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Old 10-27-2011, 11:04 AM   #1051
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Quite an interesting read Auntie Em - thank you for passing this on. I am appreciative of the 'focus' on hormones but the usual belief is ever present - calories in/calories out. I like that it further demonstrates the flaws in this model. Again, thanks for sharing!
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Old 10-27-2011, 11:18 AM   #1052
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I promised you guys an update--
I've lost 5lbs in 2 weeks!

Yesterday I saw 282.0 on the scale
(I wait til I've seen a number a couple of times before I change my stats,
because sometimes I regain a pound or two for a couple weeks).

I have been seeing a loss every other day or so.
If/when I get under 282, it will be the lowest number I've seen in all of 2011.
And 280.0 was the lowest number in all of 2010.
Usually I wouldn't be confident, even on LC, of being able to predict a loss,
but I really think I will see <282 soon, perhaps tomorrow!
JUDDD seems to be very effective for me and I do believe my weight will keep going down!


I hope you all are doing well.
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Old 10-27-2011, 11:22 AM   #1053
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Fantastic Jenny!! Do let us know how this continues for you!!
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Old 10-30-2011, 01:03 PM   #1054
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Jenny, congratulations!

Cathy, I, too, thought that article was worth reading. Dr. Kurt Harris' blog was what got me thinking about eating to balance hormones for weight control as well as blood sugar control, menopause symptoms, etc.

Hope you all are having a very nice Sunday.
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Old 11-01-2011, 07:56 AM   #1055
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I saw 281.0 yesterday!!!

I hope everyone made it through the storm okay.
Power is out all over the place and this means many people
(myself included) don't have heat or running water, on top of the other inconveniences!

I'm staying warm at the library today!
Take care, everyone!
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Old 11-01-2011, 08:04 AM   #1056
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Quote:
Originally Posted by piratejenny View Post
I saw 281.0 yesterday!!!

I hope everyone made it through the storm okay.
Power is out all over the place and this means many people
(myself included) don't have heat or running water, on top of the other inconveniences!

I'm staying warm at the library today!
Take care, everyone!
That is fantastic Jenny! Change your stats already!!!

Sorry to hear you are living with all that mess that the storm brought. Hope things get back to normal a.s.a.p.!!
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Old 11-01-2011, 08:58 AM   #1057
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Congratulations, Jenny.
JUDDD is a great program and I think, if you eat well, it can probably cure/control some disease and sx of aging.

One of the nice things about it is that you don't need to choose any particular plan...although, Dr J does recommend that you eat healthy food.

I tried this breifly and was sooo hungry but I realize now that DD was too low since I don't need to lose.

I may give it another go to see if it helps any of my problems.

I'd love to hear if you have any other changes besides weight loss.
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Old 11-02-2011, 05:20 AM   #1058
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Jenny- that is great that JUDDD is working for you, that has got to make you feel wonderful finally seeing that scale move!!! Good for you!! We lost power but we were lucky it was back on in a day, and cable and internet was out 3 days, what a damaging storm we had it looks like a war zone around here! Glad you are safe!
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Old 11-06-2011, 03:48 AM   #1059
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Good Morning.

Part One of a Three-Post entry here....

A very nifty blog post at Evolvify. Hope you all find it useful. Just skip to part three, if you only wish to read Andrew's conclusions. I have edited a few words and phrases, marked with brackets, [example], to make it a "G"-rated post series.

Rice, Potatoes, Wheat, and Other Plants Interfere with Human Gene Expression
Author: Andrew

Context of questionable relevance

It was exactly one year ago today that I first uttered the phrase, “paleo is a logical framework applied to modern humans, not a historical reenactment.” That idea seemed pretty straightforward to me, and it was well-received to the point of being quoted in a real life book (you should buy it, but not just for that reason). And sure, Robb and Andy misattributed it to somebody else in a podcast in the distant past, but I already forgave them for that. So here I am, still beating the drum of the paleo framework despite internal and external attempts to refute it, supersede it, minimize it, water it down, or exact (Exacto?) its death by a thousand cuts. Well folks, it still works. But really, this should come as no surprise…

“This guy is irritatingly correct, time and time again, even when he has limited evidence.” – E. O. Wilson on Charles Darwin

Maybe the blogs I read and the people I talk and listen to aren’t representative of the paleo community, and maybe I’m just imagining things, but the paleo zeitgeist has seemed rather buddy buddy with the white devils of late. Of course, I refer here to rice and the [non-sweet] potato. Support seems to come along the lines of, “potatoes/rice are starches. starch is good for you. therefore potatoes/rice are good for you”; “sure, raw potatoes/rice might have saponins or glycoalkaloids or lectins or phytates, but those compounds aren’t always bad, and they’re destroyed by cooking anyway”‘; “sure, rice is a grain, but what about population X and population Y who eat rice and don’t drop dead from these supposedly ‘toxic’ substances”; and commonly included with one of the first two, “I love potatoes/rice” or “potatoes/rice are good”. Even setting aside the restless and ubiquitous specter of The Self-Justification Diet™, there are significant problems with these arguments. I’m not going to deconstruct them at length here, but suffice it to say that they’re all logical fallacies of one stripe or another.

Even if I convince you that the individual arguments are flawed, the endeavor still wouldn’t tell you the paleo framework was correct or useful.

So rather than that, I’ll introduce recent research that those looking at things from a microscopic perspective have been missing all along. Not surprisingly, the research demonstrates proximate effects that were effectively predictable with the paleo framework.
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Old 11-06-2011, 03:49 AM   #1060
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Part Two of Three-Post Entry:

The two relevant components of the basic paleo framework are:

Humans are probabilistically less likely to be adapted to foods introduced more recently into the human diet. This applies to the potato, which is indigenous to South America, and was not available to humans in Africa, Asia, Europe, Australia, or myriad island populations, until the Spanish brought them back to Europe in the late 16th century. All of those populations have been consuming potatoes for only 300-400 (I’m being generous with that second number) years.

Because they can’t run away or fight back like animals, many plants have evolved chemical defense mechanisms. Because the ultimate goal of evolution is reproduction, and not survival, we can predict that chemical defense mechanisms are likely to be concentrated in the reproductive parts of plants. In many cases, this is the seed. Rice is a seed of a plant, and is therefore probabilistically likely to have chemical defense mechanisms.

