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SadieJack 05-17-2013 07:22 AM

How can I make it stick?
 
I have gone on and off the LC wagon so much that I can't think straight. :stars:

I get discouraged very quickly and say to myself "do something else". Then I try all other kinds of diets and fail at those as well.

Rinse, repeat

Help? :dunno:

Patience 05-17-2013 07:31 AM

Does something convince you that LC is the WOE for you?
If so, what is it?
From there you need to analyze what you will do differently this time when you get discouraged(most of us face it!). You need a plan and strategies.
You've got to really want it and that means get in the game for an extended period of time.
Good luck?

Ntombi 05-17-2013 07:44 AM

Maybe you're not ready to change the way you eat yet. If you're not sticking to any diet or healthy way of eating, it might be time to figure out why. Or just give yourself a break from diets and take the time to look at your attitude toward food and your body. I know some people have made good book recommendations here and elsewhere, if that appeals to you, talk to someone you trust, or maybe a few sessions with a counselor could help.

I know it sounds weird, but I refused to diet until I knew I was truly ready to change the way I eat. I figured it was better to stay at my high weight than to yoyo to an even higher weight by dieting and falling off the wagon multiple times. Though I have been significantly overweight since I was young, I didn't diet formally until I was in my late twenties. The first time I did, I was ready, so I stuck to it and lost over 80 pounds, until I got extremely sick, lost my job and my savings, and my life basically did a 180. It took several years to get back to some stability, though in a very different format than before. Since then, I have dabbled, but knew I wasn't truly ready to recommit until this year. I restarted, and have been on plan since. I wasn't ready again until now, and I didn't want to keep beating myself up and making things worse and worse.

My approach may not work for you, but I thought I'd share. Too many people I know are on a perpetual diet, but really it doesn't mean anything other than a restart every couple of weeks, coupled with tons of guilt and self-flagellation. That's not healthy.

However you decide to proceed, good luck. :)

nera 05-17-2013 08:00 AM

I dieted on and off for 17 years until I was just sick of myself and my health was suffering. I finally decided I needed something where I could eat some good stuff and larger quantities. I just needed to sit and pig out sometimes so then this was good because I won't gain from eating a while bag of BBQ pork rinds. So this worked for me.

Time to ask yourself the hard questions like what do you need most from a way of life to help you stick? Which foods are most important to you?

Once I decided to not cheat for the 2 week induction and saw the 11 pound loss I was hooked. Find your path girl you will do it in your own time and way.

I lost over 100 pounds and it was so worth it!! Love this WOE and I am now working on the slow creep but I know I can do it cause if I work it - it works every time. Every time! Whoohoo!

llisarray 05-17-2013 08:11 AM

I lost 80 pounds on Lc a few years back. I let most all of it creep back up on me. I kept the weight on consciously because I was happy and healthy, even overweight....I know some will say not healthy, but I had no apparent health problems. I CHOSE to stay large...some friends and my hubs and I decided to travel to Texas on our motorcycles and that is what made me decide to get back on lc...what I'm trying to say in a round about way is that you have to make up your mind that losing weight is what you want to do...I do, anyway. My woe is more a mind thing than anything else.

avid 05-17-2013 08:23 AM

I think anyone who says they are on a diet is setting themselves up to fail.
dieting, is depriving yourself of something desirable for a period of time. When that time ends it is then ok to indulge once again. The result is inevitable. And that assumes that you were able to deprive yourself long enough to reach your goal, which we all know rarely happens in the first place.
If however you make a lifestyle change for health and well being, then you are not depriving yourself of anything desirable and there is no end.
It has worked for me so far. I no longer view a gooey piece of cake as something I desire. I see it as a pretty poison.
Feeling fit and being proud to look into the mirror are huge rewards for me.
No pasta dish or sugary confection will ever give me such satisfaction.

cfine 05-17-2013 08:34 AM

Well said, Avid and Ntombi.

SadieJack 05-17-2013 09:00 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bella (Post 16428436)
Does something convince you that LC is the WOE for you?
If so, what is it?
From there you need to analyze what you will do differently this time when you get discouraged(most of us face it!). You need a plan and strategies.
You've got to really want it and that means get in the game for an extended period of time.
Good luck?

Thank you. I like LC because the food choices satisfy me (eggs, cheese, meat (love steaks))... I lost weight back in 2003 when everything was about LC. remember that? I remember seeing Lipton LC Iced Tea (WTH?) Anyway... since then "life" has happened and for whatever reason, I could not sustain the LC way. So I essentially dieted myself to 250 lbs!

