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Old 01-06-2007, 11:33 AM   #181
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Cinnamon Yeast Bread Recipe
I have been making a yeast bread recipe for months. Although the instructions for this bread are long, the recipe is easy. No kneading or rolling. 2 minutes in the food processor and it’s done. I am giving detailed directions because yeast breads are notoriously finicky to reproduce.

Ingredients
2 c wheat protein isolate 8000
heaping ½ cup (10 T) oat fiber
heaping ½ cup (10 T) Hi Maize 5
measure ¾ c flax seeds, then grind or 1 ½ cups flax seed meal
1 ½ t salt
1 T cinnamon
2 ½ t instant yeast

2 7/8 c hot ( from tap) water stirred ¼ t liquid splenda ( 1 c worth of sweetener)

Dump first 7 ingredients in a food processor fitted with the metal blade. Add water and Splenda. Process one minute. Divide dough in two parts. Process each one minute. Take out each loaf as finished. Shape into a more or less cylindrical shape with your hands. Place in an ungreased silicone loaf pan. (I have Kitchenaid). Cover with plastic wrap and let rise in a warm place for 2 to 2 ½ hours. Snip the tops of the loaves 30 places. Bake in a 350 degree oven for 45 minutes.



Notes:
1. I have tried to 2 rises out of my low carb yeast bread and have been unsuccessful. Therefore, I went to one rise.
2. The dough is very much like flubber. If you roll it out, it tends to snap back. It’s easier to stretch with your hands into the shape you want. It seems to even out in the oven.
3. The surface tension of the wheat protein isolate 8000 is fearsome. That’s why you need to snip the top so many times. The dough will quadruple from the beginning to the end.
4. This is a sweet dough reminiscent of cinnamon raisin bread. It was developed to appeal to a child (or me). You could probably cut the sweetener is half or even quarter it if you are sensitive to sweetness. I would not leave it out altogether, because the dough tastes bitter without some sweetener.
5. The rise is 2 to 21/2 hours, however you can leave it longer with no untoward effects. Unlike regular yeast breads which will taste fermented if you leave them too long, this bread rises just so much and stops. I think it’s because there are so few carbs to nosh on. I have left it as long as 6 hours before baking, and the loaves came out fine.
6. This makes great toast and French toast. It makes wonderful sandwiches, especially the variations. It’s a passable pizza dough. I have not gotten a good stuffing recipe yet, but I’m working on it. Ironically, it makes bad cinnamon rolls. They are too chewy.
7. I don’t know how to figure the carbs in this bread. The HiMaize 5 is the problem. Its nutritional label says it has many carbs, but it has no calories. I have been counting it as 0. YMMV I eat ½ loaf of bread a day, and have not come out of ketosis or had any side effects whatsoever. (Actually I did lose some extra weight when I started eating this. I’m on maintenance, and I didn’t expect it.) If you count the HiMaize 5 as 0, then the whole loaf has less than 5 carbs.
8. This bread makes your food processor work very hard. If the motor stalls during the first minute of processing the dough, break the dough in half sooner. If it’s still too hard on your processor, break the pieces in half again, and just stick them together to form the loaf. Add the time together so that each piece of dough gets 2 minutes of processing altogether.
9. I have accidentally added polydextrose to the recipe. (talking on the phone, not paying attention.) Polydextrose will make a denser, finer holed bread, but I had to process it at least 5 minutes until it was stretchy. I accidentally added ½ c to the reipe. I like it better without polydextrose.

Rye Yeast Bread Variation
Cut sweetener to ½ c.
Leave out cinnamon.
Add 1T unsweetened cocoa
Add 2 T caraway seeds

Flax Yeast Bread Variation
Cut sweetener to ½ cup
` Leave out cinnamon

Whole Wheat Bread Variation (still tastes like flax)
Cut sweetener to ½ cup
` Cut HiMaize 5 to ¼ cup
Add 1 cup wheat bran (I used fine wheat bran.)
Increase water to 3 cups.

