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Old 04-23-2011, 06:30 AM   #271
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Joannamaria - sure, ask away. I don't know if I will remember what I thought. He is vague and my feeling is that as long as the basics of the plan are followed, variations do not matter.

I am working this weekend as well. It is crunch time this week through the end of the month.
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Old 04-23-2011, 06:38 AM   #272
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Originally Posted by piratejenny View Post
the thing is--I'M NOT HUNGRY!!! for the first time in years, if not decades!!!

i really wish this WOE would work out for me--not just because i can have my favorite foods like mayonnaise, cream & pâté, but because i'm eating smaller amounts & feeling full longer.

i feel like i can't talk to anybody IRL about this WOE because they won't they just think I'm the biggest idiot, already almost 300lbs and trying to lose weight/get healthy without completely cutting out mayonnaise, cream & pâté?!!!

i did have some Chinese food yesterday (scallops&broccoli) and also tried pancetta for the first time and OMG was it horribly salty...i'm just sayin', even if this is my alarmingly-bloated-retaining-water-weight, it's at least 3-4lbs above my last alarmingly-bloated-retaining-water weight...which just seems to go up every month lately.

it's like the opposite of a whoosh.

thank you, Julie, for the hug!

PS--Has anyone on this thread (I know there are other threads about it) tried the Rosedale diet?
It seems like a similar plan, at least calorie distribution-wise (high fat, moderate protein, low carb), but eliminates a lot of the animal fat allowed on this plan.
It doesn't look exciting to me...goes against some of what I have been reading...but it supposedly addresses leptin resistance.
Not being hungry is the most amazing thing for me. Intrusive thoughts of food are gone. It has been a year and a half for me (most recently) and I forget already how miserable I used to be until someone mentions it! If I never lost another lb. I would continue low carb just for those 2 things.

I had not heard of the Rosedale diet but did a little search on it (lots of info) and it seems reasonable to me. Leptin seems to be the focus which is a bit different. I wonder why we couldn't have leptin supplements? I also wondered if leptin is part of a standard blood panel. I am visiting my doc next month and have quite a list of questions for him. Sure hope he has been keeping up with the current literature on obesity!
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Old 04-23-2011, 07:50 AM   #273
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So sorry, I have forgotten to reply on the Rosedale Diet/leptin.

The discovery about leptin was very exciting initially because obese mice responded to leptin. Unfortunately, obese people were found to be producing a lot of leptin! Yep, the fat cells scream leptin, the hypothalmus does not respond. It is thought this could be due to inflammation. THe drug companies were so sad to discover this, they were so ready to make money on leptin, of course.

Clackley - IF is supposed to help with leptin resistance, and the leptin diets are low carb, so you are probably already addressing this. However, I have not read about leptin for a couple of years so I may be forgetting something.
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Old 04-23-2011, 08:04 AM   #274
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Auntie Em - Thank you again for your posts and replies! It is so nice to have you looking in and helping us.

I do eat wild-caught salmon on occasion, and anchovies from the asian market (just a few pinches). My daughter loves salmon and will eat a large portion if she can. I am worried for this because of the mercury in the larger fish, so not to often, of course, I think everyone has heard this on mercury. Wild is better of course! I won't eat farmed salmon at all.

OK, I finally found an easy-to-digest article on grass-fed butter. This is one way I address my questionable chicken-eating ways. I'm not sure the link to Mark's Daily Apple will go through, so I will just post the article.

= = = =

IS ALL BUTTER CREATED EQUAL?

The embrace (some might say exaltation) of butter is, in some respects, what sets the Primal eating plan apart from strict paleo. It is essentially pure animal fat with only minor traces of dairy proteins and sugars remaining, and for that reason I consider it a worthwhile staple. But, to answer the question posed in the title, not all butter is created equal. Most of us are in agreement that the nutritional content of the animal’s flesh depends on the content of its diet, and the same goes for butter.

