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SchoolPsych1979 09-19-2013 12:21 PM

Something from Atkins 72' book that resounded with me
 
For those who have read Atkins 72, he mentions something and I wanted to start a discussion to see if you can relate.

I don't have the book in front of me so I can't reference. But he mentions that the younger you have had a weight issue (goes back to toddler-age), the more you need a carb-restricted diet. Do you think that's true?

snowangel9 09-19-2013 12:33 PM

Yep. I do. From what I've been read ( Maria Emmerich ) if you've had a 'weight' issue that young, you must be really sensitive to starches... So yeah, I can believe that. I wish I had know when my kids were young the information I've been reading now..

pickles1010 09-19-2013 01:58 PM

Yes I do. I grew up in post-war Germany and we mostly ate Potatoes and Bread based meals. We were lucky to have a small garden and so had veggies also. Typical day's meals were :

B : Oatmeal cooked in milk with a bit of sugar.
School : Sandwich w/ butter and jelly
Main Meal ( 1 PM ) Some kind of Potato, and a vegetable.
Mid afternoon : Bread and jelly ( or Cake on Sunday )
Evening : leftovers.

We didn't have meat often and when, we shared amongst 4. Eggs could be bought by the piece and mostly for baking.
So no wonder I was heavy, but not obese by todays standards, since there was no eating in between meals.

Purple Crayon 09-19-2013 02:09 PM

Yes. And I think it goes back to in utero.

Michael Eades wrote about fetal programming in his blog Dec 9, 2008. Here is an excerpt. You can google Eades Oprah's Plight and pull up the whole article.

"When pregnant women load up on refined carbohydrates during pregnancy, especially during the first trimester, they end up damaging the developing pancreas of the fetus. The pancreas is pretty much developed during the first trimester, so a chronic high load of glucose in the motherís blood that crosses the placenta ends up programming the fetal pancreas in much the same way that a huge chronic glucose load over a long time in adults creates insulin resistance. This situation has been published about extensively in the medical literature. The phenomenon is called fetal programming. Babies born are basically programed to become insulin resistant and obese. These kids tend to develop obesity and insulin resistance more easily than others and have a tougher time dealing with it. Iím sure that Oprah falls into this category.

Just like any adults who have glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, and/or diabetes, these fetally-programmed people tend to do better on low-carbohydrate diets than on low-fat/high-carb diets."

SpunkiMama 09-19-2013 02:13 PM

I also believe that to be true, my 11yr old holds on to his weight, and he is a very active little guy into every sport, always outside playing, etc but his weight just holds on.. He is on a very modified low carb diet as in, I have cut him wayyy back, and I do notice that his tummy is flattening some..if I can get him into the habit of No Starches at every meal, etc..then I am well on my way...however, he is 11 and I am not putting him on a "diet" per se , however, the meals that I cook are low carb, and he doesnt know a thing about low carb, he just gobbles it up likes its the best stuff ever made.. haha

I think he has an issue with carbs, & I'm trying to address it now, at a young age.

susan41 09-19-2013 02:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Purple Crayon (Post 16611461)
Yes. And I think it goes back to in utero.

Michael Eades wrote about fetal programming in his blog Dec 9, 2008. Here is an excerpt. You can google Eades Oprah's Plight and pull up the whole article.

"When pregnant women load up on refined carbohydrates during pregnancy, especially during the first trimester, they end up damaging the developing pancreas of the fetus. The pancreas is pretty much developed during the first trimester, so a chronic high load of glucose in the motherís blood that crosses the placenta ends up programming the fetal pancreas in much the same way that a huge chronic glucose load over a long time in adults creates insulin resistance. This situation has been published about extensively in the medical literature. The phenomenon is called fetal programming. Babies born are basically programed to become insulin resistant and obese. These kids tend to develop obesity and insulin resistance more easily than others and have a tougher time dealing with it. Iím sure that Oprah falls into this category.

Just like any adults who have glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, and/or diabetes, these fetally-programmed people tend to do better on low-carbohydrate diets than on low-fat/high-carb diets."


Great, another "mothers guilt" as I was a poor broke single mama for most their lives and during both pregnancies, beans, potatoes, tortillas, Mac n cheese etc were primary in my and then their diets. Both my now grown kids are overweight :(

I've got my daughter turning towards more LC and my son asked me today what he would need to cut back on to lose. So maybe in can turn the page for them.

