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Old 12-28-2011, 08:37 AM   #1081
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Hello all,

Thank you for your kind thoughts. Amber sent me a message to check in on me. Here is what is happening.

My husband has been hospitalized since 10/24 for decompensated heart failure. They tried to discharge him once, and he was back within 48 hours. He has restrictive cardiomyopathy, the rarest form of heart failure. Basically, his heart is stiff from radiation treatments 30 years ago and cannot fill. A director that performs the heart transplants denied him due to radiation damage to his aorta, so one of the cardiologists tried to discharge him to hospice.

I have had to struggle with this. I have other hospitals reviewing his case for heart transplant. I have met with other doctors at the hospital and managed to get him back on the heart transplant committee agenda for reconsideration. They are considering a total artificial heart now, I believe as a bridge to transplant. We are not going to hear much about this until he passes testing.

He is going to go through biopsies and testing to ensure he has no exclusion factors.

Thank you again for your kind thoughts.

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Old 12-28-2011, 09:53 AM   #1082
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Ohhhhhhhhhhhh..........sorry you & your husband have been going through so much.
Thanks for the update, though.

I hope you get some good news.
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Old 12-28-2011, 10:02 AM   #1083
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K.T. thank you for letting us know what is going on. I am so sorry that you and your husband are going through this and I am sending my good vibes for a really good outcome.
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Old 12-28-2011, 12:30 PM   #1084
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KT, I'm praying and sending you all best thoughts.
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Old 12-28-2011, 06:31 PM   #1085
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KT- I am so sorry all this is going on, I will keep you and your family in my prayers that 2012 is a year of good news and the promise of transplant!
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Old 12-29-2011, 08:23 PM   #1086
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KT so good to hear from you but so sad for your struggles. The past few months must be so stressful to you and your honey.
Be sure to nurture yourself as the stress will surely wear you down.
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Old 12-30-2011, 01:19 PM   #1087
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KT - sending prayers your way. Hope things are better in the new year.
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Old 01-12-2012, 12:09 PM   #1088
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Happy New Year!

If you'd like a chuckle, Peter, at Hyperlipid, has a nice post up about a study on ketogenic diets. As usual, he exposes the mistakes.

Hope you all are having a very good week.


ETA: If you read The Art and Science of LC Living, by Phinney and Volek, could you please post a report? I'd like to know how it compares to Dr. K, Dr. B, Dr. Lutz, Dr. MacKarness, etc. Any new science, or results in healing ailments/diseases.... Thanks.

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Old 01-12-2012, 04:18 PM   #1089
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I just put the book in my Amazon cart today after reading Dr Eades blog post. Haven't actually ordered it yet but when I do I'll let you know what I think. May have to wait until I have time/money next month.
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Old 01-13-2012, 12:06 PM   #1090
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Shunsweets, thanks! I wish I had borrowed Life Without Bread through interlibrary loan, rather than buying it. I'd read such excellent reviews of it, that I had high expectations, and the book didn't measure up to those expectations. If the Phinney/Volek book gets great reviews all around the LC and Paleo forums, I may borrow it through interlibrary loan.
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Old 01-15-2012, 09:51 AM   #1091
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I've had another round of rethinking my food plan, especially considering Dr. K's emphasis on bioavailability of nourishment. This encyclopedia article shows some sample food intake:


Meals
Most people start off with three meals per day – breakfast, lunch and dinner. But after some time on the diet, they usually skip the lunch and eat only breakfast and dinner. Because the diet is low in fiber and carbohydrates and high in fats, it is easy to eat large quantities of calories at one meal without feeling stuffed. As fat is more slowly absorbed than carbohydrates and does not influence blood sugar levels, the feeling of hunger is significantly reduced, even after many hours without food. In fact, some people eat only one meal per day on this diet.

The proportions between proteins, fats and carbohydrates may differ from one meal to another, but it is recommended that the right proportions are consumed within a 24-hour period.