We’ve covered similar ground with other foods – olive oil, cheese, chocolate, to name a few – but butter’s special. A quick glance around the forum and other online paleo/Primal/real food communities reveals that people are mad for butter. Perhaps it’s because we’re subject to a steady barrage of anti-butter propaganda from day one on this earth; perhaps it’s due to the fact that the stuff tastes like heaven and goes with nearly everything. Whatever the reason, butter knowledge is important.


Grass-Fed vs. Grain-Fed

The eternal battle rages on. While the grass-fed camp may be outnumbered, they are plucky, pugnacious fighters with superior armament, training, and tactics. Once they finish off grain-fed butter in Spartans-at-Thermopylae fashion, I expect them to make short work of margarine. Here’s why it’s so lopsided:

Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA) ContentCLA is a funny fatty acid. It’s actually a trans-fat, but it’s a good, naturally occurring one. Instead of a group of candle wax makers creating trans-fats in industrial vats by hydrogenating cottonseed oil into disgusting, technically edible faux-butter, the special digestive systems of grass-fed ruminants produce CLA internally. The resulting trans-fat – which has been linked to superior heart health, suppression of tumors, reduced belly fat (although in pigs, I’m not sure that’s what we’re after!), and greater fat loss in the obese and overweight – pops up in the flesh and dairy of the animal. As far as cows go, pasture feeding leads to dairy CLA levels 3-5 times that of grain-fed cattle (PDF).

Winner: Grass-fed Butter

Vitamin ContentWe’re drawn to colorful things, especially foods. Bright berries, verdant greens, multicolored fruits and peppers – these are the naturally occurring foods with the most phytonutrients. In fact, the actual dyes responsible for providing color to vegetation, like the blue in blueberry, are also usually antioxidants. Funny how that works out, eh? The same is true for butter. You ever notice how grass-fed butter actually looks like butter? It’s a deep yellow, sometimes bordering on orange, whereas grain-fed butter is white and waxy. It’s yellow because it has more carotene (think carrot, think orange) and Vitamin A. It’s got more carotene because it comes from cows that eat fresh vegetation rich in the stuff. From pasture to ruminant to digestive tract to butterfat to butter to you. Grain-fed? From the study I just linked, even back in 1933 they understood that “the oil cakes and cereals in common use are incapable of bringing about this result” of yellow, vitamin-rich butter.

Vitamin K2, in case you weren’t aware, appears to reduce, prevent, or even counteract arterial plaque, and it helps the body use calcium correctly and effectively. Vitamin K2 is another vital component of grass-fed butter. As Dr. Weston Price observed, only cows subsisting on fresh green grass produced butter imbued with significant levels of the all-important “Activator X,” which most people agree is vitamin K2. Cow stomach fermentation turns K1 (found in leafy greens, like kale, chard, spinach, and, yes, leaves of grass) into K2, which then shows up in the dairy fat. How much Vitamin K1 do you think there is in corn? Not much at all (PDF).

Winner: Grass-fed Butter

Fatty Acid CompositionWhether it’s grass-fed or grain-fed, butter is rich in saturated (about 2/3) and monounsaturated (just under 1/3) fat. The rest is polyunsaturated, but this is where grass-fed and grain-fed really differ. Cows raised on pasture produce milk fat with an omega 6 to omega 3 ratio of 1. Yes, equal amounts. A balance. Grain-fed cows, on the other hand, produce a ratio tilted heavily toward omega 6. It’s true that we’re talking about relatively miniscule amounts of polyunsaturated fats here, but I prefer the balanced ratio. And if you’re putting away as much butter as I can, those insignificant amounts of omega 6 can begin to add up.

Winner: Grass-fed Butter

FlavorFlavor is usually a subjective determination. What tastes better is entirely a matter of personal opinion, right? Not in the case of butter. Grass-fed butter tastes objectively better using any parameter. Creaminess? Smooth, yellow grass-fed butter can be eaten and enjoyed like candy. Richness? Grain-fed is weak and insipid in comparison. Mouth feel? Grass-fed coats the interior (in a pleasant way), while grain-fed comes off as watery and unnatural.

Winner: Grass-fed Butter

All that said, grain-fed butter is still a better option than conventional cooking fats, like vegetable oil or margarine. I still request restaurant food to be cooked in butter, completely aware that it’s probably white as a ghost and totally grain-fed. The saturated fat in regular butter isn’t any less stable.