Let the post-lectin, post-saponin, post-glycoalkaloid, post-metabolic syndrome, post-phytate era of paleo begin…


The Meat


Why miRNAs are important

As a wise man once said, “Reprogram your genes for effortless weight loss, vibrant health, and boundless energy.” Without delving into genetics, let’s just agree that gene expression is a proven concept. Roughly, your genome consists of a lot of conditional statements that result in the production of proteins which have wildly varied effects. Our genetic code is shaped by the environment in which we evolved. By matching the inputs of our environment to the conditions ‘expected’ by our genes, we may optimize the expression of our genes. Please know that this is a vast oversimplification, but is useful for thinking about our individual health and well-being.
For now, let’s just say that RNA relates to gene expression, and miRNA is short for “micro RNA”, which is just a subset of RNA.
“…the rapidly developing new field of miRNA, which plays an important role in modulating virtually all biological processes (e.g., cell proliferation, development, differentiation, adhesion, migration, interaction, and apoptosis) through its fine tuning of gene regulation.” (Sun, et al. 2010)

“miRNAs have been widely shown to modulate various critical biological processes, including differentiation, apoptosis, proliferation, the immune response, and the maintenance of cell and tissue identity. Dysregulation of miRNAs has been linked to cancer and other diseases.” (Zhang, et al. 2011)


The study


This study was recently published in the journal Nature (September 2011). It contains novel findings that miRNA from plants remains stable after cooking and digestion by humans. This plant miRNA has been found in significant quantities in human blood and tissue. Further, it has been demonstrated to interfere with human miRNA by mimicking it and binding to the receptors, then influencing gene expression in ways different from the miRNA produced naturally by our bodies.


Unless otherwise noted, all following quotations refer to Zhang, et al. 2011. Emphasis has been added by me.


Abstract:

Our previous studies have demonstrated that stable microRNAs (miRNAs) in mammalian serum and plasma are actively secreted from tissues and cells and can serve as a novel class of biomarkers for diseases, and act as signaling molecules in intercellular communication. Here, we report the surprising finding that exogenous plant miRNAs are present in the sera and tissues of various animals and that these exogenous plant miRNAs are primarily acquired orally, through food intake. MIR168a is abundant in rice and is one of the most highly enriched exogenous plant miRNAs in the sera of Chinese subjects. Functional studies in vitro and in vivo demonstrated that MIR168a could bind to the human/mouse low-density lipoprotein receptor adapter protein 1 (LDLRAP1) mRNA, inhibit LDLRAP1 expression in liver, and consequently decrease LDL removal from mouse plasma. These findings demonstrate that exogenous plant miRNAs in food can regulate the expression of target genes in mammals.

This wasn’t a gender thing:

” Upon investigation of the global miRNA expression profile in human serum, we found that exogenous plant miRNAs were consistently present in the serum of healthy… men and women.”

This effect was not tiny. Significant amounts of plant miRNA were found in humans:

“the tested plant miRNAs were clearly present in sera from humans, mice, and calves… when compared to the endogenous mammalian miRNAs known to be stably present in animal serum, these plant miRNAs were relatively lower, but in a similar concentration range.”

The following quote demonstrates that not all plant miRNA is digested. Some is digested more than others, and some is not digested at all:
“the levels of MIR168a and MIR156a, the two plant miRNAs with the highest levels in the sera of [human] subjects, and MIR166a, a plant miRNA with modest level, were assessed… MIR161, whose expression level was undetectable, served as a negative control.”

The three plant miRNAs found were present in different levels in different plants. Note that cooking influenced the miRNA content differently by specific miRNA and by plant. While levels in rice decreased dramatically with cooking, levels in wheat increased with cooking. After cooking, all MIR156a levels remained significantly high.

It is worth noting that these three plant miRNAs, MIR168a, MIR156a, and MIR166a, were detected in [rice and] other foods, including Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa pekinensis), wheat (Triticum aestivum), and potato (Solanum tuberosum).

“Interestingly, plant miRNAs were stable in cooked foods.”

“most plant miRNAs can act like RNA interference… [W]e performed bioinformatic analysis to identify any sequences in the human, mouse, or rat genome with perfect or near-perfect match to MIR168a. Approximately 50 putative target genes were identified as the target genes of MIR168a”
This known mechanism is why this study focused on MIR168a and rice:

“LDL is the major cholesterol-carrying lipoprotein of human plasma and plays an essential role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Downregulation of LDLRAP1 in the liver causes decreased endocytosis of LDL by liver cells and impairs the removal of LDL from plasma… Concomitant with a significant elevation in MIR168a levels in the livers of mice after 1 day of fresh rice feeding , LDLRAP1 expression dramatically decreased in the group of fresh rice-fed mice. In these experiments… LDL levels in mouse plasma were significantly elevated on days 3 and 7 after fresh rice feeding… the level of liver LDLRAP1 was not related to the levels of plasma cholesterol or triglycerides… the elevation of fresh rice-derived MIR168a… specifically decreased liver LDLRAP1 expression and thus caused an elevated LDL level in… plasma.”
Plant miRNAs mimic endogenous mammalian miRNA, bind to their receptors, and inhibit protein expression:

“Plant miRNAs execute their function in mammalian cells… in a fashion of mammalian miRNA…the results that MIR168a was also able to target the artificially expressed LDLRAP1 protein in 293T cells (Figure 3I-3K) strongly demonstrate that plant MIR168a could bind to its binding site located in exon 4 of mammalian LDLRAP1 gene, and then inhibit LDLRAP1 protein expression.”
Why the focus on disruptive plant foods, and not animal foods?

This was one of the biggest questions I had before and after reading the study. Unless I missed it, no specific mention is made of what happens when humans or other mammals ingest mammalian miRNA. This leaves the question open as to the scope of miRNA influence we may obtain through food. Upon closer examination, I did find one point of entry into further inquiry on this question. It seems that there is a difference across the board between mammalian miRNA and plant miRNA. This does not mean that all plants are bad to eat or that all mammals are good to eat. Nor does it mean that all plants are good to eat or that all mammals are bad to eat. It’s likely still true that there is no such thing as food and that everything we might ingest simply exists on a multi-dimensional spectrum of healthful to toxic.

“Plant miRNAs are 2′-O-methyl modified on their terminal nucleotide, which renders them resistant to periodate. In contrast, mammalian miRNAs with free 2′ and 3′ hydroxyls are sensitive to periodate… Indeed, as shown in Figure 1E, most mammalian miRNAs in human serum, such as miR-423-5p, miR-320a, miR-483-5p, miR-16, and miR-221, had an unmodified 2′, 3′ hydroxyls and were therefore oxidized… In contrast, MIR156a, MIR168a, and MIR166a in human serum remained unchanged…”

Whether mammalian miRNAs found in human serum were exogenous or endogenous is not specified. If we knew that they were exogenous, and they were oxidized, we would have a significant difference in mechanism between plant and mammal miRNA. If we assume that the mammalian miRNAs mentioned are all endogenous, we can still see a significant difference, but the question remains open as to whether ingested mammalian miRNAs remain stable after ingestion, are oxidized in the digestion process, or are metabolized via another mechanism.