SadieJack 05-17-2013 09:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ntombi (Post 16428468)
Maybe you're not ready to change the way you eat yet. If you're not sticking to any diet or healthy way of eating, it might be time to figure out why. Or just give yourself a break from diets and take the time to look at your attitude toward food and your body. I know some people have made good book recommendations here and elsewhere, if that appeals to you, talk to someone you trust, or maybe a few sessions with a counselor could help.

Excellent point! Obviously there is some mental block that is precluding me from sticking to any plan. I self-sabotage. And I have tried in the past to ditch the diet and eat whatever while trying to figure out my blockages. But, the guilt sets in after awhile and I say to myself "get back on a diet".

What books would you or others suggest?? I am a reader so that would be helpful.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ntombi (Post 16428468)
I know it sounds weird, but I refused to diet until I knew I was truly ready to change the way I eat. I figured it was better to stay at my high weight than to yoyo to an even higher weight by dieting and falling off the wagon multiple times. Though I have been significantly overweight since I was young, I didn't diet formally until I was in my late twenties. The first time I did, I was ready, so I stuck to it and lost over 80 pounds, until I got extremely sick, lost my job and my savings, and my life basically did a 180. It took several years to get back to some stability, though in a very different format than before. Since then, I have dabbled, but knew I wasn't truly ready to recommit until this year. I restarted, and have been on plan since. I wasn't ready again until now, and I didn't want to keep beating myself up and making things worse and worse.

How did you know when you were "ready"? That is my problem... I think I am "ready" and then I blow it. What you say makes a lot of sense. I have been going through extremely tough years (bankruptcy, loss of friends and mother and grandmother, loss of income, etc.) Am I asking for failure by trying to make a health change right now?


Quote:

Originally Posted by Ntombi (Post 16428468)
My approach may not work for you, but I thought I'd share. Too many people I know are on a perpetual diet, but really it doesn't mean anything other than a restart every couple of weeks, coupled with tons of guilt and self-flagellation. That's not healthy.

However you decide to proceed, good luck. :)

Thank you and you are right about the self-flagellation. I have a raw back :)

SadieJack 05-17-2013 09:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nera (Post 16428485)
I dieted on and off for 17 years until I was just sick of myself and my health was suffering. I finally decided I needed something where I could eat some good stuff and larger quantities. I just needed to sit and pig out sometimes so then this was good because I won't gain from eating a while bag of BBQ pork rinds. So this worked for me.

Time to ask yourself the hard questions like what do you need most from a way of life to help you stick? Which foods are most important to you?

Once I decided to not cheat for the 2 week induction and saw the 11 pound loss I was hooked. Find your path girl you will do it in your own time and way.

I lost over 100 pounds and it was so worth it!! Love this WOE and I am now working on the slow creep but I know I can do it cause if I work it - it works every time. Every time! Whoohoo!

Congrats on the weight loss!! :jumpjoy:

You make a good point in that I also need to sit down and "pig out" at times as well. And I know you can do that on LC more than other diets. I did everything right in the 80 and 90s - low fat, low cal and I kept gaining, so when I did LC in 2003 and ate mayo, burgers and bacon and lost weight I said WHOOO-hooo! But, for some reason I did not stay with it.

momov2boys 05-17-2013 09:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by avid (Post 16428518)
I think anyone who says they are on a diet is setting themselves up to fail...

If however you make a lifestyle change for health and well being, then you are not depriving yourself of anything desirable and there is no end.
It has worked for me so far. I no longer view a gooey piece of cake as something I desire. I see it as a pretty poison.
Feeling fit and being proud to look into the mirror are huge rewards for me.
No pasta dish or sugary confection will ever give me such satisfaction.

:goodpost:

SadieJack 05-17-2013 09:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by llisarray (Post 16428500)
I lost 80 pounds on Lc a few years back. I let most all of it creep back up on me. I kept the weight on consciously because I was happy and healthy, even overweight....I know some will say not healthy, but I had no apparent health problems. I CHOSE to stay large...some friends and my hubs and I decided to travel to Texas on our motorcycles and that is what made me decide to get back on lc...what I'm trying to say in a round about way is that you have to make up your mind that losing weight is what you want to do...I do, anyway. My woe is more a mind thing than anything else.

Have fun on your trip! I can't abide being fat myself. I don't feel good most of the time and I hate the clothes I am forced to wear. I admire you for being "happy in your own skin". I never have had that feeling.

