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Old 05-03-2011, 09:20 AM   #361
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KT, thank you for your lovely post. You posted while I was typing and thinking and typing again.

There are some good comments at Hyperlipid on kidney stones being present before one starts a LCHF diet, and that the stones "reveal" themselves on the diet. I don't have a link handy.

Thank you for posting about the higher fat intake at the beginning and its being the primer for losing weight. This makes sense to me. I have read comments by other women saying they needed the higher fat at first. I think it healed things in me, after decades of being a vegetarian, and PUFAs. Thanks for mentioning the PUFAs again.

Hope those sweet potatoes sit well with you. Do you like parsnips? They are one of my root vegetable choices. Fried in butter, so they are crunchy, caramelized on the outside and chewy on the inside. Mmmmm.

Leo41 has posted that she eats a higher food day every few weeks. Her posts about it got me "a-thinkin'", and I do this now, too. Seems to take care of something, wish I knew what and why.

Thanks again, for your lovely post. I appreciate your taking time to offer so many useful things.
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Old 05-03-2011, 09:27 AM   #362
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KT, Groves worked really well for me w reducing pro and incr fat.
It took several years before I started having problems and it turned out to be mainly from meat fat.
I just recently made ghee and no problem there and olive oil has never caused issue.
Interesting.

Auntie Em, I also gain easily but where carbs are concerned I can eat more w better BG readings if I eat smaller, more frequent meals.
I just need to admit this to myself once and for all.
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Old 05-03-2011, 09:36 AM   #363
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Jem51, thanks for posting about the meat fat and the macronutrients.

Interesting about the ghee and olive oil. Do you clarify your own butter?

Dr. Bernstein says in his book that some can control their BG better with several smaller meals. He doesn't seem to advocate the two or three meals for type IIs who don't take insulin. He writes of exceptions to several rules, too. I'm glad you know what works well for you. That is so very much.

Thanks very much for your post. I like reading about fine tuning the food plan.


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Old 05-03-2011, 10:37 PM   #364
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Auntie Em,

I'm so glad you're enjoying the discussion! It is interesting to hear what everyone thinks and what works well.

I haven't tried parsnips. I will have to look into this!

I forgot to answer your earlier Q - I do have a crock pot. I had a pressure cooker a long time ago, but I wasn't very good with it. I ruined so many meals it was killing my budget! Heh. It would probably work great for stock broth. That would be a time saver!

Jem51 - I have the Groves book (somewhere)...I do believe something happens over time as we adapt to the diet. The lowering of protein and upping fat - I think this is key, I just can't do it without upping carbs a bit too. I am afraid to eat the carbs sometimes, so....

I just obtained a new blood glucose machine. I haven't tested in a long time. I think I need it to refine the diet and figure out what is optimal for me.
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Old 05-04-2011, 03:27 AM   #365
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KT, thanks for the pressure cooker/crock pot report.

About adapting to dietary adjustments:

I need a long time to become accustomed to even small changes. Not justing mentally accepting them, but there seems to be a needed time of physical adaptation. For example, it took several months for my elimination to adjust to not eating legumes, grains, sweet fruits, particular vegetables, etc. After that adjustment period, the bowel muscles began to work very well. Life is very nice without all that fiber.

Does anyone have a copy of Dr. Wolfgang Lutz's, "Life Without Bread"?

Someone posted a comment at Hyperlipid about Dr. Lutz saying how long it takes for adaptation to LC, and I would like to verify it.

KT, I have that wariness of increasing carbs, too. I don't like the sensation of getting an urge to eat carbs, and enjoy keeping the carbs very low. If I eat too much, even just a bite or two, it can trigger a desire to eat more. I will look in Dr. Bernstein's book to see if I can find the explanation for this. He talks about overeating, gut distension and the nerves there sending signals to raise the blood sugar. I'd like to understand more about this.

Hope you all are having a lovely start thing morning.