SchoolPsych1979 09-19-2013 02:57 PM

All good thoughts!
I remember having a sweet tooth since I was like 9! Always wanting cake, candy, etc. So I think for me it started at a young age. When I look at my history, I'm like, geez, it has been a long time!

br3n 09-19-2013 03:22 PM

It certainly seems believable in my case. I have always loved carbs more than anything else, I even went vegetarian for 8 years with no problem because I loaded up on carbs and veggies. I have always been "thick" since at least the age of 12 -- even when I was active in sports, I have also always had a lower stomach pooch which is unusual for kids. I'm pretty sure I have some kind of intolerance involving carbs. Once I stopped sports and got my desk job at an early age, the weight really started to pile on, even when watching overall calories. The best I can do is maintain, but never lose on that type of diet. Now I'm going to try LC and see if it makes a difference. Of course, there are many theories out there. Some even suggest that blood types play a role in what type of foods an individual should eat and/or avoid. It seems like I remember reading that it was basically meat and veggies for my blood type and I probably don't eat enough of either as it is. Go figure! :dunno:

Evil carbs. :yummy:

Edit: another point to add now that I'm thinking about it is that I had a stay at home mom who always prepared traditional, relatively healthy, meals: protein + veg + starch, so it's not like I was living on fast food and junk. We didn't have much money so we rarely dined out. I definitely didn't get much candy or junk, I would even get yelled at for getting into the pickle jar.. aack. It's interesting when I think back on it, I honestly don't know why I was bigger than most other kids. We DID eat a lot of carbs because they're cheap -- oatmeal, cereal, pasta, bread, potatoes, rice - pretty much every meal.

seaofsand 09-19-2013 03:50 PM

It was true for me. I was a thin kid up until I turned nine or ten, and then the weight hit me. This was due to both our carb-filled diet at home, and to the fact that I stopped being active around that age. I spent most of my early childhood running around outside and bicycling, and then we got cable and a video game system when I was ten. The weight piled on from there. And my mom cooked nothing but carbs when we were kids. Spaghetti, macaroni, potatoes, etc., every week. And we drank sodas with every almost meal. By the time I was an older teenager, I was struggling badly with my weight. I wish so much that I had known about low carb eating back then. My doctor put me on a low calorie diet when I was 16, and it worked for a while until, as always, low calorie eating caught up with me and I ended up gaining all the weight back plus 25 pounds. I totally lost control of my eating. Sadly, I think I just became another typical American at this point: too much sugar, not enough activity. If I ever have kids, I will try my hardest to make sure they grow up living a low carb lifestyle. I don't want them struggling the way I did with self-esteem and health problems.

tymom 09-21-2013 08:59 AM

my son is 19 now and has the propensity for roundness... but his is not. The most significant thing he did was drop soda when he was 14, and just like that he shed 5 lbs without trying and has never looked back. Now he is in the gym everyday at college and is quite "ripped" as they say... :) Sidenote- his major is health and human performance and i am sure the nutrition classes will teach him all the wrong stuff :(

spareld 09-21-2013 11:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Purple Crayon (Post 16611461)
Yes. And I think it goes back to in utero.

Michael Eades wrote about fetal programming in his blog Dec 9, 2008. Here is an excerpt. You can google Eades Oprah's Plight and pull up the whole article.

"When pregnant women load up on refined carbohydrates during pregnancy, especially during the first trimester, they end up damaging the developing pancreas of the fetus. The pancreas is pretty much developed during the first trimester, so a chronic high load of glucose in the motherís blood that crosses the placenta ends up programming the fetal pancreas in much the same way that a huge chronic glucose load over a long time in adults creates insulin resistance. This situation has been published about extensively in the medical literature. The phenomenon is called fetal programming. Babies born are basically programed to become insulin resistant and obese. These kids tend to develop obesity and insulin resistance more easily than others and have a tougher time dealing with it. Iím sure that Oprah falls into this category.

Just like any adults who have glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, and/or diabetes, these fetally-programmed people tend to do better on low-carbohydrate diets than on low-fat/high-carb diets."

wow I remember reading about a woman delivering a 13 pound baby. I think she may have been eating too many carbs.


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