Still a lot of unknowns

At this point, we can’t definitively say a lot about the effects of plant miRNAs (or mammalian for that matter). Is it possible that the cooking-

Nope.


Is it possible that there is an unknown benefit to gene expressions altered by miRNA? Sure. From an evolutionary standpoint, it’s possible that humans have adapted to use plant miRNAs as a cellular signaling mechanism to activate conditional clauses wherein different genes are expressed in order to optimize phenotypic adaptation to a plant-rich environment. What is the probability of this? It is not improbable that an organism would adapt to such a signaling mechanism given sufficient evolutionary pressure, genetic variance, and time. However, there are issues with this line of reasoning. First, in non-agricultural phases of human evolution, the plants would be engaged in an evolutionary arms race to continue to evolve their chemical defense mechanisms as humans adapted to them. Second, it currently appears that this effect does not exert acute deleterious effects on individual humans that would effect survival and reproduction enough to provide significantly strong selection pressure. Third, while time is less important than selection pressure in evolution, it remains true that a few hundred years is indeed very short in evolutionary time, and this period of time is not unknown to history. Had this sort of selection taken place, we wouldn’t have stories of the Irish potato famine (too few calories), we’d have stories of the Irish potato poisoning, in which thousands upon thousands would have died from eating potatoes (too many toxins).

There are many other unknowns. Perhaps you’ll share some in the comments.


Commonly questioned practices this study got right

There are often complaints that studies on mice cannot be extrapolated to humans. This can be a fair criticism, but is not likely to be used to mount a successful challenge to this study. Wherever ethically acceptable, humans were tested.

In particular, actual human blood and tissue samples were taken. These samples convincingly demonstrated the presence of plant miRNA in human blood and tissue in levels relatively equal to miRNA produced naturally by humans.
Further, these levels were compared against mice and calves. An example of the data is shown to the left. Note that the mice tended to demonstrate the lowest relative levels of miRNA. Humans represent the highest levels for the most relevant miRNA. Therefore, it is more reasonable to expect the effects measured in mice would be more pronounced in humans if we could control humans’ diets enough to conduct this experiment.

What conventional medicine should be saying about this study
It seems pretty simple: Rice elevates MIR168a in humans. Elevated MIR168a impairs the liver’s removal of LDL, or “bad cholesterol”. Increased LDL cholesterol causes atherosclerosis which leads to cardiovascular disease. Rice increases LDL cholesterol, and therefore, eating rice causes cardiovascular disease.

Now, I don’t completely buy into this narrative — particularly because there’s no mention of LDL particle size in this study. However, this article was published in Nature, one of the most prestigious journals on the planet, and there’s no uproar. If this study had concluded that eating red meat interferes with the liver in a way that raises “bad cholesterol”, would it not be the cover story everywhere?
How this study might fit with a paleo diet framework.

It’s hard to say anything definitive about this study beyond the convincing proof that rice miRNAs interfere with human gene expression. That said, we can use the paleo framework to make some predictions. We can predict that miRNAs that are evolutionarily novel are more likely to be deleterious to human health than beneficial. We can also suppose that even if the bulk of miRNAs are deleterious to humans, there may be a minority that are beneficial to most humans, and a few might be beneficial to humans with particular alleles.
The view that known individual components are not always harmful, and therefore shouldn’t be totally avoided, still leaves big gaps in our knowledge, and makes our daily decisions about what to eat susceptible to the undiscovered.


Paleo is bigger than lectins and phytates and saponins.


We’ve been presented with many past arguments about rice and potatoes being fine, but too high in carbohydrates to recommend for everyone.

The paleo framework is bigger than metabolic syndrome.

The more we learn about wheat, the more nefarious compounds we find.

Paleo is bigger than gluten free.

Although I personally think bok choy sucks based on taste, I never had a health reason for disliking it…

Paleo doesn’t know everything.

Potatoes and rice, still not paleo.

Last edited by Auntie Em; 11-06-2011 at 03:54 AM..
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Old 11-06-2011, 03:50 AM   #1061
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Part Three of Three-Post entry:

What I’m doing differently in light of this study


Less likely to deviate from sashimi at sushi restaurants.
Downgrading potatoes and rice from “neutral nutrient-poor waste of time” to “sneaky untrustworthy [devils]”.
Downgrading wheat from “probably a bad idea for everyone” to “all the [very bad] stuff about wheat plus the [very bad] stuff about soy”.
Downgrading bok choy from “Hey, I’m not going to eat this, would you like it?” to “I’m not [kissing] if you eat that”.


What I’m doing the same in light of this study

Preferentially consuming animal foods.
Scaling carbohydrate/starches daily in relation to activity levels
Eating carrots and sweet potatoes when I want to ingest subterranean plant storage organs (because orange is sexier than white).
Remaining skeptical of the applicability of populations isolated by geography like islands (Kitavans) and other extremes (Inuit) to humans in general.
Aping Darwin while recognizing that Science™ provides us with limited evidence for us to use in our everyday lives, yet trying to be irritatingly correct anyway.


<sarcasm>Eat your vegetables folks, particularly if you want your gene expression impaired by the plant kingdom.</sarcasm>
Final thought: Think like a geek. Eat like a hunter. Train like a fighter. Look like a model. (Play and live like you don’t live in a zoo is always implied)


References
Sun, W., Julie Li, Y.-S., Huang, H.-D., Shyy, J. Y.-J., & Chien, S. (2010). microRNA: A Master Regulator of Cellular Processes for Bioengineering Systems. Annual review of biomedical engineering, 12, 1-27. [ full-text PDF]
Zhang, L., Hou, D., Chen, X., Li, D., Zhu, L., Zhang, Y., Li, J., et al. (2011). Exogenous plant MIR168a specifically targets mammalian LDLRAP1: evidence of cross-kingdom regulation by microRNA. Cell Research, 1-20



The elderly ladies who told me in the 1950s and 1960s that if one wanted to stay slim, to pass on the bread, and to skip the sweets and starches, avoid sauces made with flour, and no dessert, still shine as lovely beacons.

Hope you all are having a very splendid Sunday morning with that extra hour.

Last edited by Auntie Em; 11-06-2011 at 04:06 AM..
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Old 11-06-2011, 05:45 AM   #1062
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Thank you for posting this Auntie Em. Again, good reading and new ideas!!
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Old 11-08-2011, 10:09 AM   #1063
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Hi Cathy. I don't usually read Evolvify, but someone at another forum posted a link to this particular blog post and I thought it very much worth while.