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Old 05-04-2011, 07:45 AM   #366
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I love my pressure cooker.
Started using it during my macrobiotic era and have never stopped. The thing is that you can easily overcook and it is better to undercook then fire it back up if necessary.
I don't use it as much since I'm not big on stews and such but for things like tongue it is ideal.
There's a guy w a paleo sit that used a pc regularly. I'll see if I can pick it out of my favs.

But really they are great for anything you want to cook quickly.

Auntie Em, I have Life without Bread and will see what I can come up with.

About making ghee; The first time I made it stove top, I browned it a little and did not want that but it is hard to control. So this time I used the oven method which is 200 for 30 min.
Only problem is that my tri ply pan slowed it down so I probably went 45 min.
Next time I will try an hour since the floating debris will get more crusty and easier to remove than a softer foam.

I am not concerned about the milk component in butter but if I don't eat it fast enough, it becomes stale tasting which does not happen w ghee.
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Old 05-04-2011, 07:51 AM   #367
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Jem, thanks very much for your post. I have a friend who makes the best pot roast in a pressure cooker.

Thanks for checking in Dr. Lutz's book. That one is on my wish list.

I've made ghee a few times, but, as butter doesn't seem to bother me, I don't care to go to the trouble of making ghee. It does taste good.

Thanks again for your post.
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Old 05-04-2011, 12:39 PM   #368
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Check this out!!!

I was listening to a Healthy Skeptic Podcast (I think it was Dr. Stephen Guyenet), and I saw something about a frozen liver pill in the notes (I didn't have time to listen to the whole thing). Really?!?!? What a cool idea for a liver whimp like me!!!

My liver pills (the body builder pills, heh) were on back order until June, so I cancelled them. I'm going to be taking frozen liver pills! I can't wait, especially after that boost from eating oysters. I am so sure I am deficient, and I have been so tired, oh I hope this is the trick for me.

I googled frozen liver pills, check out this article (first hit!) from Nourished Magazine (I have no clue what that magazine is)

= = = = =

Anti Fatigue Factor of Liver
By Joanne Hay

Taking raw liver as a superfood supplement is probably the best advice I have ever taken. I swallow about a teaspoon, frozen, cut into pillules, with a glass of raw milk and my energy level soars. This time of year is when I begin to take raw liver pills daily. In traditional chinese medicine Spring is the season the liver energy is at it’s highest, so now is the time to heal thy liver.

Lynn Razaitis, a writer and chapter for the Weston A Price Foundation reveals some interesting research on liver….

“Liver’s as-yet-unidentified anti-fatigue factor makes it a favorite with athletes and bodybuilders. The factor was described by Benjamin K. Ershoff, PhD, in a July 1951 article published in the Proceedings for the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

Ershoff divided laboratory rats into three groups. The first ate a basic diet, fortified with 11 vitamins. The second ate the same diet, along with an additional supply of vitamin B complex. The third ate the original diet, but instead of vitamin B complex received 10 percent of rations as powdered liver.

A 1975 article published in Prevention magazine described the experiment as follows: “After several weeks, the animals were placed one by one into a drum of cold water from which they could not climb out. They literally were forced to sink or swim. Rats in the first group swam for an average 13.3 minutes before giving up. The second group, which had the added fortifications of B vitamins, swam for an average of 13.4 minutes. Of the last group of rats, the ones receiving liver, three swam for 63, 83 and 87 minutes. The other nine rats in this group were still swimming vigorously at the end of two hours when the test was terminated. Something in the liver had prevented them from becoming exhausted. To this day scientists have not been able to pin a label on this anti-fatigue factor.””

From “The Liver Files” on the Weston A Price Website.

The wisdom of ancient chinese practises, where it is common to heal a complaint related to an organ by prescribing the consumption of that particular organ, corresponds to these findings. So if, like me, you are cleansing, increasing your exercise or in any way healing your liver at the moment, try raw liver. Of course, it must be organic! And be sure to freeze it for 14 days to avoid any parasitic infection (unlikely but possible). When frozen, cut it into teaspoon sized pieces and put them into little coin bags. Keep them in your freezer and when you’re after a boost, chop one into little pills to swallow. The primary benefit of swallowing liver pills frozen, is you can’t taste it. I take my liver pills with raw milk for the extra nourishment and so I don’t burp up the taste.