Pizza Dough
Make flax seed or whole wheat bread. Add flavorings of your choice. I usually add garlic powder, onion powder, and Italian seasonings. Stretch the dough with your hands. Bake the dough completely before you put on the toppings.This dough does not stick to the pan. Don’t bother greasing it. This recipe will make 4 large pizzas. It is easier to cut it with a scissors than with a knife.
Although this dough is not perfect for pizza, it is so low carb that I can spend my carbs on the toppings, so this is the dough I use.
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Old 01-06-2007, 12:15 PM   #182
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Thanks for the recipes, Soobee...always ready to try a new bread.
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Old 01-07-2007, 06:33 AM   #183
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What is Hi Maize 5 and where do you get it?
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Old 01-07-2007, 06:41 AM   #184
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I believe Hi Maize 5 is a resistant corn starch (maize being corn).
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Old 01-07-2007, 06:42 AM   #185
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I wonder if the "260" in the name means it's the same as the rcs sold at netrition?

Quote:
Hi-maize 260, from National Starch Food Innovation, is a 5 in 1 fiber that can be used to improve the nutritional value of the foods you love to make. Hi-maize resistant starch is a natural dietary fiber from corn. It resists digestion in the small intestine and is fermented within the large intestine. Hi-maize can be added to almost any food without changing its taste or appearance. Simply replace about 10-25% of the all purpose flour you would normally use in recipes like pancakes, cookies, pancakes, cakes or other baked goods containing flour. You could also blend it into a fruit smoothie or sprinkle it over cereal in the morning. Just 15 grams of Hi-maize (about 1 heaping tablespoon) contains 9 grams of total dietary fiber, which is more than the fiber in 1/3 cup of high bran cereal and twice as much as the fiber contained in 1 cup of oatmeal.

In addition, Hi-maize has some real health benefits.

1. Hi-maize is lower in calories than the flour it replaces. Hi-maize delivers between 2-l kilocalories/gram while flour delivers 4 kilocalories/gram. Hi-maize also helps your body burn more fat and may lead to lower fat accumulation.
2. Hi-maize helps maintain healthy blood sugar levels in healthy individuals because Hi-maize increases insulin sensitivity in healthy people.
3. Hi-maize helps balance your energy in the hours following a meal. It has a lower impact in blood sugar and blood insulin than the flour it replaces. For individuals following a "carbohydrate-control" diet, it lowers the "net" or digestible carbohydrates in foods.
4. Hi-maize promotes digestive health. The fiber in Hi-maize is fermented within the large intestine and encourages the growth of friendly bacteria (a "prebiotic" fiber). It reduces harmful compounds such as ammonia, while producing beneficial compounds such as short-chain fatty acids like butyrate, the preferred fuel for colon cells. Hi-maize is ideal for use in a gluten-free diet.
5. Hi-maize is well tolerated. It is slowly fermented and does not produce the uncomfortable digestive side effects sometimes found with fiber.

More than 120 animal and human studies have been published supporting the health benefits and tolerance of Hi-maize resistant starch.

Last edited by davem; 01-07-2007 at 06:47 AM..
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Old 01-07-2007, 06:59 AM   #186
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Davem, thank you for the info. I will compare the nutritional info for resistant corn starch and the Hi Maize to see if they are the same. Sounds like they might be.
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Old 01-07-2007, 01:15 PM   #187
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Sourdough Saga, Chapter 1 She ain't pretty but she's got possibilities!

Kevin, this is all your fault for getting me started on bread baking again!