SadieJack 05-17-2013 09:33 AM

[QUOTE=avid;16428518]I think anyone who says they are on a diet is setting themselves up to fail.[\quote]

You are so right... I know that I am doing this but I do it anyway (set myself up for failure).... how sick is that? :sad:

Ntombi 05-17-2013 09:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SadieJack (Post 16428635)
Excellent point! Obviously there is some mental block that is precluding me from sticking to any plan. I self-sabotage. And I have tried in the past to ditch the diet and eat whatever while trying to figure out my blockages. But, the guilt sets in after awhile and I say to myself "get back on a diet".

What books would you or others suggest?? I am a reader so that would be helpful.



How did you know when you were "ready"? That is my problem... I think I am "ready" and then I blow it. What you say makes a lot of sense. I have been going through extremely tough years (bankruptcy, loss of friends and mother and grandmother, loss of income, etc.) Am I asking for failure by trying to make a health change right now?




Thank you and you are right about the self-flagellation. I have a raw back :)

Okay, time to give yourself a break!

I can't help with the books, because, though I'm a voracious reader, I haven't read any of the books I'm talking about. :laugh: If you start a new thread, asking for book recommendations to help get you in a good mind frame to change your approach to eating and dieting, you'll get lots of replies. I'll try to remember what books I've seen mentioned here before and I'll pop back in if I do.

As to when I was ready. Hmm. The first time, my best friend was getting married, and I really didn't want to be the fat fat maid of honor. That, coupled with just being sick of the status quo was enough to keep me on the straight and narrow until the success of losing got me hooked.

This time? I'm almost forty with multiple health issues. None of them are lifestyle related or preventable, but it finally sunk all the way in that I could add type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, and other fully preventable problems to my already full plate, and if I did, I would be so freaking pissed at myself! That, added to the fact that I was just sick of being this size, meant that I knew I was ready to commit to this for life. I just felt that click. I was done.

Anjikun 05-17-2013 10:03 AM

In terms of book recommendations, I recently read Why We Get Fat and What to Do About It, by Gary Taubes. Like you, I have been off and on low-carb, switching it up when it wasn't working that well or when I got tired of it.

To me, knowing the science/biological mechanisms behind something is extremely important, and health/longevity is my number one priority. The arguments in WWGF are very convincing to me, especially because Taubes is not peddling a specific plan.

After reading this book my attitude has changed quite a lot. Now I am convinced that low-carb (though not drastically low) is the healthiest WOE for me, and I am also convinced that eating this way over the long-term will get me to the healthiest weight that I can achieve.

nolcjunk 05-17-2013 10:48 AM

I am on a diet, the Atkins diet, on the lifetime maintenance rung.

For me it doesn't matter what I call it, what matters is what I do and how much work I am willing to put into it. People fall off diets and they falls off WOEs as well.

I got to a point where I was sick and tired of being fat and how it affected every single aspect of my life and how I spent every other minute thinking about this and how unhappy it was making me. And, I just decided to stop. I didn't want food to be reason that I was missing out on so many things. Just compare the amount of time you eat and get pleasure from it vs the amount of time you live in your body and with the consequences of poor eating and no exercise. I hated getting winded and having to plan things out to accommodate my fatness- like if I had to walk a mile somewhere I would plan it so I could arrive early and have a breather and relax and mop up my sweat before I had to meet someone.

This is blunt but it works- make a list of your priorities in life- what do you want to accomplish, who do you want to spend time with, what kinds of things do you want to do and see, what is important to you? Are eat more cake, binge on a pizza, or have other junk food on there? If not, then you have to stop making them a priority in life and focus on your real goals.

LoriAS 05-17-2013 11:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nolcjunk (Post 16428769)
I am on a diet, the Atkins diet, on the lifetime maintenance rung.

For me it doesn't matter what I call it, what matters is what I do and how much work I am willing to put into it. People fall off diets and they falls off WOEs as well.

I got to a point where I was sick and tired of being fat and how it affected every single aspect of my life and how I spent every other minute thinking about this and how unhappy it was making me. And, I just decided to stop. I didn't want food to be reason that I was missing out on so many things. Just compare the amount of time you eat and get pleasure from it vs the amount of time you live in your body and with the consequences of poor eating and no exercise. I hated getting winded and having to plan things out to accommodate my fatness- like if I had to walk a mile somewhere I would plan it so I could arrive early and have a breather and relax and mop up my sweat before I had to meet someone.

This is blunt but it works- make a list of your priorities in life- what do you want to accomplish, who do you want to spend time with, what kinds of things do you want to do and see, what is important to you? Are eat more cake, binge on a pizza, or have other junk food on there? If not, then you have to stop making them a priority in life and focus on your real goals.