...Some people prefer to eat the majority of their carbohydrates for dinner, while others prefer to eat their carbohydrates alone as an evening meal (e.g. a small bowl of rice or a soup with potatoes).

Sample Phase I
Sample for the initial phase for a 175 cm individual with an ideal body weight of 70 kg.

6 egg yolks, 3 egg whites, 30 g organ meats, 100 g muscle meat, 25 g whole sardines, 100 g full fat cream, 65 g butter, 50 ml lard, 1 tbsp coconut oil, 15 g hazelnuts, 100 g potatoes, 1 piece of bread/15 ml flour, 200 g low carbohydrate vegetables and 1 cup bone stock.

Proteins 70 g, fats 210 g, carbohydrates 45 g. Ratio = 1:3.0:0.65. Energy = 2400 kcal.

Sample phase II
Sample for the long term phase for a 175 cm individual with an ideal body weight of 70 kg.

4 egg yolks, 2 egg whites, 25 g organ meats, 75 g muscle meat, 25 g whole sardines, 100 ml full fat cream, 35 g butter, 50 ml lard, 1 tbsp coconut oil, 15 g hazelnuts, 150 g potatoes, 1 piece of bread/15 ml flour, 150 g low carbohydrate vegetables, and 1 cup bone stock.

Proteins 50 g, fats 175 g, carbohydrates 55 g. Ratio: 0.7:2.5:0.8. Energy = 2000 kcal....


I've been wondering if having the muscle meat, offal, fish, and egg yolks all each day has a beneficial effect that having them spread out over the week does not.

Anyone have thoughts on this?

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Old 01-15-2012, 12:47 PM   #1092
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Auntie, who knows. This is probably YMMV.
I do know that I cannot consume all in a day. The very thought of having to worry about it causes me enough stress.

I do like the idea of having some raw egg yolk daily; hence my morning egg nog.
On the weekends when I'm working, I stop at a fast food place and get sides of sausage and eggs and just don't worry about missing or not missing nutrients, or whatever.

I don't eat much offal and what I got from the butcher when I picked up my beef is long gone.

Fish? We usually catch salmon but I could really care less about eating it once it's been frozen.

I LOVE fresh pork and just pick it up at the store when I catch a sale.

I am winding down my obsessions because I will probably not get another pastured side.
My plan for retirement is to move into an RV and go wherever which means shopping as needed and not storing.

This will be my first year w no garden since the '70's. We'll see....
My vegetable consumption is much less so I have much more room in the fridge.

So, I can only do what works for me. So I really have no idea re benefits.
I'll be interested to hear what you discover.
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Old 01-15-2012, 01:07 PM   #1093
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Jem, thanks for your post and report. Do you mind posting what you put in your egg nog? I agree about having a stress-free food plan.

Fulltime RVing does sound grand. I've seen small pots of veggies at many an RV site. I've pared down my gardening to almost RV levels.

I, too, like having more room in the fridge for meat, eggs, etc., rather than veggies and fruit. I get two weeks' worth of food easily into a small, dorm-sized fridge. The size of most RV fridges is much larger than my current fridge.

I manage eggs and meat in a day, sometimes with some fish, but it doesn't appeal to me to eat fish, eggs, muscle meat, offal, and fish all in one day.

Hope you are doing well and having a very nice Sunday.
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Old 01-15-2012, 01:23 PM   #1094
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I found this at the cybernaut site. I put the part about frequency of foods in bold type.


What should I eat?

The Optimal Nutrition model sets a strict set of rules on what should be eaten in order to obtain the maximum benefits, health and otherwise, of this dietary model. A failure to meet these rules will result in a poorer than possible gain of health benefits or even worsening of health, depending on how much one deviates from the principal proportion between nutrients and/or prescribed types of foods. The benefits of this dietary model are described elsewhere on this site. Therefore let's concentrate on the best types of foods, providing best nutrients, a person should consume to fulfill criteria of the Optimal Nutrition.
Above all, two general rules apply:
- we eat mostly what we are made of; and
- we eat well-cooked foods (with few minor exceptions), regardless of the origin (i.e. plant or animal).
From the above, it is clear that our nutrients should come from animal sources, rather than plants. That includes animal proteins and of course, animal fats.