I was thinking the other day that maybe the sponge method I tried in my last loaf of Simple White Bread didn't go quite far enough. I decided to go full-bore into sourdough to see what it would do with all the funky-tasting LC baking ingredients. It's been years and years since I've had a good sourdough starter in my kitchen (I had kept one going for about eight years) and I know that developing a nice one takes a fair amount of time. So, I bought a San Francisco starter ("Gold Rush") in powdered form at Whole Foods. I've seen this brand at other health food grocery stores, Wild Oats for example. Also, if you do an internet search on sourdough starters, you'll find many sites that offer them for sale. One, Carl's, will even send it free. That particular one dates back to the Oregan Trail days and is reputed to be vigorous yet friendly and forgiving. I plan on sending for some. But I digress. I made up the packet of starter as directed on the package. I used it to make bread two days after initial rehydration. To make bread, this is what I did:

1 cup sourdough starter
1/2 cup filtered water
1 cup Carbalose
1/2 cup WPI 8000
1/2 cup WPI 5000

Mix well in crockery bowl, cover with plastic wrap and let sit overnight in a warm-ish place.

Next day, add:

2 1/2 tsp (a pkg) of yeast dissolved in 1/4 cup warm (110 degree) water with 1 teaspoon sugar
1 egg
1 T soft butter
1 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/3 cup WPI 5000
1/3 cup + 1 and 1/2 Tablespoons Resistant Wheat Starch

Knead with dough hook for about 4 minutes. It should all come together and, while somewhat soft, dough will not be overly sticky. It actually handled easily.
Form into a loaf and place in greased pan.
Bake in a preheated 425 degree oven for 15 minutes, then lower oven to 350 and bake for about another 20 minutes.

As you can see from the pictures (Thanks to DH who is not the techie idiot I am), the crust was significantly damaged when the bread was removed from the pan. At first, when looking at the baking bread through the oven window, I was very surprised and happy to see it rising, rising, rising. It was so pretty. However,it was almost impossible to remove from the pan - and I don't think it was a lack of sufficient greasing on the pan. Next time, I'll use either a bigger bread pan or make a few rolls out of the dough to reduce the amount of dough going into my regular bread pan. Baking it on a stone is another possibility.

Now, what about taste and texture? Is the bother of sourdough worth it? Well, I actually LIKE the taste of this bread! The crust is especially good - it tastes like real, crusty bread. The interior is soft and springy and has a sourdough taste. If you like the distinctive flavor of sourdough bread, you will probably like this. Haven't done it yet, but I'm guessing it will make lovely toast. I am by no means satisfied with the appearance of the bread but this is still Chapter 1...

Carb-wise, what's the damage? A cup of starter is about 1/2 cup flour, so that adds about 44 grams carbs per loaf, or roughly 3 extra carbs per slice (assuming 15 slices). I don't have a nutritional program on my computer (and haven't taken the time to compute by hand) so I don't know what my tinkering with the ratios of the two WPI's and RS have done to the original carb count. I've recently researched the effect on fermentation on wheat carbs and, boy, I guess we're really into fairly new territory here because there are no definitive answers. What is known is that sourdough breads have a significantly lower GI than non-fermented breads, so that's a plus. There's still controversy over fermentation in yogurt so I don't think a good sourdough answer is forthcoming anytime soon. Dr. Goldberg, who did the research on yogurt, basically said carbs were reduced by as much as 2/3 in the finished product. I have no idea if it can be extrapolated that grain carbs are similarly reduced. If you're a stickler for counting carbs, guess you better just add in those 3 extra carbs per slice. Now, if anybody out there has access to a chemical testing lab and would like to run a loaf through the analysis process, I'd be happy to send you one...

Sorry this is such a long post. When I do more baking/experimentation on this, I'll update.

Ginny
Attached Images
File Type: jpg whole loaf.JPG (97.9 KB, 85 views)
File Type: jpg loaf and slice.JPG (67.5 KB, 119 views)
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Old 01-07-2007, 01:49 PM   #188
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Originally Posted by rexsreine View Post
so I don't know what my tinkering with the ratios of the two WPI's and RS have done to the original carb count.Ginny
A quick tally Ginny including the starter looks like close to 75 carbs or 5 carbs a slice.

