buddy as your partner. Everyone needs encouragement -- and an occasional prod.

* After finishing your 30-minute walk every day, call a buddy or post something..
* When you start the 20-minute workout, do the same thing.

It’s Okay to Make Mistakes

As long as you quickly get back on the right road, you won’t travel too far down the wrong one. Just make
a YOU-turn to change course.

A Few Final Tips

* Check food labels. Don’t buy anything with more than 4 grams of saturated fat or 4 grams of any sugar per serving. Sat fat is an ager that’s bad for your whole body, and simple sugars make you crave high-calorie foods.
* Get 7 to 8 hours of sleep each night. Fatigue also makes you crave sugary foods. Why? They release the brain chemicals that a lack of sleep leaves you short on.
* Eat a little healthy fat -- like a handful of walnuts -- about 20 minutes before a meal. It will take the edge off, so you won’t be tempted to overeat.
* Choose elegance over force. Weight-loss battles are won when you diet smart, not hard.

From YOU: On a Diet, by RealAge experts Michael F. Roizen, MD, and Mehmet C. Oz, MD
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Old 07-03-2011, 08:20 AM   #24
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Foods That Fill You Up Without Fattening You Up
By RealAge
Want to eat more and weigh less? Think "density" when you're choosing foods.

In nutrition lingo, foods that are low in "energy density" have lots of water and fiber, but little fat and fewer calories. How do they stack up nutritionally? Just fine, according to a new study.

For example, a piece of apple pie has about 400 calories; for the same calories, you can crunch on five healthful apples -- and since one or two will fill you up, you'll skinny down. Search for lists of low energy-density foods.

When you eat more foods that are dense in everything but fat and calories -- think juicy melons, pears, cucumbers, broccoli, and berries -- it not only helps keep you slim but also revs up the nutritional quality of your diet.

When researchers compared people on low, medium, and high energy-density diets, they discovered that women who favored foods low in energy density averaged 250 fewer calories a day compared to those in the other groups; men averaged 425 fewer calories.

Yet the nutritional quality of their meals didn't suffer. In fact, they had higher intakes of vitamins A, C, and B6; folate; iron; calcium; and potassium.

In other words, eating low on the density scale isn't just good for your waist, it's good for your health; the extra fiber and nutrients fight disease as well as pounds.

Which foods are naturally dense?

The stars are fruits and veggies. So although your daily intake should include plenty of whole grains -- and some healthy fats and low-fat protein (beans, fish, lean poultry) -- replace some of these with extra veggies. Later, grab an orange or banana for a snack. Then, watch your waist whittle down.
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Old 07-03-2011, 08:23 AM   #25
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Super News About Soup
If you choose soup when hunger strikes, you could be placing yourself on the path to weight loss.

In a year long study of overweight people on a reduced-calorie diet, snacking on soup each day led to more weight loss than noshing on a calorie-equivalent amount of energy-dense snack foods.

The key difference: even though the soup and the high-energy snack had the same number of calories, the soup took up more space in people's bellies. Thus, the soup eaters felt less hungry later and ate less over the course of the day.

Snacking on foods that have a low ratio of calories to mass -- such as air-popped popcorn, vegetable broth-based soups, and fresh produce -- may help you eat fewer calories overall and aid weight loss efforts.

When incorporating soup into your weight-reduction plan, steer clear of cream-based varieties, which are high in fat and calories.

Instead, choose soups with a base of chicken broth or vegetable broth and those loaded with vegetables, kidney beans, lentils, or brown rice to keep you satisfied and help you trim down.

In a study of overweight and obese people, those who ate two servings of low-energy dense soup per day as part of a reduced-calorie diet lost an average of almost 16 pounds over the yearlong study period.

The people who ate two servings of high-energy dense snack foods per day lost an average of just over 10.5 pounds -- 35 percent less than the soup-snacking group.

RealAge Benefit: Maintaining your weight and body mass index at a desirable level can make your RealAge as much as 6 years younger.
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Old 07-03-2011, 08:24 AM   #26
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• No Free Lunches

Eat a fat-free lunch to lose weight? No way! Cutting most of the fat out of a meal doesn't do a thing to get rid of those extra pounds.

In fact, it just may add to your weight-loss woes. A Tufts University study demonstrated that eating a meal that contains too little fat actually causes a rebound effect. Five hours after study participants had eaten a very low-fat meal, they consumed 81% more calories than those participants who had eaten a higher-fat meal.

The lesson? Include a little bit of fat--preferably the healthy, unsaturated kind--at the beginning of your meals.

Spread some peanut butter on your breakfast toast. For lunch, lightly dress a salad with an olive oil-based dressing. At dinner, choose lean main dishes, such as fish, lean beef, or poultry.

Having a low body mass index--or weight-to-height ratio--is one of the things that will help keep you young. Healthful eating, in combination with exercise, is the easiest and quickest way to lose weight and to keep
your weight where it should be.

Moderation and balance are the key principles when it comes to eating for youth.


Research has shown that yo-yo dieting--repeatedly losing and gaining weight--is worse for you
than simply being overweight.



RealAge Benefit: Maintaining your weight and body mass index at a desirable level can make your RealAge
as much as 6 years younger.
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Old 07-03-2011, 08:27 AM   #27
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Eat These When You’re Starving
By Mehmet C. Oz, MD, and Michael F. Roizen, MD

Every house needs fire-extinguisher foods -- good-for-you snacks that will put out three-alarm starvation fires. Ideally, you’ll want to always be satisfied and not hungry, meaning you can go much longer without food.

