Low Carb Friends

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-   The Maintain Lane (http://www.lowcarbfriends.com/bbs/maintain-lane/)
-   -   Keeping it off? (http://www.lowcarbfriends.com/bbs/maintain-lane/807124-keeping-off.html)

Grammy G 06-30-2013 12:22 PM

Keeping it off?
 
I still have some weight to lose before I'll be maintaining. But, I keep wondering how I can change things THIS TIME to keep the weight off. I've lost and gained more times than I can count over the years.

Any suggestions?

Also, I'm 56 years old and as I'm losing weight the old skin is not bouncing back like it used to. I'm looking more wrinkled on my arms and my face. Is this normal for my age? :-) Or will it remember what to do once I'm done losing?

Thanks!

shipshemom 06-30-2013 04:57 PM

I maintain my weight loss by weighing every morning to make sure I stay within 5 lbs. of my goal. It really shows me how going off plan for even a few days causes weight to creep back on. I don't get stressed
if I've gained a few lbs, but just eat more strict to take them off. I stay on my eating plan as much as possible as a way of life & go right back to it if I stray. I also have not kept any "fat" clothes as motivation that if I regain, I have to buy bigger clothes, which I do not want to do.

Grammy G 06-30-2013 05:01 PM

Thank you ship. How long have you kept the weight off? I've lost weight in the past and kept it off for 3 years only to put it back on. I'm sure it's because I was craving carbs and started adding them back in to my life. I just hope that it's possible to not have that happen again.

Leo41 07-01-2013 07:29 AM

Hi Grammy G-
I've been maintaining for just about 3 years and am determined NOT to regain. I'm 71, and I basically eat similar to how I was eating when I got to my current weight. I happen to be very carb sensitive and keep carbs to <20g, and I also have to keep my calories low as well (issues of age and hypothyroidism).

But I've found that my body is totally satisfied with this WOE. It's my 'head' that wants to feed my body a lot more! I've found that the challenges of maintenance, while different from those of weight loss, are actually tougher than I expected. It's been an interesting learning process, and I'm still learning.

For me, weight management will be a lifetime challenge, but maintaining my weight is worth any effort, as I was morbidly obese my entire life until 3 years ago. Now in my old age, I have a new life!

shipshemom 07-01-2013 11:13 AM

I've kept the weight off for 2 yrs. Since I'm so petite, weight gain really shows on me. I am very carb sensitive like Leo41 w/ similar a eating style. I still get carb cravings & give in sometimes, but I go right back to my WOE instead of giving up & returning to my old eating habits. I keep reminding yourself that this is how I HAVE to eat. I try to stay prepared w/ food & snacking choices. I agree that it's still a matter of will power & choice. It's not just a diet.

SlowSure 07-05-2013 03:48 AM

I'm just starting along this road (I made my goal weight just 5 days ago). I plan to continue weighing and recording my weight and to monitor my food for carb creep. (I'm controlling migraine through a ketogenic WOE and so far it's working for me.)

I'd like to start working on reducing my bodyfat percentage and increasing my muscle mass as I have some mobility issues from time to time and feel that a stronger core would be of tremendous assistance to me.

Grammy G 07-05-2013 11:02 PM

SlowSure.. Congrats! I'm so happy for you. I've never heard of controlling migraines through ketogenic WOE. Do you have any favorite articles?

SlowSure 07-06-2013 01:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Grammy G (Post 16502011)
SlowSure.. Congrats! I'm so happy for you. I've never heard of controlling migraines through ketogenic WOE. Do you have any favorite articles?

I wrote up some information here in post 6 and later in that thread - I'll add in some more when I can: http://www.lowcarbfriends.com/bbs/nu...ight-loss.html

Aomiel 07-11-2013 08:23 AM

Grammy,
I'm 57 and have taken a couple years to get to maintenance. Not because of the diet failing me, but because I'd lose a bunch and then go off. I never gained it back though so the next time I'd go on lc, I'd take off another chunk.

I've been at maintenance now for a little over 3 months and so far I've been successful because I keep reminding myself how I used to feel when eating carbs. Plus, have to admit, being off all diabetic meds and having an A1C of 5-6 helps.

My family has pretty good genetics as far as how youthful we look...which is due to retaining skin elasticity for far longer. My mom is 76 and looks as if she's in her early 60's. Her mom was in her late 80's and looked no more than 70. Most people think I'm in my early 40's. So I wasn't too surprised to see that my skin has tightened up a bit. I'm sure I'll still have sags and wrinkles from abusing my poor skin, but that's ok. Most are hidden under skirts or sleeveless shirts and a great fitting bra works wonders. :hyst:

Besides...could be worse. I could still be filling out all that skin!