Hope you are doing well.
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Old 11-10-2011, 09:39 AM   #1064
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Hi, Ladies.

If you would like to smile a lot, Peter has a very funny post up about the LIRKO mice, at Hyperlipid. I'll see if I can figure out how to post a link at this computer. I can't get the link to post, but here is the blog post. I hope it's all right to leave his abbreviations as is, without editing.


Thursday, November 10, 2011
LIRKO mice (3) The MCQ
I see the LIRKO mouse has resurfaced as a destructor of the role of insulin in obesity yet again. I've posted on the LIRKO mouse in the past so this little quizz should be quite straight forward. I skipped the questions about leptin because I felt like it.

WARNING some of the questions may have more than one correct answer.

Q1. What is the blood glucose of a LIRKO mouse after a mouthfull of chow?
a. 400mg/dl
b. 400mg/dl
c. 400mg/dl
d. WTH, no one told me LIRKO mice are intensely diabetic.

Q2. What is the urine glucose concentration of a LIRKO mouse?
a. Some
b. Quite a lot
c. More than quite a lot
d. Obesity researchers boil it down to make jam.

Q3. The liver of a LIRKO mouse has no access to glucose. Where does it source it's energy?
a. Not from glucose
b. Definitely not from glucose
c. Absolutely, definitely not from glucose
d. Where's the fat?

Q4. How much fat is there in mouse diet F9?
a. Not a lot.
b. Not a lot
e. Not a lot
d. 10%, just about enough to run the liver on, rather badly, giving early onset cirrhosis and death.

Q5. How much de novo lipogenesis (DNL) from glucose is done in the liver of a LIRKO mouse?
a. None
b. Zero
c. Zilch
d. LIRKO mouse liver can't take up glucose for anything because it has no insulin receptors. Ha ha, gotcha, this is a trick question.

Q6. If the dietary fat is used to run the liver and there is no DNL, where does the fat in adipose tissue fat come from?
a. Thin air.
b. Spontaneous generation
c. Beamed in from The Enterprise
d. A small nuclear reactor
e. It doesn't, you can't put in what you haven't got. OK, there is a smidge of DNL in adipocytes.

Q7. If a LIRKO mouse at the gym is losing more calories down the urinals (where glucose is collected for making jam) than it burns on the treadmill, why doesn't it eat more?
a. Blood glucose is 400mg/dl
b. Blood insulin is 80ng/ml
c. Both.
d. Yeugh, is that really how they make jam?

Q8. The LIRKO mouse is hyperinsulinaemic. By how much does this lower plasma free fatty acids?
a. By 40%
b. By 40%
c. By 40%
d. By only 40% because adipocytes, like the rest of the mouse, are intensely insulin resistant.
e. WTH, no one told me they had depressed FFAs.

Q9. How would the LIRKO mouse cope with a saturated fat based, intensely ketogenic diet?
a. Well
b. Really well
c. Really, really well
d. Don't ask, don't even think about it.

Q10. Obesity researchers trot out the LIRKO mouse because:
a. They want to share
b. They want to share
c. They want to share
d. Shut up and eat your carbohydrate. You need insulin to get slim. Mmmm LIRKO jam...

Peter
Posted by Peter at 6:30 AM
Labels: LIRKO mice (3) The MCQ
10 comments:
praguestepchild said...
Needs more ad hoc!

Brilliant stuff, Peter.

7:46 AM
Strontium Pup said...
This post has been removed by the author.
9:56 AM
Strontium Pup said...
I raised the depressed FFAs in the LIRKO mouse on both Stephan's and Chris Masterjohn's blogs.

Ages ago.

No reply.

WTH. I won't be eating my carbohydrates any time soon.

10:07 AM
praguestepchild said...
@Strontium

Stephan addressed it in a recent comment. "Peter's ad hoc speculation does not line up with the evidence. LIRKO mice have a normal food intake, as reported in the study I cited."

11:25 AM
FrankG said...
Why even use genetically modified mice to test the Carbohydrate Insulin Hypothesis? Why not use normal, healthy, unadulterated mice? Allow them all to feed ad-libitum on the mice-equivalent of the SAD or Western diet -- plenty of sugar, refined starches and "healthy whole grains" -- then inject half of the study with insulin to simulate chronically raised circulating insulin levels. Sit back and record any increased fat mass.

Am I missing some important point here?

11:56 AM
pablo DLS said...
im still waiting for dat insulin fairies to make me fat and sick.
maybe is all the fat @ protein i eat? hey peter i asked Paul Jaminet the other day about my 57 mg/dl fasting blood sugar
(10 hrs after eating) and he implied it was dat hi protein @ insulin so i said "but dsnt the pancreas stops secreting insulin when glucose levels drop below 83 mg/dL so my insulin levels should be kite low amayrigth?" and he just said la la la la "I don’t know why your blood glucose is low!" :/

so what do you think, hi, low? mr food reward says dat insulin is good but im not so sure...

ktahnsk

12:41 PM
Strontium Pup said...
@Stepchild

Exactly.

1:01 PM
Stargazey said...
Peter, have you thought about a career in stand-up comedy?

1:04 PM
Elliot said...
"d. Obesity researchers boil it down to make jam."

Ha! The humor makes this blog twice as good as if we only had all the science.

Thanks for all the hard work on the blog-- it's truly great.

3:33 PM
Beth said...
What Elliot said! Too funny, plus good points.
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Old 11-10-2011, 09:47 AM   #1065
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Thanks Auntie Em. I love Peter's sense of humour!! Btw, I just discovered that G.T. has a new post on his blog!! Off to read it.
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Old 11-22-2011, 01:36 PM   #1066
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Cathy, I don't read GT's blog regularly, but have looked at a bit of it.

I've pared down my blog reading since getting rid of the internet at home.

I've been enjoying your posts about GT's blog, though.

It's very quiet in this thread these days. I hope everyone is doing well and enjoying life.

I've been fiddling around with my food plan again. The last change, in the summer, was to leave out the lemon juice and use bee pollen for those times when I need a bit of extra carbs. My newest change is to go back to using half-and-half rather than hwc, as I seem to need a few more carbs, as well as finding it a continuing challenge to limit my hwc intake. (I was finding it difficult to get my 20g/CHO in each day.) I feel "cruddy" without them. And hwc is so scrumptious to me, that it's hard to be sparing with it. It's easier to avoid it for a bit, rather than continue trying to only use a few tablespoons.

Will see how I do with the lactose. Am also avoiding high fiber veggies these days, except in tiny bits and only a couple of times a week, very well cooked. I like broccoli, but I seem to digest pumpkin much more easily. (Dr. Blake Donaldson's comments about avoiding green vegetables and eating the yellow ones come to mind.)