I was planning to do the sour dough one of these day but have been too lazy to do the starter......Your bread looks great and may force me into trying.....
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Old 01-07-2007, 02:14 PM   #189
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Lower than I had thought...Thanks, Kevin

Thanks for the quick tallying up of the carbs, Kevin. Five is a bit less than I had thought; I was thinking more like six or seven. Five carbs a slice means a person could make a nice sandwich with 10 carbs in bread - not too bad a deal.

I'm going to send for some of Carl's starter tomorrow. It will probably take a couple of weeks to get here. My research on it so far shows that a lot of people all over the country are using it with very good results. In the meantime, I'll continue to make a loaf of the sourdough once a week. It will be WONDERFUL fun to have a cook of your stature working on the same thing!

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Old 01-07-2007, 02:16 PM   #190
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So, how soon will this be a sticky??

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Old 01-07-2007, 06:52 PM   #191
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davem View Post
I wonder if the "260" in the name means it's the same as the rcs sold at netrition?
Yes, it is the same product. Originally marketed as HM260, then given a new spin and a better looking, catchy marketing campaign with the 5-in-1 approach.

I don't know yet if this product will be affected as will the NEW product coming out in the wheat starch (higher percentage of fiber).

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Old 01-07-2007, 07:29 PM   #192
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A sourdough sticky...

Well, if the idea of a sourdough bread sticky on a low carb forum doesn't beat all!

This evening I sliced some of the Ugly Sister loaf and toasted one side under the broiler. I then made up some garlic butter (real butter, crushed garlic) and spread on untoasted side and sprinkled with good Parmesan cheese, grated, and broiled till golden. As Rachel Ray would say "Yummo!" I felt like I was eating real garlic bread and detected nary a sniff of the LC products, the distaste for which started this whole new experiment.

I was also thinking that I, like many on this site, like Haley's Nana's Biscuits and its variations. That recipe contains a good slug of buttermilk, another acidic ingredient like sourdough. Maybe what's happening is that a distinctive yet pleasant sour flavor is covering the oddness of the LC flour stand-ins. "Plain" recipes like bread and biscuits don't have strong flavors like chocolate or cinnamon or even vanilla so something else is required. Might be something to consider when converting old favorites into legal treats.

Ginny
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Old 01-09-2007, 11:20 AM   #193
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I am so thrilled with all of the recipes in this thread. I have set a target date of 2/5/07 to reinduct (minor surgery scheduled 1/18) so I am doing my cabinet clean-out, menu planning and shopping now. I know that my success depends on my degree of preparation (physical and mental) and with the kind of support I get from this website.

I would like to know if there is a post or thread somewhere that describes the differences of the baking ingredients mentioned here, i.e., WPI 5000 vs. WPI 8000, carbalose vs. carbquick, guar gum vs. xanthan gum and guidelines when each should be used. This would be a godsend to someone who is unfamiliar with locarb baking.

Any help would be greatly appreciated. I am looking forward to my journey.
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Old 01-10-2007, 11:19 AM   #194
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It's your decision but I wouldn't start LC baking till after induction. But to answer your question there's alot of info on this site about all the products (just not in one thread but there are sticky threads on Carbalose and Carbquick) and if you click on the blue highlighted product in any thread it will take you to Netrition's site for that product and you'll see a description, ingredient list and usually nutritional info as well as cost. I've found it very helpful.

As a "quick and dirty" answer, WPI 5000 adds stretchiness and helps with rising--it's good for cakes and breads too and is much lighter than wpi8000, WPI 8000 adds structure and chewiness to breads (it's similar to vital wheat gluten but has more protein and alot less carbs). Carbalose is a low carb flour. Carbquick is like a low carb Bisquick--they start with Carbalose and add shortening and leavenings to it and I believe a touch of buttermilk. Unfortunately both have a kinda offtaste which you've read about here--the wheat resistant starch helps offset that.
Even though Carbalose is like a lc flour, it's not like white flour where one thing does it all--here you have to add stuff to get the results you want.

