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Old 04-10-2013, 11:45 AM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Janknitz View Post
I was having a lot of anxiety with low carb and found out it was simple dehydration. I'm terrible about drinking enough, and when I start to feel anxious now, I check in with myself to see if I've been taking in enough fluid.

This is not the cyclical type of anxiety I experienced with blood sugar fluctuations--it's more constant and not as severe. My heart will pound, too.

Drink up, see if it helps.
Yeah, dehydration can definitely cause symptoms like the OP describes:


Even Mild Dehydration Can Alter Mood
Most people only think about drinking water when they are thirsty; but by then it may already be too late.

Even mild dehydration can alter a person’s mood, energy level, and ability to think clearly, according to two studies recently conducted at the University of Connecticut’s Human Performance Laboratory.

The tests showed that it didn’t matter if a person had just walked for 40 minutes on a treadmill or was sitting at rest – the adverse effects from mild dehydration were the same. Mild dehydration is defined as an approximately 1.5 percent loss in normal water volume in the body.

The test results affirm the importance of staying properly hydrated at all times and not just during exercise, extreme heat, or exertion, says Lawrence E. Armstrong, one of the studies’ lead scientists and a professor of physiology in UConn’s Department of Kinesiology in the Neag School of Education.

“Our thirst sensation doesn’t really appear until we are 1 [percent] or 2 percent dehydrated. By then dehydration is already setting in and starting to impact how our mind and body perform,” says Armstrong, an international expert on hydration who has conducted research in the field for more than 20 years. “Dehydration affects all people, and staying properly hydrated is just as important for those who work all day at a computer as it is for marathon runners, who can lose up to 8 percent of their body weight as water when they compete.”

Separate groups of young women and men were tested. Twenty-five women took part in one study. Their average age was 23. The men’s group consisted of 26 men with an average age of 20. All of the participants were healthy, active individuals, who were neither high-performance athletes nor sedentary – typically exercising for 30 to 60 minutes per day.

Each participant took part in three evaluations that were separated by 28 days. All of the participants walked on a treadmill to induce dehydration, and all of the subjects were hydrated the evening before the evaluations commenced. As part of the evaluation, the subjects were put through a battery of cognitive tests that measured vigilance, concentration, reaction time, learning, memory, and reasoning. The results were compared against a separate series of tests when the individuals were not dehydrated.

In the test involving the young women, mild dehydration caused headaches, fatigue, and difficulty concentrating, according to one of the studies, which appears in the February issue of The Journal of Nutrition. The female subjects also perceived tasks as more difficult when slightly dehydrated, although there was no substantive reduction in their cognitive abilities.

In the test involving the young men, mild dehydration caused some difficulty with mental tasks, particularly in the areas of vigilance and working memory, according to the results of the second UConn study. While the young men also experienced fatigue, tension, and anxiety when mildly dehydrated, adverse changes in mood and symptoms were “substantially greater in females than in males, both at rest and during exercise,” according to the study. The men’s study was published in the British Journal of Nutrition in November 2011.

“Even mild dehydration that can occur during the course of our ordinary daily activities can degrade how we are feeling – especially for women, who appear to be more susceptible to the adverse effects of low levels of dehydration than men,” says Harris Lieberman, one of the studies’ co-authors and a research psychologist with the Military Nutrition Division, U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine in Natick, Mass. “In both sexes these adverse mood changes may limit the motivation required to engage in even moderate aerobic exercise. Mild dehydration may also interfere with other daily activities, even when there is no physical demand component present.”

Why women and men are so adversely affected by mild dehydration is unclear, and more research is necessary. But other research has shown that neurons in the brain detect dehydration and may signal other parts of the brain regulating mood when dehydration occurs. This process could be part of an ancient warning system protecting humans from more dire consequences, and alerting them to the need for water to survive.

In order to stay properly hydrated, experts like Armstrong recommend that individuals drink eight, 8-ounce glasses of water a day, which is approximately equivalent to about 2 liters of water. People can check their hydration status by monitoring the color of their urine. Urine should be a very pale yellow in individuals who are properly hydrated. Urine that is dark yellow or tan in color indicates greater dehydration. Proper hydration is particularly important for high-risk groups, such as the elderly, people with diabetes, and children.

The dehydration studies were supported by Danone Research of France and were conducted in partnership with the U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, University of Arkansas, and Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital’s Institute for Exercise and Environmental Medicine in Dallas, Texas. UConn professor Douglas Casa, adjunct assistant professor Elaine Lee, and members of the graduate student team at UConn’s Korey Stringer Institute for the prevention of sudden death in sport helped gather data for the two studies.
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Old 04-10-2013, 08:49 PM   #32
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You might want to take a look at the Perfect Health Diet by Paul Jaminet. It is similar to the Potatoes Not Prozac concept, but unlike PNP, Jaminet recommends avoiding all grains and legumes while consuming certain "safe starches" each day. Some people eating by his recommendations have reported decrease in anxiety they found occured when eating strict LC. Here's this month's thread for it under "Other Plans" Perfect Health Diet - April. Original thread: Perfect Health Diet.

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Old 04-11-2013, 02:58 AM   #33
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Thank You

Thanks again for all the advice and suggestions you guys. I am a bit familiar with Paul Jaminet's work and I have heard of the idea of using starches to raise seratonin levels.

I will take a closer look at Jaminet's work, but I'm hoping to not have to go higher on the carbs.