:goodpost:

peanutte 05-17-2013 11:16 AM

Quote:

I think anyone who says they are on a diet is setting themselves up to fail.
dieting, is depriving yourself of something desirable for a period of time. When that time ends it is then ok to indulge once again. The result is inevitable. And that assumes that you were able to deprive yourself long enough to reach your goal, which we all know rarely happens in the first place.
From a personal standpoint, I strongly disagree.

I have no problem saying I am on a diet, because I am. This means I chose to eat in a manner which would cause weight loss, and now I eat in a manner to protect my weight loss. The way I eat is a means to an end. I had plenty of different choices that might or might not have worked as well as Atkins, but choosing Atkins has proved to be healthy and sustainable for me, and I did what I set out to do--though not without sacrifices, concessions and in a sense, "deprivation". The deprivation isn't, for me, a negative thing, unless I would view it as something to rebel against and resent, which I don't, or if I viewed it as something forced upon me, which it isn't.

For me it's more like: I don't have cable TV or a cell phone, and I don't feel deprived, even though most people have those things and cannot imagine how I don't see this as a huge thing I'm missing out on. I don't want to spend the money and they aren't important to me, therefore I don't have them. You don't miss what you don't want.

I have seen many well-intended and sincere declarations that this is a lifestyle or a way of eating and therefore it can't be gone off of, because it's not a diet, and then people go off it anyway.

My point is just that it's a word--diet. It means different things to different people, and that's fine. I like calling a spade a spade and saying yes, I am still on a diet, because I really don't care for the rampant anti-diet bias that has snowballed over the past, I don't know, decade or two. Like it's a dirty word to say "diet", and the healthy thing to do is to talk about lifestyles and moderation and being kind to ourselves, which somehow will make us lose weight as if accidentally. I don't know if anyone else has noticed how common it is these days for someone to rush to say, "Oh but I wasn't really trying to lose weight. I was doing XYZ for my health." It's like you're not supposed to say what's really required and what you did to lose weight. Maybe this is more of a societal pressure among women; I don't know.

peanutte 05-17-2013 11:23 AM

Quote:

This is blunt but it works- make a list of your priorities in life- what do you want to accomplish, who do you want to spend time with, what kinds of things do you want to do and see, what is important to you? Are eat more cake, binge on a pizza, or have other junk food on there? If not, then you have to stop making them a priority in life and focus on your real goals.
This is really, really true. If we made a list of our top five values and priorities in life, I don't think some of what we actually do, and what actually takes up our time and energy, would appear on that list. This is a super easy exercise to do and it's very humbling and eye-opening.

Mistizoom 05-17-2013 11:28 AM

Book recommendation: Heath at Every Size: The Surprising Truth About Your Weight by Linda Bacon. It is not a book about staying fat. It is about using intutive eating type techniques and exercise to improve your health (and your weight, possibly).

I, too, dieted up to a high weight. Then I stopped dieting, because I didn't want to get fatter. I made peace with being very fat. A mental switch flipped when DH was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. I realized it is about health. So I am committed to eating LC for life, regardless of weight, as it is the healthiest way for me to eat (I have PCOS and insulin resistance). It is defintely a mental thing. So work on getting there mentally first, then implement the dietary changes that you think will work for you long term.

Rhubarb 05-17-2013 11:47 AM

I've read a boatload of diet books going all the way back to the 80s, but the one that blew my mind and made me look at eating in a whole new way was "Why We Get Fat" by Taubes, mentioned above. I knew a lot about the psychology of dieting but I was woefully uninformed (misinformed, actually) about the latest scientific knowledge about the bio-chemistry of food and its relationship to the human body.

mainemom 05-17-2013 01:58 PM

Absolutely "Why We Get Fat." It changed my life forever.

SadieJack 05-17-2013 02:55 PM

This is too ironic!!! Just after posting today I felt this strange pressure in my chest, like someone was grabbing my heart and squeezing. I got very scared and went in to see my doctor right away. He did an EKG and other tests and all is good. It turned out to be a chest muscle spasm. How weird is that?

BUT....he was asking about my lifestyle, exercise, WEIGHT. He has been my doctor for almost 20 years and has NEVER said anything about my weight because my blood pressure and everything else looked OK.

So, for the first time ever he said the magic words: "you need to lose weight".