Xantham gum and guar gum are both normally used for thickening. But used together, you can get a synergy. They are used in this thread to help with rising (to help get that sticky-stretchiness you need for good rising).
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Old 01-10-2007, 12:28 PM   #195
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The best way is to start with some very basic recipes with easier to obtain ingredients you can find locally (flaxseed meal, soy flour, xanthan/guar gums, ground nuts or nut "flour", whey protein isolate) and get to know how some of these things work. Note that nuts & seeds are OFF the Induction list, so it's a good time to do some reading.

Then later, when you get more comfortable with the recipes and the reading/learning, you can start in with some of the more esoteric stuff...

To get you started, here is one excellent link that has a great bunch of "start-up" information for LC cooking and baking. I wish we had such a collection here (do we? am I missing something, guys?)...

Hope this helps.

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Old 01-10-2007, 09:52 PM   #196
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It's your decision but I wouldn't start LC baking till after induction. But to answer your question there's alot of info on this site about all the products (just not in one thread but there are sticky threads on Carbalose and Carbquick) and if you click on the blue highlighted product in any thread it will take you to Netrition's site for that product and you'll see a description, ingredient list and usually nutritional info as well as cost. I've found it very helpful.

As a "quick and dirty" answer, WPI 5000 adds stretchiness and helps with rising--it's good for cakes and breads too and is much lighter than wpi8000, WPI 8000 adds structure and chewiness to breads (it's similar to vital wheat gluten but has more protein and alot less carbs). Carbalose is a low carb flour. Carbquick is like a low carb Bisquick--they start with Carbalose and add shortening and leavenings to it and I believe a touch of buttermilk. Unfortunately both have a kinda offtaste which you've read about here--the wheat resistant starch helps offset that.
Even though Carbalose is like a lc flour, it's not like white flour where one thing does it all--here you have to add stuff to get the results you want.

Xantham gum and guar gum are both normally used for thickening. But used together, you can get a synergy. They are used in this thread to help with rising (to help get that sticky-stretchiness you need for good rising).
very well said!
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Old 01-11-2007, 12:51 AM   #197
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could not just pick up out of the bowl, i had to scoop the mixture into the bread pan. it is, however, raising nicely on the stove. maybe i forgot to add one of the flours, don't think i did that tho. oh well, we will see what happends. thanks for responding!
I have been curious as to what may have happened here and what was the final outcome.
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Old 01-11-2007, 11:15 AM   #198
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Ginny, Thanks for sharing your sour dough recipe. I made it just like you wrote but divided it into thirds and made a 12" pizza crust with 1 part. I par-baked the crust in a pizza pan (sprayed with Pam) for 15 minutes at 350 degrees (convection) then put the crust on a wire cooling rack (the Saltine cracker thread tip) and increased oven to 450, topped and baked for about 6 minutes.
It turned out VERY tasty. Here's a pic Thanks again, Kathy
[IMG][/IMG]
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Old 01-11-2007, 11:35 AM   #199
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Thanks everyone for the info. Just so you know, I am not going to do any of the baking for a while....just gathering info so that I have a pretty good idea of what I'm doing when I do start. As usual, the people who use this website are the best buddies you can have. Thanks again!!
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Old 01-11-2007, 12:19 PM   #200
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Ginny, Thanks for sharing your sour dough recipe. I made it just like you wrote but divided it into thirds and made a 12" pizza crust with 1 part. I par-baked the crust in a pizza pan (sprayed with Pam) for 15 minutes at 350 degrees (convection) then put the crust on a wire cooling rack (the Saltine cracker thread tip) and increased oven to 450, topped and baked for about 6 minutes.
It turned out VERY tasty. Here's a pic Thanks again, Kathy
[IMG][/IMG]
That pizza looks great. Bet no one would guess it was LC.
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Old 01-11-2007, 03:29 PM   #201
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I have been curious as to what may have happened here and what was the final outcome.
the bread rose very nicely on the stove, however, while it was cooling it settled back down to about 3 inches in height. as far as flavor and texture, i think i like it w/out the almond added into it, was a little too grainy for me. the other breads textures tasted more like white bread than this one to me. that carbalose flavor was masked a bit more w/this almond bread though. its been fun experimenting, the cinnamon/pecan rolls i made were great. keep up the good work!
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Old 01-11-2007, 05:31 PM   #202
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bassetmom, I can't help myself...everytime I see your id here on the site (NICE basset, by the way), I think of this wee image I used to use as an avatar...