About the Author...
Joanne Hay, Editor of Nourished Magazine, Chief Nourisher and Mother of three is very grateful to live in Byron Bay and be able to share all she has learned about Nourishment. She has trained as an Acupuncturist (unfinished), Kinesiologist (finished) and parent (never finished). She serves the Weston A Price Foundation as a chapter leader. She loves sauerkraut, kangaroo tail stew, home made ice cream, her husband Wes and her kids Isaiah, Brynn and Ronin (in no particular order…well maybe ice cream first).
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Old 05-04-2011, 12:45 PM   #369
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Auntie Em,

I think I have Life Without Bread (somewhere), not sure. Sometimes I buy a diet book but find it is so high in carbs I set it aside or donate it.

Have you ever tried books on google? You can just google "Books on Google" then click the link, then type the book title. It is there. The whole book isn't there, but often, it is enough to get a flavor of a book to see if you want to buy it. Often, so much of the book there and what you need just might be listed.

I usually don't bother, I am a book horse (and buying them all does no good because I just end up scanning and not retaining much!).

Maybe this link will work:

Life Without Bread: How a Low ... - Google Books

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Old 05-04-2011, 12:46 PM   #370
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KT, I'm glad you've found a solution. Will it help if I eat liver and send you happy liver thoughts.

Thanks very much for the link to Dr. Lutz's book. I'll see how much I'm allowed to read.

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Old 05-04-2011, 12:48 PM   #371
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Auntie Em View Post
KT, I'm glad you've found a solution. Will it help if I eat liver and send you happy liver thoughts.
Oh, how I wish I could delegate the liver eating!!!

Heh, we cross-posted again. Don't miss the books on google post below.
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Old 05-04-2011, 12:55 PM   #372
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KT, yes, the typing and posting overlapped again.

Thanks very much for the link.

It would be grand to be able to do some things for someone else, wouldn't it? I could trade taking naps and eating liver for all kinds of things.
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Old 05-04-2011, 01:05 PM   #373
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I have 'Life Without Bread' and have not read it yet. I will get on it today!! Thanks for the reminder. I also read hyperlipid but must admit, a lot of his recent posts have been far too technical for me. I would like to read some of his older posts but just don't know where to start - he is quite prolific!! Any suggestions?

KT, interesting about the liver supps. I cooked up some beef liver for my dogs last week. I don't care for the smell usually but this time I cooked it in chicken fat and is smelled so great that I sampled some. It was really good. I know I can find grass fed without too much problem so that is on my list. I was reading about choline today and it seems to hold some promise but there was no mention that it should be from raw - I hope cooking it doesn't destroy all the benefits....

As of May 1, I have been stalled (like flat-lined) in my weight loss for 7 full months. I may have to accept that I am not going to lose any more lbs. (I need to lose another 50) but I am convinced that this is a healthy way to eat and so l/c will not change for me - there is no going back if for no other reason, I would become fatter and most certainly unhappier.
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Old 05-04-2011, 01:21 PM   #374
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Hi, Cathy. I read the title of Peter's posts, then the first line and go straight to his last paragraph. If the conclusion, question, or topic is of interest to me, I work my way through as much of the post as I can. I read all the comments and hope that someone asks him to spell out how we can apply this information to what we eat, avoid, etc. Sooner or later, someone asks the question that gets an answer I can use. Much of the science is way beyond my ken, so I read what I can and wait for the comments. He answers questions on old blog posts, so I check them, too.