Grass-fed isn’t as tough to find as you might think, though. And even if it’s more expensive, it’s still cheaper than shelling out the dough for exclusively grass-fed meat. In fact, for those of you who can’t regularly eat pastured meat, eating lean cuts of conventional meat cooked in a quality grass-fed butter is a great compromise.

Watch out for these brands near you:A favorite, fairly easy-to-find brand is Kerrygold, an Irish dairy whose cows are all pastured and whose butter is incredible. I get mine for $2.69 at Trader Joe’s, but I’ve seen it in basic and specialty grocery stores, too (albeit for slightly higher prices). Look for the silver foil (unsalted) and gold foil (salted) packages.

Anchor butter is another tasty one. It hails from New Zealand, land of reliably grass-fed lamb, and I’ve seen it at Whole Foods for a reasonable price. If you can’t find it there, you could always order online in bulk. Just freeze the extras.

Organic Valley has a seasonal pastured, cultured, salted butter that usually appears in spring, which is when the grass is at its greenest. I’ve had it a few times. It’s good and a bit tangy, and it comes in a green foil package. Skip the regular Organic Valley stuff, which gets some grain.

Check farmers’ markets. If you’ve got a dairy stall, you’ve probably got access to good butter. Talk to the producers about the cows’ diet.

Terminology

Learn the slang that’ll help you blend in with the cool kids at the next Weston A. Price Foundation meet-up.

What is cultured butter?Cultured butter is traditionally made from fermented, or soured, cream. It’s not actually the butterfat that ferments, but rather the trace amounts of lactose sugars present. Nowadays, though, most commercial cultured butter is “cultured” by the incorporation of bacterial cultures. “European style” butter is cultured butter.

What is “sweet butter”?Historically, sweet cream butter came from fresh cream, rather than soured or fermented cream. Relative to cultured butter, it’s rather “sweet.” These days, it’s often just another way to describe unsalted butter. Sweet butter is better for cooking, as most recipes assume the use of unsalted butter. Also, since salt is a preservative, sweet butter tends to be fresher (since it has to be, having no preservatives).

What is clarified butter?Heat butter until it melts, let it cool and settle, then skim off the top layer of whey protein and pour off the butterfat, leaving the casein proteins on the bottom – you’ve got clarified butter.

What about ghee?Ghee is basically pure butterfat, rendered down and stricken of all lactose and dairy proteins. It’s ultra-clarified butter in that it reaches a temperature high enough to cook off the water and brown the milk solids, which imparts a nutty flavor to the finished product. Properly made, ghee can stay on the counter for about a year without going bad. If you’ve got one, check your local Indian grocer. They’ll have huge tubs of intensely yellow ghee for sale. Is it all grass-fed? I’ve no idea, and the rich color isn’t a reliable indicator since the color could come from the browned milk solids. Anyone know for sure?

There are clear winners and losers in life. Grass-fed butter wins handily and grain-fed loses. There’s not much more to say other than get out there and find yourself a decent source of grass-fed butter!

Last edited by Key Tones; 04-23-2011 at 08:05 AM..
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Old 04-23-2011, 12:16 PM   #275
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Whew...I'm down 3lbs this morning. Still 2lbs above what I was all week, and 3-4lbs above my "low" weight of 292.6-291.6 of the last few weeks. However, whenever I have an unusual weight fluctuation, I also check my waist measurement; it's somewhat of a comfort that it's usually the same even when temporarily I go up a few pounds.

Ghee:
I make this all the time, and that's pretty much all we use. I have a special, pretty blue enameled pot I strain it into, and keep it by the stove. It's very fragrant and has a nutty, almost caramelized flavor; it makes EVERYTHING taste better!

It is higher in fat, like oil, because all of the water has evaporated (butter is 11-12g fat per Tbsp, oil/ghee is 14g). It also has a higher smoke point than butter, and the food you cook in it browns/crisps nicely.

