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SadieJack 03-24-2013 08:03 AM

President Taft
 
This is an old interview with President Taft just after he left office in 1913. He weighed 340 lbs and lost 69.2 lbs. Note the way he lost weight. LC!


http://www.lowcarbfriends.com/bbs/me...e5800-taft.jpg

jazills 03-24-2013 08:07 AM

Interesting :) Go President Taft !!!

reddarin 03-24-2013 09:47 AM

Wow. For 1910 it looks like a pretty strict LC plan to me. Fresh veggies from all over the world weren't available year round back then and *all* meat was much fattier back then too. You can bet that he wasn't eating baked boneless skinless chicken breast. There was no such thing as margarine so you ate high fat butter. No 2% milk either, it was all high fat and fresh. I can't imagine how good the cream was back then.

Excluding the fattiest meats and the fattiest fish looks more like a modest attempt at calorie restriction.

And he kept the weight off for 17 years till his death at age 72 while active as Chief Justice of the Supreme Court! I think life expectancy at that time was 57. Dang. Way to go Mr. President!

jenericstewart 03-24-2013 05:35 PM

My husband's family is related to President Taft, so I especially found it interesting. My husband didn't inherit the fat genes, though. lol

synger 03-24-2013 08:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by reddarin (Post 16333482)

And he kept the weight off for 17 years till his death at age 72 while active as Chief Justice of the Supreme Court! I think life expectancy at that time was 57. Dang. Way to go Mr. President!

Keep in mind that "life expectancy" includes all the children who died in childhood, and child mortality was pretty high compared to our time... people who survived the first 10 years old could often live to see their 60s.

Life Expectancy by Age, 1850–2004 | Infoplease.com

heidihoopi 03-24-2013 08:21 PM

Sounds like low carb and low fat.

CarolynF 03-24-2013 08:34 PM

My grandfather went to his Inauguration ?..I have the picture here somewhere..

Anyway, was this the time of Banting???

It sounds like he did South Beach...LOL

tymom 03-24-2013 08:57 PM

"like"

reddarin 03-24-2013 09:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by synger (Post 16334371)
Keep in mind that "life expectancy" includes all the children who died in childhood, and child mortality was pretty high compared to our time... people who survived the first 10 years old could often live to see their 60s.

Interesting. You are right and I'm glad you mentioned it because I found this article where a guy did the math for his grandfather using actual mortality rates and came up with 55 years for someone born in the year 1900. Taft was born in 1857. It looks like he really did have a much longer life than could have been expected. Assuming that this person's math is correct about 1900. :)

What Does Life Expectancy Represent? | Sorry To Confuse You (With The Truth!)

Quote:

In the end, I couldn’t find the numbers I was looking for, so I calculated them myself. To estimate the actual average lifetime for someone born in 1900 you can incrementally use all the life tables produced over the last hundred years because those life tables are calculated based on actual death rates for that year. For example, if you managed to survive to the age of 40, then the life tables from 1940 for someone aged 40 will tell you what the chances were of living to the age of 41. The biggest limitation to this approach is we can’t control for things like immigration and migration. Oh well, c’est la vie.

From my calculations, the average lifetime for someone born in 1900 was actually something like 55 years, rather than the original life expectancy of 49.2. Notice that over time, average lifetime seems to consistently be about 10 years longer than life expectancy.

SadieJack 03-25-2013 08:03 AM

I did more reading on Taft and he had a number of physical ailments, including off the chart blood pressure! His systolic was over 200. When he lost the 70 lbs. his BP got much lower (although still was high by today's standards). I am truly amazed he lived to 72! Never too late to take care of your health, right?

natural_born_texan 03-25-2013 08:41 AM

Interesting article, thanks for the post!


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