I read almost everything that way. Look for the main topic, go straight to the end, and if I like it, read the parts that matter. If the person can't get to the point, or has a hidden agenda, or is too rude, I don't bother. If I like the main subject, and the last paragraph of a book is good, has clean science, no ego, etc., I read the last paragraph of each chapter. Then I look for substantiating data: charts, references, etc. Only rarely is a book worth my reading all of it. Most books could be shortened to less than one chapter.

The only blog I have read every word of, is Dr. Harris' Archevore.

My favorite low-carb books are Dr. Richard MacKarness' Eat Fat and Grow Slim, and Dr. Blake Donaldson's, Strong Medicine. The only new LC book I have found worth reading seriously is Dr. Richard Bernstein's Diabetes Solution. (I don't have Dr. Lutz's.)

Cathy, is it possible your body is healing from something and needs the nutrients in this WOE, before it is ready for you to be slimmer? KT posted something recently about that. And I have read posts at another forum by women who found that after some months, or a year, that they naturally found they wanted less fat, less food, and the whole picture changed.

If you'd like to go over any dietary specifics, I'd be glad to try to find some idea which might help. Am sending you all best thoughts.

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Old 05-04-2011, 02:16 PM   #375
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Clackley - I really agree about hanging in there with the low carb. Even if I never lose another pound, I am so much healthier than I was.

I've reversed signs of type 2 diabetes on blood testing anyway, but I know I would be right back there if I started eating the carbs in a big way.

You might be interested in this. The Healthy Skeptic is taking Q for Dr. Stephen Guyenet. A lot of people have posted their woes losing weight on paleo/primal diet. I put my sob story there too, you will probably recognize it. I can't wait to hear the podcast. I am open to ideas and am interested in the notes to follow the podcast as well.

http://thehealthyskeptic.org/stephan...your-questions


Dr. Stephan Guyenet will be joining us again on the podcast to discuss his developing theories on obesity and weight regulation. Stephan is a researcher at the University of Washington studying the neurobiology of fat regulation. He also writes one of my favorite blogs on nutrition and health, Whole Health Source.

If you have not already, I recommend you listen to my first podcast with Stephan. This show will build on material we discussed during the first interview.

Please leave your questions for Stephan about obesity, body fat regulation and weight loss in the comments section. We’ll be recording the interview on 5/13, and it will air on 5/24.

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Old 05-04-2011, 02:52 PM   #376
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Auntie Em - Thank you for your message of hope! It is especially interesting to hear other women have found reduction after long periods. I have experienced this as well; I spent most of a year at 265 somewhere around 2008.
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Old 05-04-2011, 02:59 PM   #377
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KT, thanks for your kind thoughts. The posts at that other forum inspired me to keep going, just keep going and experimenting.

I keep making small changes, ones I can live with indefinitely. If I make too large a change, I find it too easy to rebel against the imposed limit and slide out of being in charge of my choices.

I'm going to have to get a copy of Dr. Lutz's book. The google preview is quite limited. Peter Dobromylskyj has posted very good things about Dr. L.

Sending you all best thoughts for a lovely evening.
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Old 05-04-2011, 08:30 PM   #378
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Wow, I read some eye opening things tonight.

First, the Healthy Skeptic put up a post about how we tend to fine tune what we are best at, and ignore the issues that are causing problems. So, we might be worried about fine tuning a perfectly good diet while ignoring issues that are biting us like not doing anything enjoyable or not getting enough sleep.

Wow, that is so me, it is like a board in the face!

http://thehealthyskeptic.org/reflect...perfect-health


The biggest obstacle to perfect health is your mind
March 31, 2011 in Perfect Health

Recently, someone asked me which step (of the 9 I’ve just written about) is the most important in attaining perfect health.

My first response was that, despite the title of the series, there’s no such thing as perfect health. One of the few things we can be certain of in this life is that we are all dying from the moment we’re born. If such a thing as perfect health existed, and we could attain it, we’d be immortal. (And based on resource limits and the destruction humanity has wrought on this planet, immortality would be an absolute disaster – but that’s another story.)