I use 2lbs sweet butter per batch. It foams up a bit at the beginning, but I discovered (by accidentally taking a nap during a batch!) that it settles to the bottom if you don't skim it off. Then it starts to brown...you can brown to taste--I like mine quite browned. I have accidentally even burned the solids at the bottom, and, after straining, the ghee still tasted good.

A couple of times that I have used salted butter, the process seems to make all the salt sink to the bottom & it gets strained out. The resulting ghee is not salty at all--but the foam has a more sour, unpleasant taste. This confirms for me that unsalted butter is made with higher-quality cream.

Once I used home-made butter (from HWC) to make ghee and oh my goodness was it delicious! It ended up being quite a bit more expensive than just buying butter, though!

I've made ghee dozens of times, and never gotten the rich yellow color I see in commercially made ghee (I shop at an Indian market frequently). I have wondered if perhaps there is a little turmeric added for color. But there are "vegetable" ghees (margarine! yuck!) as opposed to "cow ghee". I haven't inspected too closely, as I like to make my own.
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Old 04-23-2011, 12:41 PM   #276
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What a timely article KT. I was discussing this with sister just the other day. She wanted to know what made 'organic' dairy better and I couldn't remember. I sent her the article and went out and found some organic butter.

I think one thing to keep in mind is that the terminology may vary depending where you live. The rules for organics and what the constitutes, may vary widely.
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Old 04-23-2011, 12:51 PM   #277
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What a timely article KT. I was discussing this with sister just the other day. She wanted to know what made 'organic' dairy better and I couldn't remember. I sent her the article and went out and found some organic butter.

I think one thing to keep in mind is that the terminology may vary depending where you live. The rules for organics and what the constitutes, may vary widely.
I have to say, I don't know what organic butter really means. I have seen the Organic Valley brand before, but not the green foil type Mark is referring to. I would love to try it!

I buy the Kerrygold brand from Trader Joe's, it is delicious! I stock up on it!

Piratejenny - I've never tried or made ghee; I may try it sometime.

It can take a few days to off-load the salt.
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Old 04-23-2011, 05:13 PM   #278
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KT, thanks for your kind thoughts.

I like the taste of Organic Valley pastured butter. It is my first choice.
When the store is out of it, I get the Kerrygold. But the Organic Valley pastured tastes good enough to eat with a spoon!

I put butter in my tea, with a teensy bit of cream.

If folks have access to local farmers and can get raw, pastured cream to make butter, or raw, pastured butter, that would be a real treat. Fresh, pastured cream, IMO, is the most scrumptious thing to eat.

I finally found a place to get veal brains and have been enjoying eating those scrambled in pastured butter with black pepper. The last serving from a package is usually a bit small, so those get mixed with egg yolks, cooked in pastured butter, and with a dash of black pepper. The idea of them still sounds strange but they are delicious. I don't soak them first or anything. Just open the package and cook, chopping them up while they cook. Easy and ever so much milder than liver. The packages are about 8.5 ounces and I get three meals from them. (That last meal with egg yolks.) I find them very satiating. They instantly became a favorite.

Hope you all have some scrumptious things on the menu this week-end.

Happy Easter smiles and best wishes to all for a lovely Sunday. :wave:
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Old 04-24-2011, 03:45 PM   #279
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More on avocados

All -

Happy Easter to you all!

I mean no disrespect by posting on Easter. It is my first day off and the only day I have had to do more reading and put more thought into the diet.

As you know, I have been very concerned about slow weight loss and what could be blocking weight loss. In my readings on Peat and that path that has taken, I have noted that I seem to show the signs of estrogen dominance. Given my horrible PMS symptoms and my age (46 - in other words, potentially the beginnings of menopause symptoms could be showing up) and my incredibly slow weight loss, I am concerned. Apparently, the progesterone cream is helpful for blocking the unwanted effects of estrogen. I understand high estrogen can be a concern for men as well, but I have not read up on that issue.

In purusing the matter on the internet, it seems women with recurring breast cancer are keen on the issue of food choices that could be detrimental and promote estrogen in the body. I don't wish to post heresay from blogs about it, so, I am posting info that seems consistent from dot org sites. This is not meant to be a cancer-scare kind of a post, I just found this to seem credible from reducing estrogen dominance from a dietary standpoint.