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Old 01-12-2007, 08:12 AM   #203
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Looks wonderful, Kathy

The pizza looks absolutely terrific! I'm so glad someone else is doing a little experimenting with the sourdough idea. I haven't baked another loaf since my first report on this. However, I did send away for a New England starter culture - reputed to be very active - and now have this new starter developing in my kitchen. I believe the quality of the starter will have a lot to do with final texture and taste of any bread product and, let's face it, LC baking ingredients need all the help they can get!

I plan on baking another sourdough loaf tomorrow or Sunday and I'll report on it. A number of blogs on sourdough state that the Goldrush starter (the one I used originally that is readily available in packets) is not particularly reliable or vigorous.

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Old 01-12-2007, 12:42 PM   #204
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The pizza was good when fresh from the oven, but did seem to get more "chewy" when we ate some of the leftovers.
jude, I love that girl kathy
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Old 01-14-2007, 12:29 PM   #205
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Sourdough Saga, Chapter 2 "This is bread"

That's what DH said when he tried the newest version of sourdough bread. All I can say is that I'm very pleased. I taste not the slightest hint of the funky, LC ingredients that got me into this in the first place. I did have to do some tweaking to the recipe, though, and I think it's because of the different starter I used. Originally, I used the Goldrush starter you buy in packets in a natural foods grocery. It's okay - but just okay. Then I sent away for the New England starter from Fermented Treasures (online) and Carl's starter. Carl's hasn't arrived yet, but Fermented Treasures had so I made it up according to the supplied instructions. It is a beautiful, healthy starter with lots of vigorous bubbles throughout and a nice sour taste. I think it made all the difference in the finished product.

So this is what I did this time around:

1 cup SD starter
1 cup Carbalose
1/2 cup WPI 5000
1/2 cup WPI 8000
1 and 1/2 cups filtered water.This is a whole cup more than I used the first time. I couldn't get the ingredients to mix into a soft dough without the extra water. I assume it has something to do with a different starter.

Mix all well in a crockery bowl.Cover with plastic wrap and let sit overnight. This rose up quite a bit by morning.

Next day, add the following (this is where things got a little bit tricky and different from first time):

2 1/4 tsp (1 packet) yeast dissolved in 1/4 cup warm water with 1 tsp sugar
1 egg
1 T soft butter
1 1/2 tsp salt
2 tsp. baking powder
1/4 cup WPI 5000
1/3 cup + 3 T Resistant Wheat Starch
2 scant T oat fiber

Knead with a dough hook 4-5 minutes. Dough should come together but it will be rather soft. Perhaps because of the additional water added the night before, I had to add more resistant starch and the oat fiber or the mixture was simply a heavy batter. If you've made regular bread, you know how the recipe will say something like "5 to 6 cups flour" and you just have to judge what's needed. It was like that this time around.
When you've got a soft but workable consistency, remove about a third of the dough and form into 4 buns. I used my hamburger pan for this, but maybe a muffin-top pan would work or a mini-loaf pan. Use the other two-thirds to form a loaf and place in greased pan. Let rise till double.
Bake in preheated 400 degree (I lowered the temp this time) oven for 15 and then lower oven to 350 and bake about 30 minutes. Buns did not take as long, so check them after 15-20 minutes.

