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-   -   Peter Attia's TEDMED Talk (http://www.lowcarbfriends.com/bbs/main-lowcarb-lobby/806908-peter-attias-tedmed-talk.html)

Janknitz 06-26-2013 01:01 PM

Peter Attia's TEDMED Talk
 
I'm sorry if someone posted about this already, but if you haven't seen this TED Talk, you'll be awestruck. Do a search and watch it--15 minutes of your life well spent. Make sure you have tissues handy.


Peter Attia and Gary Taubes are the founders of NuSi, which endeavors to do rigorous, evidence based scientific study of metabolic nutrition.

GME 06-26-2013 01:26 PM

Thanks, I'll watch when I get home tonight. I love TED talks.

ravenrose 06-26-2013 04:04 PM

This is very touching. I hope it gets people's attention!

I have to say I was disappointed in his presentation of the "what if obesity is only a proxy" argument. I TOTALLY agree with this, and yet I didn't think his logic held up very well. I hope the other doctors don't feel that way.

Janknitz 06-26-2013 04:44 PM

What disappointed you?

I was definitely IR long before I was obese. I was a very skinny, underweight child, thin young woman, and I had the worst hypoglycemia all along. My diet was terrible, I was so thin everyone used to feed me sweets because it looked like I could eat anything. My metabolism was a mess, I had PCOS, too. (weight didn't come on until my mid-30's after my first child).

Doctors look at me and respond to me very differently now that I'm an obese woman instead of a thin woman with the EXACT same issues. I hear and see them say and think "if you'd only lose weight . . ." I want to scream at them that I used to be thin and have these problems too, but they'd never even believe me.

It's nice to see someone like Attia --who can come off as pretty arrogant--"getting" it.

Garlic 06-26-2013 04:47 PM

I have to say that as of a week ago I had never heard of this guy.... Now I have watched a few videos, and done some basic reading on him.... and I really like this guy. And I believe him. I just watched the TED TALK, and I was fascinated and emotionally moved. I sure hope he is right, as I am pretty much aligning myself with his way of thinking.

LCWizard 06-26-2013 04:55 PM

Thanks! I'll watch it.

rndiane 06-26-2013 05:04 PM

Thank you for posting this. I watched TEDMED then searched Dr Attia on YouTube. I enjoyed the videos very much. I have not heard of him before and hope more people in the health care system get on board. Thankfully, my Internal Medicine MD is completely behind me and encourages me with this WOE.

Janknitz 06-26-2013 06:09 PM

Peter has a blog, but it's deep, DEEP science. Sometimes I get lost in what he's saying--there's a FIFTEEN part series on cholesterol (Straight Dope on Cholesterol) and he never quite concludes it with what I was wading through all those parts for--WHAT TO EAT???? Nevertheless, it's fascinating.

TEDMED promoters do a lot of work with the presenters to do the best possible presentations, and he describes the process on his blog (that's an interesting topic all on its own!). I've seen and heard other interviews he's done and he's very much in the head. This time he was very much in the heart, and WOW, what an incredible impact!

I listen to the Ted Talk podcasts on my iPhone and they are great. It reminds me a lot of reading Smithsonian Magazine--you never know what you are going to find and it's the most interesting things you never thought about before.

rubidoux 06-26-2013 07:20 PM

I saw it last night and I thought it was great. And it reminded me, sadly, that one of my major motivations for losing weight is that I was worried that if something really terrible went wrong with my diabetes, that I would not be able to get the best treatment if I was fat. I was especially worried that I'd need a kidney one day and not be able to get one. I'm sure, as he said, that Attia gave the diabetic woman he treated technically good care, but I have to wonder if when a doctor's heart isn't in it... Well, let's just say I would like for my doctors to feel as emotionally invested as possible and not let themselves off the hook bc they've found some reason to blame me for my condition.

I hope that this and future work from the Taubes/Attia corner will make some impact on how we as a culture see fat people. I don't have high hopes for that, but I do think its great that anybody at all is saying that the way we view fat people is wrong.

I have for a long time, long before discovering Atkins in 2000, been saying that type II's don't get diabetes from being fat, but have some underlying condition that causes both to happen. (I know that's not spot on with what he's saying but it's pretty close.) But, jeez, I have very little science background and I can see that... Why on earth has it taken this long for someone in the medical field to see it? And how could it be that doctors (have to assume -- and the reality is that we all KNOW -- that many, many of them think the same way Attia did) don't question the common wisdom??? It really burns me up! :mad: (Though using the angry smilie guy always makes me feel better. lol)

As for the science part of it all, he actually said a few things that surprised me. One that I thought was really interesting was that skinny people with IR have worse outcomes and that he thinks the fat storage thing is a protective mechanism. And the thing about fat people who are not IR not have the bad health outcomes that people with IR have. So interesting! I wonder if the HAES/fat acceptance community is talking about this and excited about it.