Again, I am not looking to go on a wild goosechase on the diet. I will apply what I have read to my skeleton of following Kwasniewski within my dietary constraints of food sensitivities and generally following a low-carbohydrate diet.

So, what does this have to do with avocados?

Of particular interest is that avocados not only serve as an estrogen blocker, it also is high in antioxidants. What set me off on this search is Peats talking about eating carrots to block estrogen. I don't like carrots much. I thought, surely there must be other (low-carb please!) foods that could do the job.


Foods to Balance Hormones
Estrogen Blocking Foods

There are even foods that actually help to block estrogen. Certain foods like nuts, olives, avocados and a variety of seeds aid your body in producing progesterone, which of course helps cancel out and block estrogen. Studies have shown that women can increase their weight loss by at least two times by simply adding an ounce of seeds or nuts to their diet each day. For women who do not enjoy the taste of nuts or seeds, 1 tablespoon of olive oil will do the trick. There are some foods you must avoid at all costs if you are attempting to block estrogen from your body. Among these foods are bacon, sausage, licorice, beer and soy.
Also mentioned was to eat organic meat to avoid hormones. I need to take this to heart

I disagree with the "estrogen flushing" recommendations, because these are unfriendly to the thyroid! Also, I am I leary of seeds and nuts due to digestive upsets and food sensitivities. Phytates.

I will admit I am flipping through Kharriazian's book out of curiousity. I am bowled over by the number of supplements in the book. Ugh. I will take these with a grain of salt and look for foods that target what he is seeking to achieve. So, of note, this is good news for avocados. He recommends using glutathione/superoxide dismutase cream to reduce inflammation and oxidative stress. I am mulling this over, as I really do believe there is some autoimmune thing going on with me that is creating inflammation and possibly at the root of insulin resistance, leptin resistance, and maybe my thyroid is at risk. This hashimotos business is freaking me out; apparently, people with autoimmune issues get hashimotos when the body turns on the thyroid. Ugh.

Anyway, I am leary of creams and supplements, so check this out. Heh, the avocado is rich in glutathione (the antioxidant Kharrazian spoke of):


Cancer Fighting Foods and Spices
Avocados are rich in glutathione, a powerful antioxidant that attacks free radicals in the body by blocking intestinal absorption of certain fats. They also supply even more potassium than bananas and are a strong source of beta-carotene. Scientists also believe that avocados may also be useful in treating viral hepatitis (a cause of liver cancer), as well as other sources of liver damage.
I wish the vegan sites weren't so unfriendly with nasty comments about meat diets. They post such beautiful things about avocados. But I won't link them here. This reallly is a superfood.

I don't mean to downplay other things I have read. Apparently, berries are good for knocking down your estrogen levels, too.

I wish I could find a low-carb food list that is pro-thyroid and anti-estrogen. This is going to involve some legwork.

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Old 04-24-2011, 04:29 PM   #280
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Auntie Em - I can't wait for the PCC Natural Markets coupon. I'm going to go look for the pastured Organic Valley butter. Wow, I am curious about brains now; liver I just can't stomach. Kwasniewski spoke of eating something like brain cheese; I didn't know what it was.

Jem51 - I am freaked out thinking about autoimmune issues that likely would be cured with a purist paleo approach. How are you doing/feeling? I'm really curious!
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Old 04-24-2011, 04:42 PM   #281
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My grandfather lived to be 105 and he was very with it up until the end. I could go on and on about this remarkable man but I was thinking about him and the fact that he loved head cheese and ate it most days. This is basically jellied beef brains. Hmmmmm
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Old 04-24-2011, 05:25 PM   #282
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Clackley - that reminds me - did you notice the recommendation to take olive oil for weight loss I posted below from healthguidance.org (the post from today on avocados)? I wonder if the shangrila diet obtained the idea as an estrogen blocker!

I love it when mysteries start to unravel...

I'm not too keen on giving up bacon or sausage, though, not sure I"m going there, but I do admit my sausage is actually Applegate Farms chicken sausage.