The Best - Egg
Without a doubt, the best universal source of nutrients for humans is the chicken egg. Eggs provide both proteins and fats of the highest biological value for humans. Egg yolk contains a multitude of biologically active nutrients, including anti-atherosclerotic substances, essential unsaturated fatty acids, rare but important minerals (selenium, iodine) and vitamins. Therefore, egg yolks should be eaten liberally, with a minimum of four (4) per day.

Sources of Protein - e.g. Meats
Because farmed pork meat is the closest to human tissues biochemically, it is only logical that we should eat predominantly that kind of meat. That of course creates problems for those who for a variety of reasons will not or can not eat pork. This, however, is not a problem, since other farmed animals are also a good source of meat for humans, although their meat typically contains far less fat than pork. (Note: recently "invented" lean pork is of course not as good as meat from traditionally farmed pigs).

Poultry (farmed duck and goose meat is an exception) and particularly fish flesh (and other seafood) is not a preferred type of meat for the followers of the Optimal Nutrition, because of a low-fat content and biochemical differences compared to human tissue. When other types of meats are scarce or unavailable, these meats can be eaten, but with an addition of an appropriate amount of fat, preferably of animal origin.

It is essential that a weekly menu includes at lest one serving of offal, e.g. animal internal organs such as kidneys, liver, heart and other typically discarded tissues. In general, all animal flesh should be eaten, including connective tissues, brain and skin (pork skin). Diary products, e.g. various cheeses, can also be used as a source of proteins, but not as the principal one.

The one source of proteins we definitely do not rely on are plants. Plant-sourced proteins are of poor biological and therefore nutritional value for humans.

Sources of fat
The best without a doubt are animal fats, which contain saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats in the best proportion for the well being of humans. Saturated fats, contained for instance in butter, ghee, lard and dripping, are the best form of energy for the human body; they also play an important role in the correct functioning of the human immune system.

Animal fats also contain so-called essential polyunsaturated fatty acids and other fatty acids, which are important for human health, but only when taken in right proportions to other fats. And that crucial proportion is only found in animal fats. One of the best sources of animal fats are dairy products, e.g., various cheeses, cream and butter. But these products should contain their full complement of fat, i.e., 35% cream or 30-60% Brie. When animal fats are not available, plant-sourced fats such as olive oil and various nut oils (i.e., palm or coconut oil) offer a reasonable substitute.

However, a care should be taken to minimise the use of so-called vegetable oils (a very inappropriate name), particularly those, which contain a majority of polyunsaturated fatty acids, shown to be damaging to human health.

Sources of carbohydrates
The Optimal Nutrition model dictates that an appropriate amount of carbohydrate should be eaten every day to maintain a required for health balance between various metabolic processes.The best sources of carbohydrate are those that do not contain simple sugars, e.g., glucose or fructose, but contain a complex form of carbohydrates, i.e. starch.

The best are various vegetables, including potatoes, which are low in carbohydrate. Products rich in carbohydrates such as pasta, rice and many fruits should be avoided due to deterious effects on human digestion and metabolism. Certain fruits, particularly of a berry variety, can be used as good sources of carbohydrate, but in strictly limited amounts. Sugar should be avoided, although small amounts can be added to various dishes for taste reasons, e.g. ice cream.


Menu Example 1
The menu given below (we are citing just one of 14 from the Homo Optimus book) is based on the menu used at the Health Academy "Arkadia". It has been therefore well tested on patients who have come to "Arkadia" for 2-week long period of treatment ...