Also, I noticed a couple of weeks ago that my body reached a new stage of better adjustment to my food plan. I think of Dr. Lutz's comment that folks who are older (or who have illnesses) can take years to adjust to LC (and especially VLC). Dr. Kurt Harris noted this on his blog, too. Anyway, this feeling better gave me further motivation to continue to read and fiddle.

Sending you all best wishes and smiles.

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Old 11-23-2011, 07:55 AM   #1067
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Hi Auntie Em! Good to see you posting. I always enjoy your info and insights. I too hope everyone is doing well and has a happy thanksgiving.

I continue to read and 'fiddle'. I am still stymied with the weight loss (or lack of) but am not gaining and am feeling pretty darn good. I recently heard Kurt Harris talk on Jimmy Moore's podcast and quite enjoyed his refreshing and common sense approach. I am looking forward to reading some of his work.
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Old 11-23-2011, 11:01 AM   #1068
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Cathy, thanks for your kind thoughts. I think that maintaining, rather than gaining, shows definite victory and success. The reading and fiddling seems to be a way of life for me.

Am sending you happy thoughts and wishes for a happy and healthy Thanksgiving.
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Old 12-18-2011, 12:27 PM   #1069
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Hello, all.

I've been thinking about something Dr. Grace posted at her blog, drbganimalpharm, at blogspot. She wrote a post on adrenal fatigue. She mentioned at one of the paleo forums that she went on the Schwarzbein adrenal protocol, had to gain weight to stabilize the adrenals, before the leptin reset would work. Then she went on the Kruse leptin reset and was able to lose weight and keep it off. Before she did the adrenal reset protocol, the leptin reset protocol wouldn't work. I think it's worthwhile reading.

Can't post the blog link, as there is an ad on it.

Hope you all are doing very well.

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Old 12-19-2011, 08:46 AM   #1070
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Auntie Em View Post
Hello, all.

I've been thinking about something Dr. Grace posted at her blog, drbganimalpharm, at blogspot. She wrote a post on adrenal fatigue. She mentioned at one of the paleo forums that she went on the Schwarzbein adrenal protocol, had to gain weight to stabilize the adrenals, before the leptin reset would work. Then she went on the Kruse leptin reset and was able to lose weight and keep it off. Before she did the adrenal reset protocol, the leptin reset protocol wouldn't work. I think it's worthwhile reading.

Can't post the blog link, as there is an ad on it.

Hope you all are doing very well.
I listened to this podcast recently and began to wonder about the 'adrenal fatigue' issue. I will go back and listen to it again. Thanks Auntie Em, for passing this on.
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Old 12-21-2011, 07:21 AM   #1071
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Cathy, I didn't know that Dr. Grace had done a podcast. I just found that post on her blog.

She mentions that the adrenal fatigue protocol is important for those who spent years on yo-yo diets and former vegetarians, which caught my eye.

If you happen on anything interesting, could you please post about it? Thanks.

I have reduced my tea intake, and find that a little caffeine helps, whether in weak tea, or decaf coffee, but that if I cross the line into the too-much zone, it causes troubles.

Have also increased my carbs to 30-40g/d, mostly in egg yolks, h&h and yoghurt from h&h, with a bit of pumpkin, along with my herbs. Have tried eating a bit of grapefruit, and the occasional parsnip. Staying very low fiber, and very low FODMAP is good for me.

Hope you are doing well.
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Old 12-24-2011, 03:32 PM   #1072
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I don't know if this summary of Dr. K's diet has been posted in this thread, or not.

...
Optimal diet

The Optimal Diet, is a low carbohydrate diet developed by Polish doctor Jan Kwasniewski. The diet uses specific proportions between proteins, fats and carbohydrates (typically a 1:2.5-3.5:0.5-0.8 weight ratio), and it emphasizes foods with "high biological value", such as butter, lard, egg yolks, pork meat and bone stocks.

The diet is claimed to partially or fully cure diseases considered untreatable by orthodox medicine, such as gastrointestinal disorders, diabetes and multiple sclerosis. Additionally the diet is widely adhered to due to its purported weight loss benefits.

It is estimated that two million people worldwide use the diet[1]. In Poland there are approximately 30 health clinics and 300 doctors that practice according to the teachings of Mr. Kwasniewski[2][3]
Contents
1 Nature of the diet
2 Implementing the diet
2.1 Initial phase
2.2 Long term phase
3 Dietary choices and meals
3.1 Meals
3.2 Sample Phase I
3.3 Sample phase II
4 Disease treatment
5 Religious and philosophical aspects
6 Criticism
7 Books
8 See also
9 Notes
10 References
11 External links
Nature of the diet
The Optimal Diet has been used in Poland since the 1970's, but has gained a broader popularity the last decade with the publication of several books by Dr. Kwasniewski.

Dr. Kwasniewski has based his theories of ideal nutrition on animal experiments (feeding different proportions of proteins, fats and carbohydrates), religious and historical scriptures (such as the Bible), the diet of traditional people past and present, human biochemistry, the composition of human milk as well as decades of personal experience as a doctor.

The diet shares some characteristics with other popular low carbohydrate diets, such as the Atkins diet, the South Beach diet and the diet advocated by Joseph Mercola. But it also implements ideas based on the Paleolithic Diet and traditional diets.

Mr. Kwasniewski would claim that his diet is more fine tuned and sophisticated than other low carbohydrate diets, and therefore has a greater potential for success where others fail. Each of the macronutrients - proteins, fats and carbohydrates - should be consumed in an ideal quantity and they should be in the ideal balance with each other.

Another characteristic of the diet is its emphasis on food with the highest possible biological value, with ready-made "spare parts". For example, it is beneficial to eat animal fats instead of carbohydrates, because three quarters of the carbohydrates most people eat are converted to fats. Furthermore, animal fats are composed of a range of semi-essential fatty acids and other components not found in plant fats, therefore it is beneficial to eat animal fats instead of vegetable fats. Some foods, such as egg yolks and liver, are particularly rich in complex building blocks the body needs, and are therefore emphasized.

The diet does include only as much carbohydrates the body needs to function optimally, usually about 50 grams daily. Starchy carbohydrates (which are composed of glucose molecules) are`preferred to fruit and milk carbohydrates (which are composed of fructose and galactose) as it saves the liver extra work.