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Old 04-24-2011, 09:25 PM   #283
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Clackley - I was posting too quickly, on my way out the door.

So interesting on the jelly beef brains fountain of youth story! Grandfather knew what he was doing, and so does Auntie Em.

Heh -head cheese - yes, that's what I meant.

The only brains I am getting are the little pea-brained anchovies since I have the tiny fish jerky types with the heads attached. Oh, and I had mussels tonight. Not sure if these things have brains, actually. Hmph.

I am the biggest wimp of a Kwasniewski dieter! I do dream, though!

I am so certain that weight loss is hormonal. I really, truly believe this. I think insulin is a big part of the story, but there are other hormones at play. My gosh, it's so complex.

Sometimes, I feel bewitched.

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Old 04-25-2011, 11:59 AM   #284
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KT- all that butter talk OK I have the Kerrygold I think its expensive so I only use it on something really tasty, LOL I have ghee, I cook with that, got it at the healthfood store, clarified butter is good, a different taste, I really like it with seafood!

You have been a busy girl, so much to process here!

hope everyone had a nice holiday!
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Old 04-25-2011, 12:01 PM   #285
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Clackley - I was posting too quickly, on my way out the door.

So interesting on the jelly beef brains fountain of youth story! Grandfather knew what he was doing, and so does Auntie Em.

Heh -head cheese - yes, that's what I meant.

The only brains I am getting are the little pea-brained anchovies since I have the tiny fish jerky types with the heads attached. Oh, and I had mussels tonight. Not sure if these things have brains, actually. Hmph.

I am the biggest wimp of a Kwasniewski dieter! I do dream, though!

I am so certain that weight loss is hormonal. I really, truly believe this. I think insulin is a big part of the story, but there are other hormones at play. My gosh, it's so complex.

Sometimes, I feel bewitched.
I hear you! I have 'no brains' on my menu too.
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Old 04-26-2011, 09:14 AM   #286
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Peter at Hyperlipid

I know some of you read his posts. New one from Monday.

Hyperlipid: Diabetic nephropathy and the lost Swede

His humor kills me:
A far more plausible explanation is that ketosis induces dissatisfaction in these mice concerning their body image due to their obese state so they then started to cut calories and go to the gym every night. Duh.
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Old 04-26-2011, 12:38 PM   #287
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Heads Up - Looks like an Interesting One.

All - I like to talk about problems, not hide from them. Chris Kresser is low-carb friendly. I am very curious about his topics.

The Healthy Skeptic Podcast – Episode 8

Apr 26, 2011 08:08 am | Chris Kresser

Bring on the Paleo-Nerd-A-Thon! In this week’s episode paleo nerds Robb Wolf and Mat LaLonde (a.k.a. “The Kraken”) join me to discuss some of the finer points of the paleo/primal approach to nutrition. We answer cover the following topics:

Why weight loss often plateaus or even reverses on low- or zero-carb diets, and why increasing carbohydrate intake can often jump-start weight loss again
Whether ketones or glucose are a better source of fuel in particular circumstances
  1. Whether it’s important to eat glycine-rich foods like bone broths as well as methionine rich foods like muscle meats and eggs – and what the consequences may be of too little glycine and too much methionine
  2. How to increase testosterone and libido without testosterone creams
  3. Whether elevated LDL after adopting a paleo diet is caused by micronutrient deficiencies
  4. The complete lack of evidence supporting “metabolic typing”
  5. The potential causes of excessive bloating
  6. The myth that a paleo diet is bad for the kidneys
  7. What a paleo diet can – and can’t – do for type 2 diabetes
  8. Since we’re all nerds that like to talk, the episode is longer than usual – 90 minutes. But we had a great time and we’re thinking of making it a quarterly event. Let us know what you think!
P.S. You’ll notice the theme song is different this week. We pulled it from Release the Kraken.
The_Healthy_Skeptic_Podcast_Episode_8.mp3 129.9 MB
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Old 04-27-2011, 06:24 AM   #288
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Hi!

Been really busy with Easter, family and work.