I made the bread Saturday and thought it very, very good. Today, I still love it, but noticed it has become a bit chewier and drier. I'm thinking that the bread may need to be cooled, sliced, and frozen on the day it's baked. Then you would just take out what you need and thaw. I'm going to try that next time.

Even though I've tinkered again with the proportions of the WPI and the resistant starch and added a bit of oat fiber, I doubt the carb count per slice is much different than before, probably still around 5 per slice or half-bun. There might even be more fiber to it.

Next time, I'm going to weigh the ingredients to try to get a more standardized recipe. And, following Kathy's lead, I'll make a pizza crust. If anyone else tries bread, rolls, or pizza, please post your results.

Question for Kevin: Your recipe, upon which I based this, uses baking powder. What does it do? Add a little more rising power?

Again, sorry for such a long post.
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Old 01-14-2007, 01:00 PM   #206
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Originally Posted by rexsreine View Post
Question for Kevin: Your recipe, upon which I based this, uses baking powder. What does it do? Add a little more rising power?
Yes, without it I saw a significant difference.

Very nice looking sourdough BTW.

Last edited by Kevinpa; 01-14-2007 at 01:12 PM..
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Old 01-14-2007, 01:13 PM   #207
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Thanks, Kevin

Okay, so the baking powder will stay in the recipe. I was considering leaving it out because I thought it might be "diluting" the sourdough taste, but a reduction in the rise isn't worth it.

Ginny
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Old 01-14-2007, 02:45 PM   #208
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these almost made me wet my pants with glee!
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Old 01-14-2007, 03:20 PM   #209
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ok, kevin could you please help me. I'm so confused.


Each recipe looks better than the last could you please post for me the best white bread recipe (i've never made bread, the only attachement i have for a food processor is the sharp metal blade with two projections i use to cut things upl... i cant use that right? you have a picture of it on the right hand side of one of your posts)


also besides the best white bread, which makes the best pizza dough? I'll assume i can make hotdog and hamburger buns with the white bread correct?

thank you so much you are the BOMB. to think i can have toast with out stressing out again. I used to eat on skinny too light of a piece of low carb bread for 5-8 carbs and no way would one be enough..now i can have 2 and not even blink
!!!!!!



i cant wait to make pizza, my family orders pizza every friday NOW I CAN EAT IT TOO and not thing "blech this flax crust is gross but i'll pretend its good" hehehe
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Old 01-14-2007, 03:40 PM   #210
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Originally Posted by nurseypoo5 View Post
ok, kevin could you please help me. I'm so confused.


Each recipe looks better than the last could you please post for me the best white bread recipe (i've never made bread, the only attachement i have for a food processor is the sharp metal blade with two projections i use to cut things upl... i cant use that right? you have a picture of it on the right hand side of one of your posts)


also besides the best white bread, which makes the best pizza dough? I'll assume i can make hotdog and hamburger buns with the white bread correct?

thank you so much you are the BOMB. to think i can have toast with out stressing out again. I used to eat on skinny too light of a piece of low carb bread for 5-8 carbs and no way would one be enough..now i can have 2 and not even blink
!!!!!!



i cant wait to make pizza, my family orders pizza every friday NOW I CAN EAT IT TOO and not thing "blech this flax crust is gross but i'll pretend its good" hehehe

First off Nursey, My favorite so far for taste is the carbquik version. That being said I don't make mine in a food processor. I was just showing a picture of the blades for those who didn't know. When I do my bread I use my Kitchen Aid mixer. For me that is the simplest method.

As far as the pizza dough goes, that was made with ginny's sourdough recipe and unless you are familiar with making breads then that is not the recipe to start with.

The hot dog buns were made by Jackie and yes I believe that she did use the white bread recipe.
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