BTW, this seems less important somehow now that I'm basically a normal-weighted person (I'm still technically "obese", but I could swear I'm really very close to "normal"), but I have looked for and wondered if there is such a thing as a busy fat acceptance community online, like a forum (I know there's quite a blog circuit, but I don't feel at home with those somehow, I can read but don't get how you interact, really). I've looked and have only found ones where there hasn't been a new post in four months. Anyone know???

emel 06-27-2013 04:00 AM

Attia is the one who turned to Phinney and Volek for help because he was extremely metabolically resistant and had to go quite low on carbs, right? (sorry, I've read so much I get mixed up sometimes)

And Jayne, about the medical care issue-- did you see that cartoon where there was a rhinoceros with his horn stuck into the patient's spine and the doctor was saying "I can't diagnose your pain until you lose some weight." ?

Mistizoom 06-27-2013 07:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by emel (Post 16489053)
Attia is the one who turned to Phinney and Volek for help because he was extremely metabolically resistant and had to go quite low on carbs, right? (sorry, I've read so much I get mixed up sometimes)

I think he turned to Phinney and Volek when he couldn't lose more than 20 lbs. (he had 40 lbs. total to lose) and they told him to cut the protein, among other things. I think he was eating something like 220 g of protein a day on low carb intitially? In an interview I saw with the Diet Doctor (LCHF) he stated he was "on the edge of metabolic syndrome" rather than having it full blown like the TEDMED talk seemed to indicate. I am sure he has some insulin resistance, but I don't think it is as bad as many of us who have been extremely fat for long periods of time. He only gained the weight about 4 years ago it sounds like.

Mistizoom 06-27-2013 07:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rubidoux (Post 16488789)
BTW, this seems less important somehow now that I'm basically a normal-weighted person (I'm still technically "obese", but I could swear I'm really very close to "normal"), but I have looked for and wondered if there is such a thing as a busy fat acceptance community online, like a forum (I know there's quite a blog circuit, but I don't feel at home with those somehow, I can read but don't get how you interact, really). I've looked and have only found ones where there hasn't been a new post in four months. Anyone know???

I haven't been involved in the Fat Acceptance movement for quite a while, but it seems like the forum at Dimensions Online is fairly active. The main forum looks pretty good, but some of the subforums seem to have a meet/meat market quality to them.

Coffee 06-27-2013 08:32 AM

WOW, I Really like that!!!!!

rubidoux 06-27-2013 11:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mistizoom (Post 16489445)
I haven't been involved in the Fat Acceptance movement for quite a while, but it seems like the forum at Dimensions Online is fairly active. The main forum looks pretty good, but some of the subforums seem to have a meet/meat market quality to them.

Thanks, Mistizoom! :)

clackley 06-27-2013 04:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mistizoom (Post 16489431)
I think he turned to Phinney and Volek when he couldn't lose more than 20 lbs. (he had 40 lbs. total to lose) and they told him to cut the protein, among other things. I think he was eating something like 220 g of protein a day on low carb intitially? In an interview I saw with the Diet Doctor (LCHF) he stated he was "on the edge of metabolic syndrome" rather than having it full blown like the TEDMED talk seemed to indicate. I am sure he has some insulin resistance, but I don't think it is as bad as many of us who have been extremely fat for long periods of time. He only gained the weight about 4 years ago it sounds like.

I think he may have been fighting the lbs for a lot longer than 4 yrs with tons of exercise and low fat woe and found that he continued to gain. He has a distinct familial path of metabolic disease.

He was able to turn around his insulin resistance pretty effectively. He is a young man and due to the comparatively fewer yrs. he spent eating the wrong way, his 'recovery' will be easier and shorter.

I do think that like any other chronic disease, the longer one continues on the path of ever worsening disease the less likely it is to reverse it completely and certainly, the longer it will take. I hold hope that recovery can take up to 8 yrs. which means I have another 4 yrs. to fully realize my n.k. eating plan's full potential. This comes from Dr. Lutz's writings of his clinical experiences (Life Without Bread).

rubidoux 06-27-2013 05:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by clackley (Post 16490297)
I think he may have been fighting the lbs for a lot longer than 4 yrs with tons of exercise and low fat woe and found that he continued to gain. He has a distinct familial path of metabolic disease.

He was able to turn around his insulin resistance pretty effectively. He is a young man and due to the comparatively fewer yrs. he spent eating the wrong way, his 'recovery' will be easier and shorter.

I do think that like any other chronic disease, the longer one continues on the path of ever worsening disease the less likely it is to reverse it completely and certainly, the longer it will take. I hold hope that recovery can take up to 8 yrs. which means I have another 4 yrs. to fully realize my n.k. eating plan's full potential. This comes from Dr. Lutz's writings of his clinical experiences (Life Without Bread).