I got my book and have been reading it. It makes very much sense to me. I actually tried one of his recipes the cheese pancakes. I substituted cream cheese for the cheese he says and they turned out very well. I used almond flour instead of regular flour. My 12-year-old son ate them right up. I am thrilled because he is so picky and only wants carbs to eat.

I am confused about how many carbs we are supposed to have. Because in one place he says 50 carbs and 50 grams of protein; but then he mentions his ratio of 1 Protein: 2-5 - 3-5 Fat - .5 Carbs. But if you have only 50 grams of protein, half of that is 25 grams of carbs. Maybe I'm reading it wrong?!?

KT,
Thanks for the info as always! I have to go out of town to babysit grandkids but when I get back I'd like to listen to Chris Kresser's podcast.
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Old 04-27-2011, 10:23 AM   #289
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Originally Posted by Key Tones View Post
Heads Up - Looks like an Interesting One.

All - I like to talk about problems, not hide from them. Chris Kresser is low-carb friendly. I am very curious about his topics.

The Healthy Skeptic Podcast – Episode 8

Apr 26, 2011 08:08 am | Chris Kresser

Bring on the Paleo-Nerd-A-Thon! In this week’s episode paleo nerds Robb Wolf and Mat LaLonde (a.k.a. “The Kraken”) join me to discuss some of the finer points of the paleo/primal approach to nutrition. We answer cover the following topics:

Why weight loss often plateaus or even reverses on low- or zero-carb diets, and why increasing carbohydrate intake can often jump-start weight loss again
Whether ketones or glucose are a better source of fuel in particular circumstances
  1. Whether it’s important to eat glycine-rich foods like bone broths as well as methionine rich foods like muscle meats and eggs – and what the consequences may be of too little glycine and too much methionine
  2. How to increase testosterone and libido without testosterone creams
  3. Whether elevated LDL after adopting a paleo diet is caused by micronutrient deficiencies
  4. The complete lack of evidence supporting “metabolic typing”
  5. The potential causes of excessive bloating
  6. The myth that a paleo diet is bad for the kidneys
  7. What a paleo diet can – and can’t – do for type 2 diabetes
  8. Since we’re all nerds that like to talk, the episode is longer than usual – 90 minutes. But we had a great time and we’re thinking of making it a quarterly event. Let us know what you think!
P.S. You’ll notice the theme song is different this week. We pulled it from Release the Kraken.
The_Healthy_Skeptic_Podcast_Episode_8.mp3 129.9 MB
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KT, thanks for the info. I am about 1/2 way through this podcast and am very intrigued. Anyone else listening or listened?
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Old 04-27-2011, 10:34 AM   #290
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Hi Clackey,
I was just looking for it!
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Old 04-27-2011, 11:09 AM   #291
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With the 50g carb--is that net or altogether, including fiber?

Sorry if that's a dumb question---I haven't gotten his book yet.
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Old 04-27-2011, 11:20 AM   #292
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Hi Piratejenny,

That's what I was wondering. But then when I look at the menu's he has listed to follow, protein for one whole day was 70-100. I think I remember KT saying that he wants you to have "prime" protein like brains, organs etc. and if you do eat that maybe you only need 50 grams.

I can't eat that stuff. I am going to try some liver, and I have liverwurst and I like that, but I can't eat pork knuckles etc. I guess "Never say never"! But in the book he says to go down and buy a pork leg and gives a recipe for pork trotters!!
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Old 04-27-2011, 11:22 AM   #293
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oops sorry Piratejenny I didn't read your post correctly.

I thought you asked about protein. Yes in his book he says 50 grams of carbs, so you don't put the body in ketosis. His reasoning is to not make the body work harder then it has too.
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Old 04-27-2011, 11:23 AM   #294
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He does say that if you are having trouble losing weight, save the carb for the evening meal, and eat it without fat. That's hard. I have been eating pottoes, but I like butter and sour cream on them!
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Old 04-27-2011, 11:25 AM   #295
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Joannamaria - I have no clue what he means by the ratios! So I am going with the narrative.

It reminds me of that time I read the ketogenic diet for epileptic children. Everything had to be measured with a gram scale! This left me wondering, OK, meats have protein and fat, cream is fat but has water content and other elements...