All the extra effort the body saves in constructing complex building blocks, turn carbohydrates into fatty acids, or fruit carbohydrates into glucose, allows for energy to be spent doing tasks such as repairing the body or fighting off disease. Kwasniewski even claims that the follower of the Optimal Diet will develop a "correct brain function" and become a member of the human species with yet unknown and unfulfilled potential. This individual will be less driven by anxiety and insecurity, be more peaceful, have higher moral standards, but also be much more difficult for government, media and large corporations to control and deceive.

In his books, Kwasniewski discusses how various proportions between proteins, fats and carbohydrates impact human health. In his view a mixed diet which is composed of about 35-40% of energy as carbohydrates, is the worst of all diets because the body works best on either fats or carbohydrates. He believes that a high carbohydrate/low fat diet, such as the Japanese diet rich in seafood, rice and vegetables, can work all right, if sufficient animal proteins are provided to burn off all the carbohydrates.

Implementing the diet
Initial phase
When first implementing the diet, it is normal to start with a specific weight ratio of 1:2.5-3.5:0.5-0.8 between proteins, fats and carbohydrates. This works out to about 12% protein, 80% fat, and 8% carbohydrate in caloric percentages.

The ideal quantity of proteins is typically 1 gram per kg "ideal body weight" (IBW). An indication of IBW can be found by subtracting 100 to one’s height in cm +/-10%. A 170 cm individual, requires approximately 70+/-7 g proteins. He or she would then need about 175-245 grams fats and 35-55 gram carbohydrates.

IBW is based mainly on body shape (skeleton). A slender 170 cm Asian, could require 63 grams of protein, while a stocky 170 cm Inuit could require 77 grams. Only animal proteins are counted as "proteins".

It may be stressful to adjust from a high carbohydrate diet to a high fat diet, particularly for a diseased and aged individual. But Mr. Kwasniewski does not recommend the transition be done gradually. The time required for the body to get fully adapted to his diet may be between 2 months and 2 years.

In cases of overweight, it is sometimes necessary to use a strict 1:1.5-2.0:0.5 ratio between proteins, fats and carbohydrates the first 3-4 weeks, to encourage fat burning.

Long term phase
As an individual gets adapted to the diet and his health improves, it is recommended to reduce proteins down to about 0.6-0.8 g /kg IBW. At that time, it may be beneficial to increase carbohydrates up to about 0.8-1.0 g /kg IBW. Fat consumption may be reduced somewhat as well because the body now runs more efficiently and requires less work for repairs and disease fighting. According to Mr. Kwasniewski, the energy requirement on the Optimal Diet is 25% less than on other diets.

The need for carbohydrates varies significantly from one individual to another. Some individuals with certain diseases should keep carbohydrates at 0.5 g kg/IBW for the rest of their lives, while others may require 1.2 g/kg IBW to function optimally. A state of ketosis is not recommended. Therefore it is advisable to increase carbohydrates to the point where no ketone bodies are present in the morning urine (this can be checked with a ketostix, which is available from drug stores).

Carbohydrate consumption should not, however, exceed 100 grams daily. Mr. Kwasniewski stresses the importance of including starchy carbohydrates such as potatoes and grains if more than 50 grams of carbohydrates daily are used. It is particularly important to avoid an excess of non-starchy carbohydrates such as sugar and fruits, in the initial phase, to spare the liver from overload. In the long-term phase, the liver can tolerate more such carbohydrates as it is healthier and because protein consumption is reduced.

Dietary choices and meals
Daily, the diet can typically include about 20-40 gram organ meats (liver, kidney, brain etc), 50-150 gram muscle meats, 4-8 egg yolks and 2-4 egg whites. Fatty cheeses, cream and marrow, provides some additional proteins. It is recommended to use pork meat instead of fish, chicken, lamb, beef or game, as pork is the animal closest to humans biochemically. Although a seafood, whole small sardines are rich in ready made building blocks, and can be included in small quantities, particularly if the rest of the diet is low in omega-3 fatty acids.

Recommended fats include butter, cream, lard, marrow and other animal fats, such as duck and goose. Nuts, particularly hazelnuts, and oils from palm, palm kernel, olive and coconut can be included in small quantities.

For carbohydrates, potatoes and vegetables supplied with small quantities of grains, berries and fruits are recommended. Kwasniewski claims that more than 300 gram vegetables are unnecessary.

Salt should be strictly reduced on this diet.

Meals
Most people start off with three meals per day – breakfast, lunch and dinner. But after some time on the diet, they usually skip the lunch and eat only breakfast and dinner. Because the diet is low in fiber and carbohydrates and high in fats, it is easy to eat large quantities of calories at one meal without feeling stuffed. As fat is more slowly absorbed than carbohydrates and does not influence blood sugar levels, the feeling of hunger is significantly reduced, even after many hours without food. In fact, some people eat only one meal per day on this diet.

The proportions between proteins, fats and carbohydrates may differ from one meal to another, but it is recommended that the right proportions are consumed within a 24-hour period.

Some people prefer to eat the majority of their carbohydrates for dinner, while others prefer to eat their carbohydrates alone as an evening meal (e.g. a small bowl of rice or a soup with potatoes).

Sample Phase I
Sample for the initial phase for a 175 cm individual with an ideal body weight of 70 kg.

6 egg yolks, 3 egg whites, 30 g organ meats, 100 g muscle meat, 25 g whole sardines, 100 g full fat cream, 65 g butter, 50 ml lard, 1 tbsp coconut oil, 15 g hazelnuts, 100 g potatoes, 1 piece of bread/15 ml flour, 200 g low carbohydrate vegetables and 1 cup bone stock.

Proteins 70 g, fats 210 g, carbohydrates 45 g. Ratio = 1:3.0:0.65. Energy = 2400 kcal.

Sample phase II
Sample for the long term phase for a 175 cm individual with an ideal body weight of 70 kg.

4 egg yolks, 2 egg whites, 25 g organ meats, 75 g muscle meat, 25 g whole sardines, 100 ml full fat cream, 35 g butter, 50 ml lard, 1 tbsp coconut oil, 15 g hazelnuts, 150 g potatoes, 1 piece of bread/15 ml flour, 150 g low carbohydrate vegetables, and 1 cup bone stock.

Proteins 50 g, fats 175 g, carbohydrates 55 g. Ratio: 0.7:2.5:0.8. Energy = 2000 kcal.

Disease treatment
Main article: The Optimal Diet: Disease treatment
Mr. Kwasniewski believes that The Optimal Diet is the best possible dietary model for the human being and therefore simply following the diet will by itself offer the best possible chance for the body to heal any disease. The philosophy of The Optimal Diet is to give the body the right nutrients and in the right proportions, and then let the body distribute them as necessary. The exact need for proteins, fats and carbohydrates, may differ somewhat from one disease to another, however.