However, we can take steps toward perfect health, and that’s why I wrote the series. Among those steps, it’s impossible to say which is most important because the answer will vary from person to person. Most of us want black and white answers to questions like this, because they provide the illusion of safety and certainty. We want the answer to be the same for everyone, because it’s easier to follow a system or a prescription than it is to find our own way. And as tribal animals, we humans like to be part of a group. Hence the power of social movements, whether we’re talking about the Paleo/Primal lifestyle or the popularity of Justin Bieber.

So, while I can’t tell you what the most important of the 9 Steps is for you, I can tell you what the biggest obstacle to perfect health is for most people: their own mind.

A chain is only as strong as its weakest link

What I’ve observed in myself, in working with patients and in almost 20 years of meditation practice is that each of us has a significant blind spot or area in our lives where we lack awareness and insight. As a crude analogy, let’s call this a weak link in our chain and assume that the chain represents health.

Most of us invest the majority of our time and energy strengthening the parts of our chain that are already strong. These stronger links are where we feel comfortable and confident, where we can operate safely within the bounds of who we think we are.

And this is where the problem lies. No matter how much we strengthen the links in our chain that are already strong, if there’s still a weak link the chain as a whole isn’t stronger. It can break just as easily.

A better approach, of course, would be to focus our efforts on the strengthening the weak link. But that is much, much harder to do. Why? Because it usually requires us to step out of our concept of self and challenge our very identity. It asks us to grow and evolve and shine the light of awareness into the dark corners of our psyche. This isn’t something that happens overnight. It’s not as simple as popping a pill or eliminating nightshades from our diet. It’s a life’s work.

Meet Joe Paleo and his weak link

To make this even more clear, let’s take a hypothetical person: Joe Paleo. He was a high-school and college athlete and has been interested in nutrition and fitness his entire life. He’s on a Paleo diet, does Cross-fit and takes all the right supplements. But he’s still not as healthy as he’d like to be. He’s a little overweight, he’s tired, and he’s not sleeping well.

So he starts to tweak his diet. Is dairy the issue? Should he add white rice, or be completely grain free? How many carbs? What about intermittent fasting? He also tries some new supplements and makes adjustments to his exercise routine. But Joe still doesn’t feel better.

Why isn’t Joe getting better? Because he’s just strengthening the parts of his chain that are already strong – and ignoring the weak links. In Joe’s case, it may be that stress management or practicing pleasure are the weak links. But his first challenge in addressing them is that he’s not even fully aware that stress or a lack of pleasure are problems.

This is where our own minds become the biggest obstacle in our quest for perfect health: we often can’t see what our weakest links are, because, by definition, those are areas where we lack awareness or insight.

But even once we become aware of what our weak links are, it’s still difficult to work with them. We’re fighting against a lifetime of conditioned beliefs about who we are and what we’re supposed to do. In Joe Paleo’s case, perhaps he was raised in a family that didn’t value rest or pleasure, but placed a high premium on success and accomplishment. This makes it hard for him to carve out time to relax or have fun.

What about me?

My own weak link is pleasure/fun. I’ve got the diet dialed in. Exercise? No problem. I’m even very committed to stress management. But what often falls through the cracks for me is making time for pleasure and fun.

I know this is the weak link in my chain, because the periods of my life where I’ve emphasized it have been the periods when I’ve enjoyed the best health. But lately, as I’ve been immersed in running a busy private practice, teaching, launching products and preparing for the arrival of my first child, I haven’t made much time for pleasure or fun. And my health has suffered as a result.

My commitment to myself is to try to do one purely pleasurable or fun activity each day. Some days I’m more successful than others, and I always have to look out for the tendency to fall back into my old pattern.

If you want perfect health, focus on your weakest link
This article got a bit longer than I intended, but here’s the point: if you want to move closer to perfect health, focus on your weakest link. And if you need help identifying it, it’s the area you’re least likely to value as important and the place you feel most uncomfortable or uncertain about yourself.