So there is my motivation! Handed to me on a platter! I am 55 and 250 lbs. Should weigh about 140-160 (I am 5' 9")

Strange indeed that this happened today. :)

Trigger828 05-17-2013 05:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SadieJack (Post 16428635)
How did you know when you were "ready"? That is my problem... I think I am "ready" and then I blow it. What you say makes a lot of sense. I have been going through extremely tough years (bankruptcy, loss of friends and mother and grandmother, loss of income, etc.) *********Am I asking for failure by trying to make a health change right now? ********


See I think this is a good time for you because it is something YOU CAN CONTROL. I think alot of your life was out of your personal control. And you went thru hard times.

But with food, it is something you can succeed. Something you AND ONLY you control. No one can change it but you.

I think if you give yourself some good hard credit for what you are capable of and KNOW in your heart that this change is for you, by you, all about you, and your the only one controlling the situation, then I think you will move forward and continue.

best of luck. life is rough. But when there are a few situations that you can personally control, jump on those and do your best!! Your outcome will be sensational.

Sharss 05-17-2013 06:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by peanutte (Post 16428812)
From a personal standpoint, I strongly disagree.

I have no problem saying I am on a diet, because I am. This means I chose to eat in a manner which would cause weight loss, and now I eat in a manner to protect my weight loss. The way I eat is a means to an end. I had plenty of different choices that might or might not have worked as well as Atkins, but choosing Atkins has proved to be healthy and sustainable for me, and I did what I set out to do--though not without sacrifices, concessions and in a sense, "deprivation". The deprivation isn't, for me, a negative thing, unless I would view it as something to rebel against and resent, which I don't, or if I viewed it as something forced upon me, which it isn't.

For me it's more like: I don't have cable TV or a cell phone, and I don't feel deprived, even though most people have those things and cannot imagine how I don't see this as a huge thing I'm missing out on. I don't want to spend the money and they aren't important to me, therefore I don't have them. You don't miss what you don't want.

I have seen many well-intended and sincere declarations that this is a lifestyle or a way of eating and therefore it can't be gone off of, because it's not a diet, and then people go off it anyway.

My point is just that it's a word--diet. It means different things to different people, and that's fine. I like calling a spade a spade and saying yes, I am still on a diet, because I really don't care for the rampant anti-diet bias that has snowballed over the past, I don't know, decade or two. Like it's a dirty word to say "diet", and the healthy thing to do is to talk about lifestyles and moderation and being kind to ourselves, which somehow will make us lose weight as if accidentally. I don't know if anyone else has noticed how common it is these days for someone to rush to say, "Oh but I wasn't really trying to lose weight. I was doing XYZ for my health." It's like you're not supposed to say what's really required and what you did to lose weight. Maybe this is more of a societal pressure among women; I don't know.

I agree! No matter what plan we choose, if the ultimate goal is better health and eating in such a way to lose weight, then we're dieting.

In my WOE, I've been depriving myself of many things allowed that once I've met my Goal and am maintaining, I will be able to enjoy - if my maintenance weight stays the same.

JMacB 05-17-2013 06:17 PM

I'm going to pile on the recommendation for Taubes' book. I tell people the book may be called "Why We are Fat" but when I read it it felt like it should be called "Julia, This Is Why You Are Fat."

It spoke to me so clearly, that I started the next meal. And it was just a casual mention of Facebook by a friend about how she read this book, it made so much sense to her, she'd changed her way of eating ahead earlier and had lost 80 pounds. I downloaded it that night, and by morning I was eating low carb.

One of our family friends wrote her PhD dissertation on the psychology of weight loss, and the mental preparedness it takes to have a successful weight loss. I haven't spoken to her since I started but I think I want to seek her out.

nolcjunk 05-18-2013 11:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by peanutte (Post 16428812)

My point is just that it's a word--diet. It means different things to different people, and that's fine. I like calling a spade a spade and saying yes, I am still on a diet, because I really don't care for the rampant anti-diet bias that has snowballed over the past, I don't know, decade or two. Like it's a dirty word to say "diet", and the healthy thing to do is to talk about lifestyles and moderation and being kind to ourselves, which somehow will make us lose weight as if accidentally. I don't know if anyone else has noticed how common it is these days for someone to rush to say, "Oh but I wasn't really trying to lose weight. I was doing XYZ for my health." It's like you're not supposed to say what's really required and what you did to lose weight. Maybe this is more of a societal pressure among women; I don't know.

Good point. My favorite is when celebrities talk about how they don't diet and love eating ice cream and cheeseburgers. And, claim they don't exercise either. I didn't realize people just naturally had six packs. :lol:


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