Diabetics on insulin, for example, need to follow a specific preliminary protocol when implementing the diet. They may also need to permanently keep carbohydrate consumption lower than others following the Optimal Diet. People with liver problems need to reduce proteins significantly.

Sometimes special foods that provide "spare parts" connected with a diseased organ, are recommended. People with multiple sclerosis may be recommended to eat brains several times per week, while those with osteoporosis need larger quantities of bone stocks.



...
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Old 12-24-2011, 03:37 PM   #1073
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Anyone wish to report improvements to your food plan in 2011 and what you hope for next year?

My two long-term changes in the food plan this year: January, stopped eating almond butter, using olive oil, or eating nuts regularly. (I still have a handful now and then when visiting folks, and there is nothing closer to my food plan available.) December, reduced tea intake, and am making an effort to drink beef broth instead of those additional cups of tea. Dr. B has said that folks often drink caffeine for a rise in blood sugar. So, I'm reading and fiddling with the food plan.


I've been fiddling around with my carb intake, using Lactaid (or house brand version) for a few more carbs. I add a little hwc to it. I currently like having carbs with very low fiber, and I don't get the FODMAPs symptoms from the milk with the lactase added.

Wishes/goals for next year: improve P:F:C ration and content, looking for ever better health, and a way to stay slender without restricting food intake.

Dr. K isn't keen on carbs from milk. Here's a short article on carbohydrates from the Homodiet site:

Carbohydrates are widely distributed in plants and animals, where they fulfil both structural and metabolic roles. In plants, glucose is synthesise from carbon dioxide and water by photosynthesis and stored as starch or is converted to the cellulose of the plant framework. Animals can synthesise some carbohydrate from fat and protein, but the bulk of animal carbohydrate is derived ultimately from plants.
Knowledge of the structure and properties of the carbohydrates of physiologic significance is essential to understanding their fundamental role in the economy of the mammalian organism. The sugar glucose is the most important carbohydrate. It is as glucose that the bulk of dietary carbohydrate is absorbed into the bloodstream or into which it is converted in the liver, and it is from glucose that all other carbohydrates in the body can be formed. Glucose is a major fuel of the tissues of mammals (except ruminants) and a universal fuel of the fetus. It is converted to other carbohydrates having highly specific functions, eg., glycogen for storage; ribose in nucleic acids; galactose in lactose of milk, in certain complex lipids, and in combination with protein in glycoprotein and proteoglycans.
Most carbohydrates in the diet form glucose, galactose, or fructose upon digestion. These are transported to the liver via the hepatic portal vein. Galactose and fructose are readily converted to glucose in the liver.
Glucose is specifically required by many tissues but does not have to be provided as such in the diet, since other dietary carbohydrates are readily converted to glucose, either during digestion (eg., starch) or subsequently in the liver (eg., fructose, galactose. Glucose is also formed from the glycerol moiety of fats and from glucogenic amino acids by gluconeogenesis. However, a minimum daily intake of carbohydrate (50 g) is recommended in humans to prevent ketosis and loss of muscle protein.

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Old 12-24-2011, 08:54 PM   #1074
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Hello. Long time. Anyone heard from KT? Hoping her husband is okay....and her as well.
And all of us, too.

My biggest change was giving up yogurt. It was a daily for me and sometimes more than one good size serving.
Well, guess what? I haven't had a cold sore since!! That is big since I had been plagued w them in my LC life.

I'm still just trying to improve my health. It's funny that what seems to work well for so long can change as one ages.
I turned 60 in October. My digestion is not great in the evening....is that why seniors eat at 5 pm? Am I going to become one of them. Shocking!!

Anyway, so here's to another year and may it be better than the last no matter how great the last one was!!

Cheers!
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Old 12-26-2011, 02:55 PM   #1075
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Jem, I'm glad you posted. I've been wondering how you were doing. Congratulations on finding what was triggering cold sores. Yoghurt helps keep them away for me. It's fascinating how things work so differently for each of us.

I've been in the early supper group for years. If I go out to eat at 4:30 or 5, I do notice that it is mostly the grey-hair and white-hair crowd. And supper is my smallest meal of the day.

I haven't seen any posts by KT for a while.
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Old 12-26-2011, 04:13 PM   #1076
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I ran across this, on reasons for/factors in obesity, and thought it very worthwhile:

...No, there isn't a single hypothesis that covers ALL obesity.

But much of obesity has to do with the HPA axis dysregulation.

And there are lots of super-dysregulating paths that have not been a part of our thinking and discussion here..

There are many ways for the HPA axis to get dysregulated/inflammed, as well as for brain development to get very, very skewed (brain development is use dependent.) At certain times of your life prominently, for just one, in the early teens, your brain is busy pruning what I think of as neuronal "arbors" that are not used, and developing neuronal "arbors" like wildfire that ARE used. Depending upon what your brain is exposed to, this can be a big, big deal and spawn big, big problems. Just take one simple thought...we needn't get all fancy about this. What if your brain as a 14 year old is constantly experiencing insults due to the environment that make you spew cortisol(and other juicy chemicals!) like crazy. Do you think this might affect your brain? Do you think it is possible that these brain effects could be very wipespread, ie., affect more than one "function?"

So, let's look at some that we haven't looked at -

Childhood Obesity Often Linked to Trauma |Weight Loss Surgery Channel

Let me say that with this link, I do not agree with the conclusion, but I understand that the conclusion had to be "sold" to the general public on a TV station, so it had to be greatly simplified. Perhaps you can apply your super hacker brains to what might be the effects in the brains of these people whose brains were bathed in at least cortisol, people who could be described as never feeling safe. Might they have developed some cortisol related conditions? Might an outcome of their brains being bathed in cortisol ad infinitum have led to the inflammation of the HPA that we know occurs through a variety of mechanisims, leading to probable depression, anxiety and other states originating at young ages, AND a high probability, in my opinion, of lots of endocrine system disruption/dyregulation that can greatly affect energy use and appetite/feelings of hunger?

Targeting obesity at its roots: Adverse childhood experience

In this link, I think that their projection that trauma (think: brain changes) becomes a path to obesity for about 8% of the obese is probably conservative. But still, combine that with Lustig's identification/defining of a syndrome of vagally mediated beta cell hyperactivity that leads to insulin hypersecretion and obesity and which is treated by insulin suppression, a phenomenon which may occur in about 20% of the obese population, and we are now batting about 28% of the obese population.That's a big chunk of the total.

Robert H. Lustig, MD Biography / UCSF Center for Obesity Assessment, Study&Treatment (COAST)

Now, take a think on the following...The purpose of this "answer" (the entire post, including all of the above) is not to be an "answer." It is to broaden the thought pool for thinking about the question.