Remember the 80/20 rule I wrote about earlier, where 20% of your effort will yield 80% of the results? That’s just another way of expressing what we’re talking about here. Just a little bit of attention on your weak links will produce a huge benefit. On the other hand, even relatively massive efforts to strengthen the links that are already strong won’t lead to much improvement.

So what’s your weak link? And what commitment can you make to yourself to strengthen it? Let us know in the comments section.
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Old 05-04-2011, 09:05 PM   #379
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Interesting Jimmy Moore show! He says he hasn't had a psychiatrist on before.

All around interesting show. Take a look at this show, episode #437, January 20, 2011

Low-Carb psychiatrist Dr. Ann Childers is our guest today on The Livin’ La Vida Low-Carb Show with Jimmy Moore!

Here are my some of my highlights:
  • Anxiety creates a large cortisol response that is associated with a metabolic syndrome picture.

  • On Alzheimers - "Type 3 Diabetes" - The brain is subject to the same laws as the body in most cases. It has its own way of moderating sugar. When we overload any organ with sugar, it begins to lock it out. Ketones can help these patients.

  • Ketogenic diet - calms the brain, helps those with mental illness with this effect

  • Vitamin D is a star right now, the nutrient de jour. Yes, it is a star, but don't focus on this to the exclusion of others we need. We used to have a very nutrient-rich diet. Families in the 50s used to eat liver 2x per week, vitamin A, Vitamin D, B vitamins, purines, you name it, it is in there. We used to eat snout to tail when we were closer to our agricultural roots, but now we eat only eat muscle meats, if that. People have cut red meat out of the diet. Standard multiple vitamin, it is OK insurance, but does not replace a nutrient-dense diet.


    Iron (important, but cautions iron supplementation is not recommended for everyone, need a ferriton and C-reactive protein test together to be sure it is not just an inflammation-caused ferriton level), minerals, magnesium, vitamin D levels, all these are important to check. Omega 3 - recommends 2x per week oily fish (recommends oily fish consumption over taking fish oil).




= = = = = = =



Ann Childers, MD began her career as an animal behavior researcher and over time she noticed the effects of diet on canine health and behavior. Eventually she decided to become a professional licensed child and adult psychiatrist and a strong advocate for a low-carb approach to improving one’s “mental fitness” as well as physical health. Listen in for some junk food horror stories and what kinds of mental disorders she’s treated with carbohydrate restriction!

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Old 05-04-2011, 09:19 PM   #380
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Oh, another nice butter article!

It is me marking things in bold, btw...

I took out the links; I'm not sure when links are OK and when not. THey were links to the butter brands. I still haven't seen the Organic Valley butter in the green wrapper! I'm going to have to drive out to Whole Foods next. I do have a good stock of Kerrygold, but I admit after looking at this article that I don't eat it much since I have been eating the stock broth. I'll have to drop a pat in there now.

From Ann Childer's blog (the psychiatrist on Jimmy Moore's show - see prior post)

= = = = = =


Butter Up, Buttercup!


Butter has long been a staple of diets of people who enjoy optimal health. Only within the past 60 years has it become the villain of heart disease lore. In the wake of its modern reputation, few realize that butter held a place in the heart of American meals long before heart disease became a problem.




In fact, real butter (butter oil, clarified butter or ghee for the lactose and casein intolerant), preferably from pasture-fed cows, should be served with every meal. The fats in butter make meals more satisfying, and people who eat butter routinely are less likely to overeat.


Butter is a key source of the most easily utilized form of Vitamin A, required for support of skin and organs, including endocrine glands, the immune system and the brain. We don’t think of antioxidants in butter, but in fact butter is loaded with them. Butter is a good source of vitamin E. It contains good cholesterol, the type that is not oxidized and is important for brain and organ function. It is a natural source of conjugated linoleic acids (CLA), which show promise in research for holding weight to a normal range and preventing diabetes.