...so is he saying that the heavier weight for protein accounts for this...no clue. Food can be measured in weight, volume, percentage of calories, ugh. I don't know, so I just go by the narrative.

If you notice, he says to make the recipes and eat until satisfied (and talkes about the appetite reducing over time on the high fat diet), so really, he is not hard core about following the guidelines.

PirateJenny - no clue on net carbs. I don't remember seeing anything about that. I just look at the total carbs of potatoes - it's basically two average potatoes. I only eat one, though, since I am getting carbs in my lemon juice and I have potatoes in the soup.

Jem51 - if you're reading, help!

Clackley - that show is so great isn't it? I'm glad you are enjoying the podcast. I friended the Healthy Skeptic on facebook, so I will receive notices of his upcoming shows. I need to back and listen to the old ones.
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Old 04-27-2011, 11:30 AM   #296
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KT
Thanks for your input! Do you eat your potatoes plain?

Gosh I still didn't read Piratejenny's post correct, sorry!
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Old 04-27-2011, 11:38 AM   #297
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KT
Thanks for your input! Do you eat your potatoes plain?

Gosh I still didn't read Piratejenny's post correct, sorry!
Heh, I either put a little Kerrygold butter or pour a little cream in them!

Really, I love them in the soup the best. Tempering an egg in the soup rocks, too, I think that was Jem51's suggestion. Yep, I'm adding eggs this week!

I could live on the soup!
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Old 04-27-2011, 11:49 AM   #298
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KT, (I hope you don't appreviations?!?)

Do you use the bone broth as a base for your soups? Would you mind telling me the recipe for bone broth you use? I don't have access to a butcher shop, just the meat department in Hy-Vee. (grocery chain here in midwest)

I think I read you use chicken legs?

I did start a bone broth with left-over turkey from Easter but my husband put the big pan outside, he said it was cold enough. It then got to 60 so I had to throw it all away. It did have a bunch of that gel!!

How long did you you cook it? I have gotten Fawn's recipe but I don't know about cooking it for 24 hours.
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Old 04-27-2011, 11:59 AM   #299
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KT, (I hope you don't appreviations?!?)

Do you use the bone broth as a base for your soups? Would you mind telling me the recipe for bone broth you use? I don't have access to a butcher shop, just the meat department in Hy-Vee. (grocery chain here in midwest)

I think I read you use chicken legs?

I did start a bone broth with left-over turkey from Easter but my husband put the big pan outside, he said it was cold enough. It then got to 60 so I had to throw it all away. It did have a bunch of that gel!!

How long did you you cook it? I have gotten Fawn's recipe but I don't know about cooking it for 24 hours.
Yes, I use chicken legs!!!

Hard core paleos are not into chicken, esp. dark meat (some won't eat fish either, actually). Well, you *can* skim the fat off the top of the soup, and I do that, so, I think it is perfectly cool. And delicious. I get my saturated fat from the Kerrygold butter, the coconut milk/oil, and other meats.

I simmer the chicken drumsticks for 2 hours with 2 tablespoons of apple cider vinegar. During the third and last hour, I mince just enough vegs for flavor (handful of onion from the freezer--I know, not the best, but they don't rot this way, I don't like onions much but good in soup). There are always fresh carrots around, I take a handful of those, and mince in the cuisinart. Then, I peel some organic potatoes (organic is worth it for potatoes), 2 or 3 usually, and put them through the cuisinart slicer. And toss them in the soup.

I find I actually like it without bullion cubes!

Don't forget to save the bones (heh, those are the "bodies" in my freezer). Simmer those with more apple cider vinegar for more stock!!! (I've done it for 6 hours, some do this for 24 hours - I might get the crock pot out for this next time.). Use this broth to heat up and stir in some egg (yum!!!). Or whatever you like.

Last edited by Key Tones; 04-27-2011 at 12:01 PM..
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Old 04-27-2011, 12:03 PM   #300
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Ok Thanks! that sounds doable! I will pick up chicken legs.

Oh so you use the chicken legs for the soup and then you re-use the bones for more!! Wow good idea!
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