But sometimes, we know, it feels as if you haven’t eaten since junior year of high school. Here’s our list of foods to reach for when that happens:

* Cut-up vegetables. Cut them, bag them, eat them. Nothing wrong with baby carrots, grape tomatoes, and broccoli florets, but if you prefer jicama, sugar snaps, and orange pepper strips, go for it.

* Sauteed vegetables. Saute them in olive oil with chopped garlic, red pepper flakes, or a good dash of turmeric. Refrigerate, and then reheat when you need a snack.

* Nuts. A handful of almonds, peanuts, or walnuts. (But just a handful; as healthy as they are, they’re still high-calorie foods.)

* Edamame. Another name for soybeans; look for microwave bags in the frozen food section.

* Soups. Once a week, make one or more of the filling YOU Soups (try Garden Harvest Soup and Quick Black Bean Soup), and store them in serving-size cups in the refrigerator.

* Steel-cut oats. If you’re worried about time in the morning, cook up a week’s worth of oatmeal -- it’s full of filling fiber -- and store in the refrigerator. That may sound as appetizing as a slice of baked wrapping paper, but reheated oats actually taste great. Add some raisins and walnuts for sweetness and crunch.
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Old 07-05-2011, 05:14 AM   #28
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Step 1: Follow the New Rules of Weight Loss
Use this 99-Second Edition of YOU: On a Diet
By Mehmet C. Oz, MD, and Michael F. Roizen, MD


The path to your new life and your new shape really is simple. Adopt these strategies and watch your body change effortlessly.
Make Your Eating Plan Automatic

Over a 14-day period, train yourself to make good-for-YOU food choices (Step 2 makes this easy). You’ll reprogram your appetite, so YOU will be in charge of what you’re eating.

* Eat three main meals, plus snacks, so you’re never hungry.
* Eat the same things for breakfast and lunch almost every day. Yes, every day. People who minimize food choices lose more weight.

Eat Deliciously

* Fill up on whole-grain carbohydrates (that includes vegetables); fiber; nuts; and lean, healthy protein such as fish, poultry, and (sparingly) lean meats.
* In a hunger emergency, chew on your favorites from this list: apples, almonds, walnuts, edamame (soybeans), sugar-free gum, chopped veggies, nonfat yogurt or cottage cheese. And water, of course.

Remember That Waist Is More Important Than Weight

Because of its proximity to vital organs, belly fat is the most dangerous fat you can carry. It is one of the strongest predictors of health risks (heart disease, diabetes, and more bad stuff) associated with obesity.

* Ditch the scale in favor of the tape measure.
* Measure your waist and aim small:
Ideal is 32 1/2 inches or less for women and 35 inches or less for men.
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Old 07-08-2011, 03:39 PM   #29
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Q. I'm a vegetarian. I've noticed that quite a few of your online recipes contain polenta. I live in the U.K. and don't know what polenta is or where to get it. Can you help please?

A. Polenta is the Italian name for boiled ground cornmeal, or what you British usually call maize meal. (For our readers in the southern United States, it's like finely ground grits.) It's A-OK for vegetarians.

When boiled and cooked, polenta has a mashed-potato consistency but it quickly firms up as it cools. Then it can be sliced and pan seared or baked.

You can buy polenta precooked (usually in a tube) or as fine or coarsely ground meal that can also be turned into corn cakes or even used as a crust for sweet or savory pies.

It is fat-free, rich in fiber, and high in iron, and it has about 100 calories per half cup (cooked). We love it smothered in roasted vegetables, spicy beans, herbed lentils, or marinara sauce. Buying polenta ready-made makes going meatless even easier.
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Last edited by jezzie; 07-08-2011 at 03:41 PM..
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Old 07-09-2011, 02:39 AM   #30
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Low-Mercury Fish Can Cut Heart Disease Risk
by Mehmet C. Oz, MD, and Michael F. Roizen, MD |

We YOU Docs are feeling awfully lighthearted about some good fish news. Chowing down on 6 ounces of omega-3-rich fish twice weekly cuts your risk of dying from heart disease by 36%. Even if the fish is high in mercury, you won't lose a bit of the age-defying protection against heart disease and stroke, as thought. Nothing fishy about that.

But don't start tossing any old seafood into your grocery cart, especially if there are infants, young children, or pregnant moms in your household. Mercury can still cause brain and kidney disorders. Use these fish facts to reel in the healthiest benefits:

Small is beautiful. When you can't recall what fish are safest, just remember this: Young, pint-sized fish have the shortest exposure to mercury in the water. They also eat fewer other fish (each step up the food chain concentrates the mercury), so they're the safest.

Go for the winners. Salmon and trout get the gold for omega-3s. But these beautiful swimmers aren't alone. Herring, sardines, flounder, haddock, cod, and canned light tuna (lower in mercury than white albacore) also deliver a winning combo of high heart-healthy omega-3s and low mercury levels.

Pair fish with fruit, seeds, and nuts. Polyphenol-rich tropical fruit, such as mango, pineapple, banana, and papaya, reduce the amount of mercury your body absorbs. Sprinkling on walnuts, flaxseeds, and canola or olive oil adds an omega-3 boost.

Avoid heavy-metal losers. Swordfish, shark, tilefish, king mackerel, marlin, orange roughy, and (just added to the list) mahimahi are mercury depots. But (good news) red snapper just came off the list!
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