Low Carb Friends

Low Carb Friends (http://www.lowcarbfriends.com/bbs/)
-   Nutritional Ketosis / High Fat, Low Carb (http://www.lowcarbfriends.com/bbs/nutritional-ketosis-high-fat-low-carb/)
-   -   Great little talk by Dr. Jeff Volek (http://www.lowcarbfriends.com/bbs/nutritional-ketosis-high-fat-low-carb/818472-great-little-talk-dr-jeff-volek.html)

clackley 12-10-2013 06:28 AM

Great little talk by Dr. Jeff Volek
 
Someone posted this info on another thread and I now can't find it so it may have not complied with the rules. I wanted to say that it was really a great talk on n.k. and answered some of the questions that float around here. Thank you for posting it.

For anyone who is interested, it is about 59 mins. long and it's published date is Dec. 3 2013. Entitled 'the many faucets of keto adaption' by Dr. Jeff Volek. If you do watch it, please share your thoughts?

Green 12-10-2013 08:01 AM

I just watched it and thought it was great. It makes me all the more confident in this WOE. Interesting at the end when he says he thinks one may get the same if not better results from NK as calorie restriction. I'd like to see some studies performed on that idea.

clackley 12-10-2013 08:35 AM

There are studies. He mentions one in the beginning of his talk called the A to Z comparative diet study. Done at Stanford I think.

Ntombi 12-10-2013 08:48 AM

Thanks!

Yes, there have been studies on that already. Always room for more, of course, but the study results were pretty clear, even though the LC diet was a bastardized version. Dr. Phinney has talked about the studies before as well.

Green 12-10-2013 09:20 AM

Sorry I wasn't clear. I was taking about calorie restriction in regards to life extension and whether or not NK would have similar effects. Volek thinks it would be the same if not better. The question is addressed by him at 55:33.

Ntombi 12-10-2013 11:04 AM

Ah. That would be interesting.

unna 12-10-2013 11:12 AM

I think I saw this... Is this the talk where he says that the blood can only hold 2 teaspoons of sugar at one time??

That fact totally blew my mind and made me rethink sugar completely.

Green 12-10-2013 11:13 AM

Yeah he said that. Totally mind blowing, indeed

clackley 12-10-2013 12:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Green (Post 16713017)
Sorry I wasn't clear. I was taking about calorie restriction in regards to life extension and whether or not NK would have similar effects. Volek thinks it would be the same if not better. The question is addressed by him at 55:33.

Yes, I have wondered that myself and it would be great to have some science to demonstrate that question. It seems like it would likely have similar effects as the mechanism of ketosis would be common in both senerios.

clackley 12-10-2013 12:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by unna (Post 16713180)
I think I saw this... Is this the talk where he says that the blood can only hold 2 teaspoons of sugar at one time??

That fact totally blew my mind and made me rethink sugar completely.

Not 100% sure when this talk is from but the published date on YouTube is Dec. 3 2013.

Punkin 12-11-2013 06:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by unna (Post 16713180)
I think I saw this... Is this the talk where he says that the blood can only hold 2 teaspoons of sugar at one time??

That fact totally blew my mind and made me rethink sugar completely.

Yes, I found this too. Which is about 8 carbs. I can handle more carbs at a meal, but it has to come from veggies or dairy. It probably has something to do with the blocking agents in these foods: fibre, fat and protein. Or maybe the more complex carbs take much longer to hit the bloodstream which has less of an impact on the blood sugar. Regardless, we shouldn't be eating sugar straight up. It should come more naturally, in the whole food form. Basically I think it just means we shouldn't be eating processed or refined foods at all :)

unna 12-11-2013 11:04 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Punkin (Post 16714083)
Regardless, we shouldn't be eating sugar straight up. It should come more naturally, in the whole food form. Basically I think it just means we shouldn't be eating processed or refined foods at all :)

I agree, except I think for many fruit is quite hazardous to our health, despite the fact that it is natural. I ate some blueberries for breakfast the other day (with fat and protein) and I started to feel tired / fatigued.

Again, I don't think this applies to everyone. Many people can eat fruit and feel amazing.

Although, I was just watching another documentary on an African hunter-gatherer tribe. They never had anything sweet to eat except for when they happened upon the occasional beehive in a tree (which was dangerous and painful to remove). For some reason, they didn't seem to have ready access to fruit trees/berries like we imagine.

CuriousCat 12-11-2013 11:37 AM

Thanks for the information. It's very interesting.

Mistizoom 12-12-2013 06:39 AM

Thanks, I'll look for this on YouTube.

DiamondDeb 12-12-2013 07:36 PM

Cathy, thanks for mentioning this talk. I really enjoyed it & may watch again. Very timely; I'm reading The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living right now.

I'm not sure if my nutrition has me in nutritional ketosis or not since I have never tested. I am curious about NK & am reading up on the subject.

clackley 12-12-2013 07:50 PM

Deb, I am passing it along from someone else and sadly, I couldn't recall who posted it and the actual post. I really liked it and wanted others who are interested to have a chance to see it. Really glad it was interesting to you.

unna 12-12-2013 11:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DiamondDeb (Post 16716409)
Very timely; I'm reading The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living right now.

I think this book is in general good for understanding this way of eating and includes some nice examples of eating plans towards the end. This book only took me about 2 days to read.

But, I found I learned much more about this way of eating from Good Calories, Bad Calories... which I always read before bed, and it took me about a month to read! It was worth it.

clackley 12-13-2013 05:31 AM

My copy of The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living has a ton of notations, dog ears etc. that I would not loan it out. It was so informative! I should go back and read that one too!

GC/BC took me a long time to read from start to finish. It was a game changer for me and I had to reexamine so much about what I thought I already knew. It took time! The second time, I bought the audio version and found this a very pleasant way of 'reading' it and picked up stuff that I had not absorbed the first read.