FlorayG 07-15-2013 04:42 AM

I took a year to reach my goal weight and then started adding carbs back in gradually. Trouble is, gradually doesn't know when to stop. recently I found I was starting to crave carbs again so I weighed myself - don't do that much any more - and yep, I'd put 4lb on. So I think you have to watch your own intake of carbs for the rest of your life and when you find yourself eating chips with your dinner AND THEN picking at somebody else's chips (I did, I did, :o it's what tipped me off about the craving returning) You know you've lost it and need to get strict again.
Basically, you have to be prepared keep this as a diet for the rest of your life. No more chips for me (although in my defence they were the first I'd had in MONTHS)

SlowSure 07-15-2013 05:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by FlorayG (Post 16515418)
I took a year to reach my goal weight and then started adding carbs back in gradually. Trouble is, gradually doesn't know when to stop....when you find yourself eating chips with your dinner AND THEN picking at somebody else's chips (I did, I did, :o it's what tipped me off about the craving returning)

I completely understand this :rofl: :o Chips, puffed out, crispy, and that special mix of sweet savouriness are just so seductive. :love: Chips and roast potato. :heart: :)

So few people cook them well tho' that I'm usually saved from myself as it's usually not worth eating them away from home. As I do the cooking at home, they rarely make it onto the menu. Which is a little :sad: but it's for the best. :) And your post has just reinforced that for me.

FlorayG 07-15-2013 07:48 AM

But you know what? Even as I was eating those chips I was thinking "why aren't these working? Why am I still hungry? This never happens when I eat a pork chop!"
I have come back to these fora because I think you need help and support in keeping to your lifestyle as there is so much rubbish food so easily available and it's so easy to slip and think ' oh, one bread roll won't hurt'...:down:

Rick-g 08-10-2013 06:37 PM

It's been 6 years for me and I watch close, I never want to have to win that war again so I fight small battles every day. I'm careful to never get more than 5lbs away from goal or I go into lock down mode LOL!

Grammy G 08-11-2013 08:26 AM

So what do you do when the craving comes back? What is your 'get back on the wagon' plan? Specifically?

Rick-g 08-11-2013 09:00 AM

It truly is a mind over "fatter" thing, If my weight goes up I tighten my carb/calorie count. I just refuse to let something I eat bring me some where I don't want to be.

Leo41 08-12-2013 02:11 PM

I have what a friend calls "crazy fat person thoughts" occasionally. Sometimes I can abolish them, but there are times when I binge--total out-of-control eating. But I make sure that it is never more than one day, and I do 'damage control' by going back into weight-loss mode immediately.

I so enjoy where I am now that I want to never go back to that obese individual--and I exert control to insure that I don't. I've been maintaining for 3 years this summer.

Big_Al 08-13-2013 05:29 PM

I am like most here (been maintaining about 3 years).
  • I weigh myself every morning
  • I stick to less than 20 carbs per day (unless it is summer and I drink beer when doing yardwork :) )
  • I am very active now with gardening and P90 workouts daily
  • When I fall off the wagon (or can't stay on when traveling overseas), I dust myself off and get back into the groove

Nothing magical really. The key for me is not to take anything for granted and work everyday to make low-carb my permanent way of live.

momov2boys 08-13-2013 08:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Big_Al (Post 16558352)
The key for me is not to take anything for granted and work everyday to make low-carb my permanent way of live.

:goodpost:

peanutte 08-14-2013 05:57 PM

Rick, I didn't realize it has been that long for you! Congratulations. I know you are really serious about your maintenance, and I like your "mind over fatter" phrase.

Everybody has already said the basic stuff I would say: weigh yourself, stay on top of it, never let a couple of pounds become more, always be vigilant. In addition I would add: I make a point of consciously reducing the value and importance of food in my life. This amounts to heresy in our culture, but you wouldn't notice until you start practicing it--which most of us have, to one degree or another, simply by deciding to lose weight and eating how we needed to eat in order to accomplish that.

Maybe this will sound a little weird, but I don't want to glamorize food. There are times and places for extraordinary eating experiences, but in my life, those are few and far between. Food is enjoyable, but no more so than a lot of other things in life: sleep is enjoyable. Hobbies are enjoyable. Exercise can be enjoyable; so can work. Reading, TV, entertainment, music are all enjoyable. Friendships and relationships can be enjoyable.