.... A careful reader should be able to notice that the menu, to some extent, does not follow the previously stated principles of the diet. IT recommends a higher proportion of protein to fat and significantly more calories. These discrepancies are intentional.
Most of the guests who visited "Arkadia" were seriously ill, often overweight. During the initial period of the treatment their bodies required more energy and more high quality protein. However, they did not need so much fat since on such a diet they were able to quickly start burning their fat and lose weight. During the 2-week period they lost on average 3.5 kg of weight. At the same time those who arrived with wasted bodies put on weight on average 2.6kg ....

.... After reaching the protein equilibrium , when the amount of ingested protein equals the amount which is excreted, one has to increase the make of fat to reach the recommended proportion of 3 grams of fat per 1 gram of protein ..... "

BREAKFAST:
Scrambled eggs with bacon, butter, pancakes, tea with lemon

2 eggs - 100g
Smoked bacon - 50g
Lard - 10g
Butter - 10g
Two Pancakes - 100g
A thin slice of a lemon

Proportions - 1:3.2:0.15
Proteins -32.3g
Fat - 103.8g
Carbohydrates - 5g

kcal : 1,010

LUNCH:
Celery cream soup, pork cutlet in bread crumbs, gherkin, chips,
juice (diluted with water)

Soup - 200ml
Pork cutlet - 110g
Lard - 10g (for frying)
Gherkin - 1 (approx. 100g)
Egg - 1/2 for bread crumbs
Two table spoons of juice per a cup of water.

Proportions - 1:2.8:1.4
Proteins - 25g
Fat -71g
Carbohydrates - 35g

kcal : 884

DINNER:
Pork hock jelly, pancakes, butter, tea

Jelly - 100g
Butter - 10g
Two Pancakes - 100g
A thin slice of a lemon
Proportions - 1:1.8:0.1
Proteins - 51g
Fat - 85g
Carbohydrates -5g

kcal : 960


DAILY TOTAL:
Proportions - 1:2.5:0.4
Proteins - 108.3g
Fat - 259.8g
Carbohydrates -45g

kcal : 2,854

Last edited by Auntie Em; 01-15-2012 at 01:26 PM..
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Old 01-15-2012, 08:57 PM   #1095
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Just last night I discovered that I LOVE beef marrow!!! Oh, it's divine!!!
I go to an Asian market and they have all sorts of interesting animal bits!!!
I got small shank bones there, cut into 2" pieces, which I haven't found elsewhere;
duck tongue & pig's ears are some of the more unusual things I've seen...

I don't have a problem with offal (in fact one of the best things I've ever eaten was tongue at a Colombian restaurant), but I don't really know how to cook it and my son is vegetarian, so I'm only cooking for myself. I've rather gotten in the habit of cooking something "major" only 2 or 3 times a week; the rest of the time I eat leftovers, eggs, broth, a bit of yogurt...things like that.

Although I've never eaten it & don't know if I would like it, it occurs to me that headcheese is the perfect "convenience food" to meet the offal recommendation. I wouldn't mind buying a variety of organ meats (if not the head itself) and preparing a large batch of it--or sausages or pâté or some other dish--if it could be canned or frozen, so that I could have a few servings per week.
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Old 01-16-2012, 05:14 AM   #1096
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Every time I hear of head cheese I think of my grandfather who lived to be 104 (a month short of 105) and was sharp as a tack up till his dying day. He loved his head cheese!!
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Old 01-16-2012, 09:22 AM   #1097
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I consume quite a bit of dairy so my eggnog is a dairy heavy breakfast.

I gel some milk in advance and have it in the fridge (I have used diluted cream, as well)
Then I combine that w whole egg/yolk, cottage cheese, stevia and some vanilla....I usually just put it all in a wide mouth jar and use my stick blender.

In the past month, I started adding some psyllium powder which has been a good thing and the fiber has not caused stomach issues the way vegies can or even psyllium that in not pulverised.

When it comes to offal, all is not equal. Heart and tongue are both muscle fiber and, while they may be a bit more vascular than liver, the nutritional value is vastly different.
Liver (and placenta) are both organs that just sit and transfer blood and nutrients. An organ that is not physically active.