That eight year thing is interesting. I like the idea of continuing improvement. :) I may have to go look for Life Without Bread.

And wow, I woulda been so much better off if I had started down this path at 30. Things originally started really going bad at about 26. That's when I started gaining, but actually, I didn't start seriously overeating until a couple of years later, when I got to law school. For those first couple of years I was furiously dieting -- super low fat, whole grains, veggies. And then I started law school, which was pretty rigorous and I didn't have time or energy for banging my head against that wall anymore and boy did things snowball. I used to buy two giant lemon poppyseed muffins and a big thing of yummy bean and escarole soup on my way to the library and it was kinda blissful. Like a drug, really. Sigh... Well, anyhow, those 13 years were not kind to my body. And I don't think the recovery is going to be quick, though the gains I have made already are huge.

Janknitz 06-27-2013 05:46 PM

Quote:

And wow, I woulda been so much better off if I had started down this path at 30. Things originally started really going bad at about 26. That's when I started gaining, but actually, I didn't start seriously overeating until a couple of years later, when I got to law school. For those first couple of years I was furiously dieting -- super low fat, whole grains, veggies. And then I started law school, which was pretty rigorous and I didn't have time or energy for banging my head against that wall anymore and boy did things snowball.
I had the opposite. I'd just started low carbing when I got into law school, and the discipline needed to survive (working two jobs during the day and attending classes at night with one young child and a pregnancy in the middle :eek:) kept me on the straight and narrow path through the bar exam. I lost 40 lbs before getting pregnant and kept if off until the bar exam. THEN all hell broke loose and I gained it all back and more.

If only I'd stuck with it because I did so great before (that's how I got pregnant, because I got my PCOS under control). I would not be struggling as I am now. Coulda, shoulda, woulda. :(

dawnyama 06-27-2013 05:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rubidoux (Post 16490350)
That eight year thing is interesting. I like the idea of continuing improvement. :) I may have to go look for Life Without Bread.

My library has a copy! Check there first. I got it out 2 times, and then I decided I had to have the book myself. It is one of my favorites!!! I got it when my daughter was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes 2 years ago.

rubidoux 06-27-2013 06:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Janknitz (Post 16490368)
I had the opposite. I'd just started low carbing when I got into law school, and the discipline needed to survive (working two jobs during the day and attending classes at night with one young child and a pregnancy in the middle :eek:) kept me on the straight and narrow path through the bar exam. I lost 40 lbs before getting pregnant and kept if off until the bar exam. THEN all hell broke loose and I gained it all back and more.

If only I'd stuck with it because I did so great before (that's how I got pregnant, because I got my PCOS under control). I would not be struggling as I am now. Coulda, shoulda, woulda. :(

So funny how we have so much in common but all mixed up. I discovered low carb right after law school, like maybe six months later, and I kinda had the same experience then that you had in law school (minus the children!) where I had a crazy hectic stressful job (death penalty defense in a deep south state) and felt like low carb was a life raft through that job and then also through my first pregnancy, which was right after the fellowship ended. (Low carb is SO awesome for a type I pregnancy.) I didn't lose any weight back then, though, and actually continued to gain dribs and drabs while low carbing. It wasn't until about two years ago (that child is now almost 10!) that I figured out how to actually lose some weight.

If you have any advice for how to pass a bar exam with children, lmk! I took the cali bar last summer and failed miserably (but I knew I hadn't studied anywhere near enough) and I'm taking it again in July and I don't think there's any chance of passing. I have only been through about half of the subjects and only 4 weeks to go, and not a lot of help w childcare. Gah. So screwed! I NEED to pass in february, though. I don't want to spend a decade of my life studying for this stupid test!

eta: Do you knit? I think a big part of my problem with the bar is that knitting is so much more appealing than studying. lol But truthfully, I don't get a lot of time for that either.

DiamondDeb 06-27-2013 08:28 PM

Thanks for mentioning this! I had not seen the video. It really makes you think. and it does make sense.

I need to visit PA's blog more often. I do tend to park there and stay for days when I visit. So much good info!

clackley 06-28-2013 05:57 AM

I highly recommend the book. He talks about a number of health improvements in his patients through low carb diet. One disease he talks about taking up to 8 yrs. to cure is colitis. Patients would have flares, albeit much less frequency and severity but none the less, up to 8 yrs. to be free of them and the disease.

rubidoux 06-28-2013 10:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by clackley (Post 16490870)
I highly recommend the book. He talks about a number of health improvements in his patients through low carb diet. One disease he talks about taking up to 8 yrs. to cure is colitis. Patients would have flares, albeit much less frequency and severity but none the less, up to 8 yrs. to be free of them and the disease.

I'm gonna order a copy today. It only comes in a paper version!


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