Food should be mixed right in there with everything else. In my mind, it should not be elevated to some special place. Anyway, most of the food we eat impulsively because of a strong craving, or mindlessly because it's there, is really not that good once we're eating it. So I remind myself of this.

What I'm seeking to do is create some distance from food--while our culture encourages us to feel entitled and deserving and rewarded, and like we can't possibly live without the pleasure (which truly is not all that pleasurable) and the excitement (which really is not all that exciting) of food and eating.

I'm not saying our food shouldn't taste good; it will and it does. It just doesn't have to be as big of a deal as we're conditioned to expect. I think we all know that when we were heavier, food was not the answer to anything worthwhile, in the long run--and it didn't reward us; we unwittingly used it to cheat ourselves out of a lot of things we now get to enjoy every day, because we worked hard to get here.

In my experience and opinion, if you get used to this mentality, and take the time to develop more self-awareness and consistent habits, you can then learn to pick and choose your "special" or "exceptional" meals, or single higher-carb foods, when you plan to have them. That is different from an overwhelming urge or a momentary lapse of judgement. It's like a person who was a compulsive and mindless shopper, filling up her house with unnecessary stuff to the point of not even valuing it, vs. someone who is frugal all the time but will once in a while decide to splurge on something she really wants and knows she can afford.

That's my take on it. Like Leo and Al, I'm at three years of maintenance now, and what's most important to me is not whether it's been one year or two or five (though I hope to see 5 in two more years)--it's that I have not regained out of my three-pound range of 117-120. Most weeks, I am still 118, and that matters to me. Frankly, it was hard to lose all that weight, it took a long time, and I do not want to have to ever do it again, not even five pounds.

momov2boys 08-22-2013 05:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by peanutte (Post 16559685)
Rick, I didn't realize it has been that long for you! Congratulations. I know you are really serious about your maintenance, and I like your "mind over fatter" phrase.

Everybody has already said the basic stuff I would say: weigh yourself, stay on top of it, never let a couple of pounds become more, always be vigilant. In addition I would add: I make a point of consciously reducing the value and importance of food in my life. This amounts to heresy in our culture, but you wouldn't notice until you start practicing it--which most of us have, to one degree or another, simply by deciding to lose weight and eating how we needed to eat in order to accomplish that.

Maybe this will sound a little weird, but I don't want to glamorize food. There are times and places for extraordinary eating experiences, but in my life, those are few and far between. Food is enjoyable, but no more so than a lot of other things in life: sleep is enjoyable. Hobbies are enjoyable. Exercise can be enjoyable; so can work. Reading, TV, entertainment, music are all enjoyable. Friendships and relationships can be enjoyable.

Food should be mixed right in there with everything else. In my mind, it should not be elevated to some special place. Anyway, most of the food we eat impulsively because of a strong craving, or mindlessly because it's there, is really not that good once we're eating it. So I remind myself of this.

What I'm seeking to do is create some distance from food--while our culture encourages us to feel entitled and deserving and rewarded, and like we can't possibly live without the pleasure (which truly is not all that pleasurable) and the excitement (which really is not all that exciting) of food and eating.

I'm not saying our food shouldn't taste good; it will and it does. It just doesn't have to be as big of a deal as we're conditioned to expect.
I think we all know that when we were heavier, food was not the answer to anything worthwhile, in the long run--and it didn't reward us; we unwittingly used it to cheat ourselves out of a lot of things we now get to enjoy every day, because we worked hard to get here.

In my experience and opinion, if you get used to this mentality, and take the time to develop more self-awareness and consistent habits, you can then learn to pick and choose your "special" or "exceptional" meals, or single higher-carb foods, when you plan to have them. That is different from an overwhelming urge or a momentary lapse of judgement. It's like a person who was a compulsive and mindless shopper, filling up her house with unnecessary stuff to the point of not even valuing it, vs. someone who is frugal all the time but will once in a while decide to splurge on something she really wants and knows she can afford.

That's my take on it. Like Leo and Al, I'm at three years of maintenance now, and what's most important to me is not whether it's been one year or two or five (though I hope to see 5 in two more years)--it's that I have not regained out of my three-pound range of 117-120. Most weeks, I am still 118, and that matters to me. Frankly, it was hard to lose all that weight, it took a long time, and I do not want to have to ever do it again, not even five pounds.

:goodpost::goodpost::goodpost:

WOW... Peanutte's post it so awesome; I'm saving to reread, lots!

THANK YOU!!!

martha 08-24-2013 05:23 PM

I agree. A really good, thoughtful read.


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