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Old 07-22-2013, 09:11 AM   #1
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Egg question

When I put a raw egg into one of the online food logs and then put a boiled egg in, the boiled egg is 5 calories more and a couple grams of carbs more. Since nothing is added to the egg when it's boiled, why is this?
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Old 07-22-2013, 09:23 AM   #2
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Probably because of the way calories are measured-- the change in chemical bonds of the cooked egg will offer more combustable material than the unchanged, uncooked gooey raw egg. I'm no chemist, but as I understand it, the chemical bonds change, especially in the yolk part, when it is cooked.

Either that, or the trackers are wonky.
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Old 07-22-2013, 09:52 AM   #3
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There are a bunch of items that change the carb count when cooked. I don't understand that at all...except maybe in a vegetables case where you get more to a cup when it cooks down.
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Old 07-22-2013, 10:03 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by emel View Post
Probably because of the way calories are measured-- the change in chemical bonds of the cooked egg will offer more combustable material than the unchanged, uncooked gooey raw egg. I'm no chemist, but as I understand it, the chemical bonds change, especially in the yolk part, when it is cooked.

Either that, or the trackers are wonky.
I think your first paragraph is it. I looked at the USDA food database, and for a large egg there is 72 calories raw or around 90 or so cooked (fried, scrambled, or omlet). It doesn't have hard-boiled listed though. I can't imagine they would include any cooking fat in the calcuation without indicating that - could they?

For veggies, I know cooking makes some of them more digestable and thus some calories are more readily available. Dr. Bernstein addresses this in his books, I believe.

Last edited by Mistizoom; 07-22-2013 at 10:04 AM..
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