Kidney is similar and I used to cook it for my dog...it smelled like I was cooking urine. Apparently, you can soak it in advance to make it give up the urine in those little ports.

I am not afraid of any meat so unless the smell is a complete turnoff, I'll try anything.
Probably the best places to find a variety of offal are ethnic markets, although, I could get kidney at many groceries in FL.
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Old 01-17-2012, 12:28 PM   #1098
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Jenny, what a great market you've found!

Cathy, did your grandfather make his own head cheese?

Jem, thanks for the eggnog info. It sounds great.


I like liver with beef bacon, with added butter. I use chives or green onions and white pepper. I find chicken liver milder than calf (veal), and calf to be milder than that from a grown cow or steer. I do find that it takes paying attention to the heat and the time so that the liver is neither undercooked nor overcooked. I cut it into small pieces and use an iron skillet. I also braise, covered, over low heat, rather than searing.
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Old 01-18-2012, 07:16 AM   #1099
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My grandfather was a farmer for a good part of his working life and probably made his own head cheese during those years but I am only guessing. When he moved into the city, I imagine he bought it and when he lived with my family at the age of 102, it was definitely store bought.
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Old 01-18-2012, 08:43 AM   #1100
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I'm still getting the vast majority of my protein from eggs. I just haven't been able to stand the idea of any offal. Then I realized that I do have pig skin in the form of the uncooked pork rinds I buy on line and microwave. They have only salt added(and far less salt than commercial pork rinds) and I eat about one serving a week. So is skin an organ meat? Or am I really grasping at straws here trying to pretend I'm eating offal. Whatever my diet is working for me. I'm slim, energetic, and keeping bgs mostly where they need to be.
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Old 01-18-2012, 09:10 AM   #1101
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Cathy, thanks for your post about your grandfather. I'm glad he was still able to get the head cheese to eat, after he stopped farming.

Shunsweets, from what I can glean from reading the things by Dr. K online, and about Dr. K's recommendations, at Hyperlipid, the crux of Dr. K's plan is: muscle meat, animal fat and butter, some cream, egg yolks, brains, liver (and kidney, stomach, lungs, etc.), and some starch for the parts of the brain that don't use ketones.

I only eat ruminant meat, as Dr. Kurt Harris' blog explains. Dr. K says that pork is the closest to human protein. Perhaps the pigs in Poland eat something other than the industrial, grain-based feed which is used in the US.

Skin is an organ, but I don't know that it is included in the list of offal. AFAIK, offal refers to internal organs and entrails. Perhaps someone at dirty carnivores knows the what and the why of offals. If I have it right, pork rinds don't have the same molecular structure as muscle meat and the internal parts.
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Old 01-18-2012, 09:16 AM   #1102
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Shunsweets, the skin is technically an organ but yes, you are grasping. Liver would be the main source for certain nutrients. The skin provides collagen, so good stuff, just different.

Still, if your plan is working then don't stress.....and eggs are, really, the perfect food.
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Old 01-18-2012, 04:30 PM   #1103
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Thanks AuntieEm and Jem.
I knew I was pushing it LOL. I eat very little pork mostly bacon and pork skin. Actually I don't much like poultry either. I do eat some beef but mostly eggs and I agree they are the perfect food.
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Old 01-27-2012, 12:15 PM   #1104
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The comments after Peter's newest post on FIRKO mice are fascinating, if anyone has the inclination to go through them. The hormones in adipocytes sending signals to the brain, ketogenic diet thoughts, etc.
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Old 01-28-2012, 08:43 AM   #1105
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Wondering how KT and hubby are doing...anyone in touch?
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Old 02-05-2012, 05:16 AM   #1106
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Jem, thanks for asking. I've been wondering, too. KT, hope you can post soon. I'm sending you all good thoughts.