Short and medium chain fatty acids in butter have anti-tumor effects that can help prevent cancer. Vitamins A and D in butter from healthy cows assist in the absorption of calcium for healthy bones and teeth. The iodine in butter is important for the health of the thyroid gland and a healthy metabolism by extension. Lipids in butter help protect the intestine from infection. The omega 3 fatty acids found in pasture butter are essential to brain and mental health. When paired with bread and other carbohydrate sources, butter slows the entry of sugar into the bloodstream, and when melted over hot vegetables, butter helps them surrender their nutrients in forms easy to digest.


Butter appears to be heart protective. Butter is one of the best foods for increasing the HDLs, or "good cholesterol" in your bloodstream. Research shows its effect on LDLs is to make them large and fluffy, a condition known as "Pattern A", so LDLs are less likely to contribute to clogged arteries.


Cows properly fed on nutrient rich green pastures are the healthiest. Butter from these cows (pasture butter) is the most nutritious of all. This vibrant gold butter derives its rich yellow color from carotenes in the greens cows eat. Osteoporosis and coronary artery disease (heart disease) are strongly associated with deficiencies of Vitamin K2, and pasture butter is chock full of this nutrient. All this from a food that tastes delicious!


These are just a few of the virtues of real butter. When it comes to butter, purchase the highest quality you can find. Pastured, cultured butter is best. Butter of this quality is harvested from Spring through Autumn, but thanks to refrigeration companies that produce it can make it available year round. Links to three sources of pasture butter can be found below:

Organic Valley Pasture Butter

Kerrygold Pure Irish Butter

PastureLand Butter


And in the words of butter-loving Julia Child, who lived until 2 days before her 92nd birthday, “Bon appetit!”

Last edited by Key Tones; 05-04-2011 at 09:23 PM..
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Old 05-04-2011, 10:33 PM   #381
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Auntie Em,

Have you seen this? His write up of the autoimmune attacks - is this what you are curious about?


Dr. med. Wolfgang Lutz: Dismantling a Myth: Chapter VII


This is almost half-way down in the article.


Low-Carbohydrate Nutrition

I can only report positive about my ulcerative colitis patients (*43-47). Alone the number of more than 200 patients is unusual for a practitioner. It indicates that one patient recommends him to another. Many patients came to me from hospitals, where these unlucky people congregate and are told "There is no diet for ulcerative colitis or Crohn's Disease. Eat whatever you can tolerate. Take your medication and come back to us when you have a relapse. Eventually you may have to be operated anyway."

Of the first 74 patients, whom I have treated until 1979 with a low-carbohydrate diet (*46), approximately 60% were without complaints after two years, had normal laboratory values, and a normal-looking rectal mucosa (figure 17, see also color plate following page 348). The remaining 40% took longer, four, six, eight years, until the bleeding stopped, iron levels normalIzed, diarrhoea and abdominal pain subsided. I had only two patients who took longer than eight years until their disease calmed down.


Dr. med. Wolfgang Lutz: Dismantling a Myth: Chapter VII
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Old 05-04-2011, 11:32 PM   #382
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KT, you've been busy. Yes, I do have that link to Dr. L in my bookmarks, and some things in German. If someone wishes to read a bit of his writings in German, here is his Kranker Magen, Kranker Darm online. I'm going to have to get Life Without Bread for myself.

Barry Groves wrote about some of Dr. Lutz's early work with people who had MS, the diet they were on and how they fared.

Someone posted a comment at Hyperlipid that Dr. L had stated that it could take middle-aged people months to adapt to an LC diet, and that people over 70 might never adapt. I wanted to find a written reference for that statement.

Organic Valley Pastured Butter is often in a health food section of the store, and not with the regular butter. Depends on how the store is set up. Some of the smaller stores do not carry it.

Thanks for all your posts helping folks find out about key aspects of good nutrition.
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Old 05-05-2011, 04:24 AM   #383
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Jamie Scott, who writes, That Paleo Guy, has a new blog post about caffeine (coffee, specifically), glucose metabolism, and insulin resistance. Worth a read.