The nice thing about current videos is that some of the science is being produced and can be shared and there are clearer answers to some questions.

Punkin 12-14-2013 04:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by unna (Post 16714575)
I agree, except I think for many fruit is quite hazardous to our health, despite the fact that it is natural. I ate some blueberries for breakfast the other day (with fat and protein) and I started to feel tired / fatigued.

Again, I don't think this applies to everyone. Many people can eat fruit and feel amazing.

Although, I was just watching another documentary on an African hunter-gatherer tribe. They never had anything sweet to eat except for when they happened upon the occasional beehive in a tree (which was dangerous and painful to remove). For some reason, they didn't seem to have ready access to fruit trees/berries like we imagine.

What? Really? My mother lives up north and there are wild fruit trees and plants everywhere. We used to make homemade pies and jams from wild fruit all the time when I was a kid.

clackley 12-14-2013 06:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Punkin (Post 16717763)
What? Really? My mother lives up north and there are wild fruit trees and plants everywhere. We used to make homemade pies and jams from wild fruit all the time when I was a kid.

Punkin, I doubt they were made without added sugar.

In it's natural state, it was either eaten in small quantities or not at all because it was too sour or tasteless.

Mistizoom 12-14-2013 07:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Punkin (Post 16717763)
What? Really? My mother lives up north and there are wild fruit trees and plants everywhere. We used to make homemade pies and jams from wild fruit all the time when I was a kid.

Africa does not equal "up north" either. ???

clackley 12-14-2013 07:37 AM

My daughter lived in the jungles of the DRC (very basic research camp) and they had very little fruit and only seasonally. It was much less than one might imagine. Now she was malnourished after close to a year there (with a few months back home and then back to the jungle).

unna 12-14-2013 07:38 AM

To be more specific, the documentary was about the Suri tribe in Africa.

I was actually quite shocked to find out that they don't have a multitude of beautiful fruit trees!!! I always imagined that most of the remaining hunter-gatherer tribes in Africa had access to unlimited fruit given the pleasant climate.

The ethnologist lived with the tribe for about 10 years. He said because they have absolutely nothing sweet there to eat, they basically flip out over honey when they find it.... spending hours smoking the bees out of the hive in the tree.

Anyway, if humans had evolved eating fruit as a substantial part of their diet, then we would have tooth enamel that is thicker, comparable to chimpanzees.

DiamondDeb 12-14-2013 10:54 AM

I agree that humans were not meant to eat fruit on a regular basis - anywhere. It was available seasonally in some places and it was eaten in larger amounts at that time. We instinctively crave sugar so it helped our ancestors to fatten up before the long winter with fewer food choices.

I don't need to fatten up for the long winter. :laugh:

It has been a year since I had any fruit at all. I don't even miss it. :faint: Amazing. I never would have believed it possible. I never officially eliminated it from my diet but chemical-free non-GMO fruit is not budget-friendly and I would rather spend my money on things like grass-fed beef.

DiamondDeb 12-14-2013 11:02 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by unna (Post 16716496)
I think this book is in general good for understanding this way of eating and includes some nice examples of eating plans towards the end. This book only took me about 2 days to read.

But, I found I learned much more about this way of eating from Good Calories, Bad Calories... which I always read before bed, and it took me about a month to read! It was worth it.

I think I need to hide from the world and just read it. Too many interruptions & too much time online keep me from getting it finished.

All the reviews about GCBC being a difficult read kept me from getting it. I got Why We Get Fat: And What to Do About It instead.

No matter how much we research & learn there are always new things to learn, old truths proven wrong.

clackley 12-15-2013 07:10 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DiamondDeb (Post 16718120)
I think I need to hide from the world and just read it. Too many interruptions & too much time online keep me from getting it finished.

All the reviews about GCBC being a difficult read kept me from getting it. I got Why We Get Fat: And What to Do About It instead.

No matter how much we research & learn there are always new things to learn, old truths proven wrong.

If you like listening to books, it is in an e-audio format. I have listened to it and read it.

unna 12-15-2013 10:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DiamondDeb (Post 16718120)

All the reviews about GCBC being a difficult read kept me from getting it. I got Why We Get Fat: And What to Do About It instead.

No matter how much we research & learn there are always new things to learn, old truths proven wrong.

GCBC wasn't a difficult read at all. But it was LONG and detailed. I found it was also, in parts, unnecessarily repetitive. Nonetheless, I would still recommend it as a fun read for those of us interested in the history of nutritional science. I'm sure his shorter version, Why We Get Fat, is just as good/the same as GCBC.

unna 12-15-2013 10:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by clackley (Post 16717920)
My daughter lived in the jungles of the DRC (very basic research camp) and they had very little fruit and only seasonally. It was much less than one might imagine. Now she was malnourished after close to a year there (with a few months back home and then back to the jungle).


This is intriguing. Is she a primatologist? What did she eat when she was there?

clackley 12-15-2013 11:33 AM

She is a biologist working in primatology and simultaneously hopefully getting a degree in primatology. Her work in Congo was with a world renowned primatology university in Germany. Pretty interesting stuff. I don't know where she gets the metal to do these things! Not me - that is for sure.....

The food supply was to have been fish from the river and native local foods that were supplemented by supplies of chocolate and commercial foods that visitors or new people were willing to carry into camp for the 25 km. trek.

Fishing had become unreliable and sparse so they didn't have much. I don't know how they did it. But she loved it (the experience not the lack of nutrition) and went back for another 4 months. She is currently off on another adventure in Africa in another extremely remote camp. Worrying her Mom to no end.....sigh.....

Ntombi 12-15-2013 12:02 PM

Very cool! (Not the worry or the malnutrition, but the work)


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 08:56 PM.