"This study not only confirms that ADHD is a highly prevalent condition in severely obese patients, but that the treatment of ADHD is associated with significant long-term weight loss in individuals with a lengthy history of weight loss failure.

Levy suggests, as I did in earlier postings on this topic, that ADHD should be considered as a primary cause of weight loss failure in obese patients."

Still More on ADHD and Obesity | Dr. Sharma's Obesity Notes

"Attention deficit disorder with or without hyperactivity (ADD or ADHD) and impulsiveness has been associated with increased risk for weight gain in both children and adults. In one study, ADHD was present in over 25% of all obese patients and 40% of patients with class III obesity. Reasons for this prevalent co-morbidity are unknown, but brain dopamine or insulin receptor activity may be involved.

Patients with ADD or ADHD usually manifest a long history (since childhood) of impulsivity, lack of concentration, decreased attention, inability to complete tasks, impairment in school or work performance and social dysfunction. Being “hyperactive” in the sense of the DSM-IV diagnosis of ADHD does not prevent the development or persistence of overweight and obesity in children."

Attention Deficit Disorder | Dr. Sharma's Obesity Notes

"Regular readers will recall that almost 30% of adults with severe obesity may have signs of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and, when present, this can be a major barrier to weight management."

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for Attention Deficit Disorder | Dr. Sharma's Obesity Notes

"Childhood maltreatment or adverse experiences in five domains (emotional abuse, physical abuse, sexual abuse, emotional neglect and physical neglect) have been reported as highly prevalent in patients with binge-eating syndrome. In one study, 83% of patients with binge eating reported some form of childhood maltreatment: 59% reported emotional abuse, 36% reported physical abuse, 30% reported sexual abuse, 69% reported emotional neglect, and 49% reported physical neglect."

Abuse, Neglect and Post-Traumatic Stress | Dr. Sharma's Obesity Notes

Now, some more nice science background from one of the best of the best:

http://www.healing-arts.org/tir/perr...ion_states.pdf

And a piece of PubMed research, because PubMed excites us so:

Childhood maltreatment and psychiatric morbidity i... [Obes Surg. 2008] - PubMed - NCBI

Childhood maltreatment in extremely obese male and ... [Obes Res. 2005] - PubMed - NCBI

http://www.uppitysciencechick.com/ro...ep_obesity.pdf

For those who are prone to deeming the "psychological" to being "all in the head," be very, very clear that I disagree with you. And so does science.

With imaging, changes in the brain can be seen. Changes in the brain resulting from psychotherapy, which for too long was seen as another "all in the head" therapy, can also be seen/measured.

How Psychotherapy Changes the Brain - Psychiatric Times

And to be really, really clear, nowhere in this post am I saying that if you are or have been a significantly overweight or obese person, that YOU suffered childhood trauma, have ADHD, or have suffered other linked adverse experiences.

This is a response to the question. And as I made clear from the outset, I do not buy into any single hypothesis for obesity, though I see some as far more compelling than others.

The purpose of this answer is to broaden the thinking field.

It is not to "prove" the information that I have presented, which is simply to get the "wheels turning."

I will leave you with a favorite quote:

"If 20 million people were infected by a virus that caused anxiety, impulsivity, aggression, sleep problems, depression, respiratory and heart problems, vulnerability to substance abuse, antisocial and criminal behavior, retardation and school failure, we would consider it an urgent public health crisis.(This was written in the mid 90's. Were Perry writing it now, he'd add obesity, I am sure.)

Yet, in the United States alone, there are more than 20 million abused, neglected and traumatized children vulnerable to these problems. Our society has yet to recognize this epidemic, let alone develop an immunization strategy." - Bruce D. Perry MD., PhD, The Child Trauma Academy

....
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Old 12-26-2011, 09:03 PM   #1077
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Auntie Em,

Thank you for all your research and sharing.

I'm at a different part of my life now, with a blooming romance, but I still use my diminishing free time to follow your posts. I've said before that you are one of my heroes. I mean that.

I wish you a happy holiday season and the best of New Years.

To KT and Clackley and all the rest of the posters, I send you my best wishes. It's coming up on two years now, for me, of low carb, VLC and VVLC and they have been very healthy, happy times.

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Old 12-27-2011, 06:12 AM   #1078
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Auntie Em, I have saved the post you made so I can be sure to get at it all. Thank you so much!

Ron, so happy to hear your life has taken another happy turn and might I add what a lucky person to have found you!

To K.T. - You are missed here.
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Old 12-27-2011, 06:41 AM   #1079
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Merry Christmas and Happy New Years!!!

Auntie Em, I am totally re-evaulating my plan for the New Year, I need to drop to weight and get ready for surgery in the Spring, this last quarter of the year was spent eating and celebrating and now I know I will be able to maintain, but I have weight to lose!!! The exercise has been the biggest thing for me finally getting strict with that, and dedicating a lot of time to improving my fitness goals, I struggle finding the right level of carbs to allow me to do the workouts I do and running and still lose. I am going to bump up the exercise even more!
I do a challenge and it is going to get strict, being accountable and trying to help everyone stay on track!

I love reading your posts, I miss KT too, I hope things are OK, I think I better stalk her on facebook and see what is up.

Here is a pic I made, the first pic I was about 350, busting out of the largest plus size clothing I could find, last New Years I was about 270 so 80 pounds lost, this week I was 202 so about 70 more lost this year, the red dress is a size 12, it was a long time getting out of plus sizes, and into regular clothing. I am still unhappy with myself and need to see the journey how far I have come, but I still have a ways to go, and increasing my fitness level is big on my list, and ending the smoking for good!!!! To be smoking after all that I have done to increase my fitness is just nuts, I have to end that terrible addictive habit!

__________________
http://tickers.tickerfactory.com/ezt/t/wB47MwP/weight.png
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Old 12-27-2011, 08:24 AM   #1080
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Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 2,963
Gallery: Auntie Em
WOE: VLC-Pastoral
Start Date: Maintenance since 2000
Ron, thank you so much for your kind thoughts. You've made my day so much nicer. I'm glad that things are going so very well for you. Your success with VLC and VVLC and improving your health so splendidly are a shining example to me. Congratulations on your new SO, too. That is wondrous and grand.

Cathy, I figured that several of us here in the Dr. K thread would find that post with the links about how abuse and stress change the function of the neurochemistry to be good food for thought and of help in making choices.

Bejewelme, congratulations on all your successes! You look so beautiful. I wish you perfect victory in leaving the smoking behind. Your dedication is lovely and inspiring.

KT, hope you can post again soon.

Sending you all smiles and best thoughts for a day full of blessings.
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