Hope you all are having a very nice morning.
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Old 05-05-2011, 05:44 AM   #384
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Wow, so much good information. Thank-you!!

I am still doing Dr. K's diet. Went off plan for my daughter's wedding last weekend, but am back on. Wow, I have no problem getting enough fat in because I've been drinking cream w/milk and water. I should slow down with it. I have always been a milk drinker and it's like heaven!

Cathy,
I can so relate to you! I know many people who are also struggling with a stall. I need to adopt your attitude!
What gets me is people who are close to me think I should switch plans. My husband said something about using Alli. I don't want to switch plans so I just politely listen. My daughter lost weight with weight watcher's and then there's me! I told them I tried weight watcher's (I did) and it didn't work. Enough of my complaining.

Everyone have a great morning!
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Old 05-05-2011, 05:53 AM   #385
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There are some good comments at Hyperlipid on kidney stones being present before one starts a LCHF diet, and that the stones "reveal" themselves on the diet. I don't have a link handy.


Auntie Em,
Dr. K talks in his book about patient's with gallstones, who start his high fat diet, and the diet dissolves the stones. I thought that was very interesting.

Another thing that Dr. K said which was an "aha" moment was about sugar.
He wrote that it was the only substance that doesn't have any nutritional value and that it doesn't go bad because even mold and bacteria won't eat it.
That really made sense to me how "bad" sugar is for us.
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Old 05-05-2011, 05:55 AM   #386
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My first sentence was a quote from Auntie Em. (I thought it emboldened it when you quoted)
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Old 05-05-2011, 06:15 AM   #387
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Thank you Auntie Em, KT and Joannamaria for your kind words and encouragement. I am learning so much about nutrition here and elsewhere and I don't believe it is a lost cause when it comes to weight loss but I do think as Auntie Em alluded to, that I may be 'healing' and this may take time.

The thing that puzzles me is, why would one suddenly stop losing without really changing anything? The only thing that I can think is that at the time the stall began - to the very day - I was on holiday and came down with some kind of 24 hour bug that had me vomiting, feverish and on the potty. None of the other 10 family members I was traveling with, got it. I should add that apart from a few beers, I stayed exactly on plan. Probably just an odd coincidence. But then I think, maybe there is something else that got 'set off' and now I just have to wait it out? Not logical or scientific .... I am attaching my 'weight loss - or not' chart for your entertainment!!

Wow, KT, you have been busy! Thanks for the article and suggested podcast - will be listening on my walk today. Btw, I was very intrigued by the discussion about choline and am excited to be finding myself some beef liver (grass fed) for my dinner!
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Old 05-05-2011, 06:26 AM   #388
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Key Tones View Post

Ann Childers, MD began her career as an animal behavior researcher and over time she noticed the effects of diet on canine health and behavior. Eventually she decided to become a professional licensed child and adult psychiatrist and a strong advocate for a low-carb approach to improving one’s “mental fitness” as well as physical health. Listen in for some junk food horror stories and what kinds of mental disorders she’s treated with carbohydrate restriction!
This is very intriguing to me. I am sure I have mentioned this over the past year or more... one more time. I have a senior dog who was displaying symptoms of 'doggie dementia' - nighttime panting, pacing, whining and confusion. It was getting so bad that I was considering euthanasia - I was getting no sleep and it was clear she was suffering.

Long story short, many months of different drugs with only very short term success, I started changing her diet from doggie kibble to whole food. This combined with a bit of behaviour 'therapy' she is totally drug free, sleeping soundly all night long consistently and has her 'bounce' back. Truly, amazing to witness! And now when I think about it; why would a dog fare any better on a fully fake food any better than a human? I kinda go, duhhh?!

Both my dogs are really enjoying their meals these days and it is such a pleasure to witness!
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Old 05-05-2011, 06:27 AM   #389
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Interesting, what do you feed them?
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Old 05-05-2011, 06:28 AM   #390
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I have a senior dog also, a pug, but when we give him table scraps he throws up.
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