I am crossing my fingers that two months of strict vlc will balance everything out.

I also am aware that alcohol has often sabotaged my efforts.. sometimes days into the diet and at other times a couple weeks, I'd have a particular day where I felt anxious and would end up having a drink to help smooth it out.. and I don't mean just one drink or two or three - not infrequently I'd end up putting away half a 1.5 liter of Bacardi mixing it with diet coke.

I am aware that alcohol puts ketosis on hold and pretty much weight loss on hold in general and probably promotes fat storage, especially if food is consumed simultaneously with drink.

This time with my new start tomorrow, I am resolved to keep completely clear of alcohol for the first 6 weeks and then limit to 1-2 drinks thereafter.. so, here goes nothing
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Old 04-11-2013, 05:06 AM   #34
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I've found that use of alcohol to deal with anxiety is a quick fix, but one that increases my anxiety within a few hours and in the longer term. I always feel less anxious after a few weeks of no alcohol. It's a siren call for me to have moderate drinking as a goal. Works for some, not for others. There's a no drinking thread in the Addictions forum. You are very welcome to join us. There is one thread where folks are trying to moderate, and another where folks are committed to not drinking for a good while. You could join one or both . . . the no drinking thread was set up because discussion of moderate drinking on the other thread is a trigger for some.

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Old 04-11-2013, 06:01 AM   #35
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No Drinking

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bella View Post
I've found that use of alcohol to deal with anxiety is a quick fix, but one that increases my anxiety within a few hours and in the longer term. I always feel less anxious after a few weeks of no alcohol. It's a siren call for me to have moderate drinking as a goal. Works for some, not for others. There's a no drinking thread in the Addictions forum. You are very welcome to join us. There is one thread where folks are trying to moderate, and another where folks are committed to not drinking for a good while. You could join one or both . . . the no drinking thread was set up because discussion of moderate drinking on the other thread is a trigger for some.
Thanks a bunch for letting me know. I think I'll join that thread.
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Old 04-11-2013, 08:08 AM   #36
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I sometimes supplement my homemade broth with purchased broth as the added liquid. Its very rich, and I can always dilute with extra water should I want to. I always buy low salt broth, figuring I can add salt if necessary. Be very careful about purchasing broths, so many have added sugar.

I make bone broth, and when I take it for lunch I add a spoonful of miso (fermented soy paste), a splash of vinegar and some hot sauce. The miso gives it a nice saltiness, and some great probiotics.

YUM!
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Old 04-11-2013, 08:50 AM   #37
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Alcohol--like carbohydrates--depletes B vitamins, which are necessary for a healthy nervous system.
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Old 04-11-2013, 08:51 AM   #38
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I have this same type of anxiety and I after much research, I think I have an issue with serotonin. I think the carbs/sugar helps me produce more serotonin so my brain "craves" them so to speak when there are none. I feel like I might have BDD (body dysmorphic disorder) though....I'm not sure what is going on, but it feels out of control. They anxiety has been overwhelming lately (and I've been dieting/exercising a lot). Too many rules imposed on myself...too much guilt if I don't work out or I eat too much... Ugh...it's not cool.

I was reading that vitamin D supplementation, getting out in the sun (or light therapy as they did in the study), meditation (look up transcendental meditation - easy and effective), good sleeping habits, and exercise are ways to improve serotonin production in the brian without drugs.

Right now, I have only been able to supplement and exercise. I'm working on sleep and meditation next. I also should go sit in the sun at lunch... Anyway, I do notice a drop in anxiety after a workout, so that is positive. However, most of my food anxiety come during the day time (work) hours, so I'm still working on how to deal with it. Perhaps the sun thing might do the trick...
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Old 04-11-2013, 09:06 AM   #39
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To the OP: You describe my experience with ketosis...exactly. It's not a pleasant experience and I can't sleep at all. I've stuck it out for 3 weeks at a time before I give up. The last time I was in ketosis I started hallucinating from lack of sleep. I tried every sleep medication I could get my hands on, including Rx.

The comment about eating a potato at bedtime was interesting. I love the appetite suppression that ketosis gives me but I just can't put up with the anxious, wired feeling. It's like an ongoing panic attack.

I'm going to look into Paul Jaminet's plan. Thanks for starting this thread-- Glad to know I'm not the only one who struggles with ketosis....
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Old 04-11-2013, 09:45 AM   #40
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Originally Posted by synger View Post
I make bone broth, and when I take it for lunch I add a spoonful of miso (fermented soy paste), a splash of vinegar and some hot sauce. The miso gives it a nice saltiness, and some great probiotics.

YUM!
I've got some miso languishing in the back of my fridge, gonna give this a go.
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Old 04-11-2013, 09:50 AM   #41
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DD80, sun and vitamin D sound are recommended for depression.
Can't see how they could do any harm when it comes to anxiety.
I am a fan of 5HTP. I don't take it daily, and rarely more than 50mg at a time, but it does seem to take the edge off. It may be totally placebo, but it does seem to work for me. It's subtle, I don't feel anything kicking in. It's a precursor to seratonin, so I figure it is doing something positive for me.

p.s. I take it only when I am alcohol free. It can cause drowsiness so I usually take midafternoon or earlier. I also find that if I take it everyday after 3 or 4 days I become very slow so I tend to use it stingily . . . save $$ that way, too.

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Old 04-11-2013, 12:36 PM   #42
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I get this on Keto if I am not taking magnesium. When I take a mag. supplement, I am fine.
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