Dr. Emily Deans post on Magnesium and Fibromyalgia. I've been taking magnesium malate in various amounts over the last few months, and notice it helps with general achiness, joint pain, etc. Thought you all might like to see her post. Here is an excerpt:

To summarize, magnesium deficiency can cause us to be more vulnerable to a poorly regulated stress response, and magnesium is absolutely necessary to metabolize energy efficiently. Many on a Standard American (or whatever) Diet are likely to be at least somewhat magnesium deficient. Since most magnesium is stored within cells and bones, a simple serum level generally won't tell us much. Since we die rather quickly of heart problems if our blood levels are low, our regulatory systems pull out all the stops to make sure our blood levels remain within a certain range, even if our bodies are relatively deficient.

The following excerpt from a government site, a fact sheet on magnesium.

Magnesium plays an important role in carbohydrate metabolism. It may influence the release and activity of insulin, the hormone that helps control blood glucose (sugar) levels [13]. Low blood levels of magnesium (hypomagnesemia) are frequently seen in individuals with type 2 diabetes. Hypomagnesemia may worsen insulin resistance, a condition that often precedes diabetes, or may be a consequence of insulin resistance. Individuals with insulin resistance do not use insulin efficiently and require greater amounts of insulin to maintain blood sugar within normal levels. The kidneys possibly lose their ability to retain magnesium during periods of severe hyperglycemia (significantly elevated blood glucose). The increased loss of magnesium in urine may then result in lower blood levels of magnesium [4]. In older adults, correcting magnesium depletion may improve insulin response and action [42].

Best wishes to all for a lovely Sunday morning!

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Old 02-05-2012, 06:12 AM   #1107
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Thinking of you too, KT.

Thank you Auntie Em for yet another informative post. I haven't taken magnesium for a while now. I started with natural calm and that did the opposite of calm to my gut .. so I switched to mineral water but the expense has steered me away from that source.

I am wondering if there is a 'type' of magnesium that may work for me that you could suggest? Thanks in advance.
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Old 02-05-2012, 06:58 AM   #1108
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Hi, Cathy. I was hoping I'd "run" into you here today. I take magnesium malate from Source Naturals, and also use the afibber recipe for magn.-water. I've been lax about taking the magn. and reading Dr. Deans' article prompted me to get serious about taking it.

I took at look at ItsTheWooo's blog again, today. Hadn't looked at it for a long while. She's got some great information there. One has to sift a bit, but there are many gems and very good explanations.

Hope you are doing very well.
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Old 02-05-2012, 08:10 AM   #1109
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Thank you. I happened on itsthewooo's blog today briefly. I have seen her post comments on other blogs.

I am doing ok except for some stress that is getting difficult to control - waiting for word from daughter who is in transit and had hoped to hear yesterday.... I remind myself that worry does no one any good but still difficult. Distraction seems to work best at the moment.

Thanks for asking and listening to my troubles. I do hope you are well.
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Old 02-05-2012, 08:31 AM   #1110
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Cathy, thanks for your post. I hope you hear from your daughter soon. Waiting is hard. I'm sending you lots of good thoughts.

I've been looking into the relationship between being ketogenic and what caffeine does. Am at the beginning of looking. Here is an article about what caffeine does, from Scientific American.

An excerpt:

Thus, when caffeine stops the breakdown of cAMP, its effects are prolonged, and the response throughout the body is effectively amplified. In the heart, this response prompts norepinephrine--also called noradrenalin--and a related neurotransmitter, epinephrine, to increase the rate and force of the muscle's contractions. Although the two act in concert, norepinephrine is released by sympathetic nerves near the pacemaker tissue of the heart, whereas epinephrine is released primarily by the adrenal glands. These chemical messages lead to "fight or flight" behavior. During stressful or emergency conditions, they raise the rate and force of the heart, thereby increasing the blood pressure and delivering more oxygen to the brain and other tissues.

As always, reading, and fiddling with the food plan.
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