Low Carb Friends  
Netrition.com - Tools - Reviews - Faces - Recipes - Home


Go Back   Low Carb Friends > Main Lowcarb Lobby
Register FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 03-05-2013, 03:48 AM   #1
Senior LCF Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Canada
Posts: 914
Gallery: Punkin
Stats: 160/95/100
WOE: NK or LC
Anyone worry about their kids?

The LC diet works for me and based on everything I read, it will probably be a long term way of life, my genetics seem to dictate that that will be my WOE. My father developed type II diabetes when he was in his 50s and my sister and I were very overweight as children. On my husband's side seems to run metabolic syndrome as everyone in his family is obese, and he himself is overweight. Now my husband doesn't really believe in LC. He likes his potatos, rice, chips, beer, chocolate and such. He doesn't like deserts so at least we are primarily a sugar free house, but here is where I start to worry. We aren't exactly a LC household. We have lots of carby foods such as bread, chips, pasta, crackers, rice, fruit etc. Things I have to seriously avoid and we have a 3 1/2 year old, who seems to like carby foods as well. She always asks for snacks like crackers, chips, fruit, juice, bread etc. I of course, give it to her but under great duress, knowing how sensitive to carbs I am (was).

I tell myself that I don't need to worry because she is still growing and the carbs probably won't affect her the way it affects me, but her genetics don't exactly point to carbs as probably a good option for her with respect to nutrition.

Does anyone else have this issue or worry about their kids. It really bothers me, but I don't really know what to do about it, I can't really tell a 3 year old she can't have toast or cereal for breakfast.
Punkin is offline   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old 03-05-2013, 03:53 AM   #2
Senior LCF Member
 
Stardust's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 261
Gallery: Stardust
I don't overly limit my kids carbs. They do have bread and pasta etc. I just try and give them some sensible (in my view) options too. My eldest loves fridge raiders, which are little chicken bites. It says they are 100% chicken but think they have something else added too as they are 4g of carbs per bag, but they are still a lot lower and more satisfying than a bag of crisps.

I also give them little ham roll ups as snacks too and peperami sticks.

So although I don't really limit their carbs, I just try and help them see they aren't the only option.
__________________
~Bright & Sparkly Blessings~
Jackie
Stardust is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2013, 04:13 AM   #3
Major LCF Poster!
 
LiterateGriffin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Jacksonville, FL
Posts: 1,762
Gallery: LiterateGriffin
Stats: 236.5 start (Jan 2012) /199.7/150 goal 5'9", 42 yr
WOE: Atkins (though I think a fairly early version)
Start Date: Jan 6 2012
Absolutely.

My son (then just turned 7) started showing signs of hypoglycemia, a year ago. Well, OK -- he'd been showing the SIGNS for years. We just only recognized if for what it was a year ago, because I was in a position to see that it was 100% related to food.

Since that moment, nuts have been our savior. I talked to his teacher and provided him with a jar of almonds at school. If he started acting up, he was to eat a 1/4 cup scoop (I provided) and see if that helped. We also trained him -- if it feels like everyone's being mean to you, or everything's going wrong, eat some nuts.

Not only did it work -- he now recognizes when he's had too many carbs and not enough fats BEFORE he gets to that stage.

We keep NUTTY snacks around, rather than carb-y ones.
__________________
I haven't found anywhere else to track this, and am not sure how accurate my scale is, but Body fat:
10/26/2012: 39.0% 10/27/2012: 39.2%
10/28/2012: 39.3% 10/30/2012: 38.5%
10/31/2012: 38.6% 11/02/2012: 36.5%
11/03/2012: 39.1% 11/04/2012: 39.3%
11/05/2012: 39.3% 11/07/2012: 38.5%
11/10/2012: 38.9%
LiterateGriffin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2013, 05:19 AM   #4
Major LCF Poster!
 
mamabear6's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Ky
Posts: 1,582
Gallery: mamabear6
Stats: 145/140/120 (previously 175/115)
WOE: LC/VLC
Start Date: Forever ago and still going
LG, ohmigosh I'm going to try that with my daughter. The way you describe your son sounds a lot like my Dani. She just turned 7 and can be quite the little dramatic girlie sometimes, for apparently no reason! The littlest things you say can sometimes send her into a little tizzy fit. Especially when she gets home from school and it's snack time. Perhaps she could keep some nuts in her backpack to eat on the bus ride home (it's a long ride). I hadn't thought of this. Again, many thanks!!!!!!!

To the OP: I worry too. Luckily I started "doing Atkins" when my daughter was born, so she's been raised a certain way and understands what foods are healthy to a decent extent. I don't keep carbs away from her, but try and provide healthier options for her. We don't keep chips, crackers, etc in the house, those are a once-in-a-great-while thing. Of course she'd like to have them, but she knows it's healthier and makes her feel better to eat an apple with peanut butter or a cheese stick for a snack. I think the easiest thing with young children is to just start providing healthier options for snacks. My daughter would never ever turn down some fresh cut veggies and homemade sour cream ranch dip. Even if there were a bowl of chips out next to the veggies, she'd make sure she got her fill of the veggies too! Who wouldn't - it's good snacking!
As far as bread goes, for now I buy low carb sliced bread and tortillas for her. They last forever because she might have one sandwich or something at home on the weekend when school is in session.
She has always really loved smoothies, too. I started sharing mine with her when she was very young. Don't all kids like smoothies? I'll just use some almond/coconut milk, some frozen berries (more than I'd add for myself), and add either some avocado or spinach and some flax. She always gets a big smile on her face when I make one for her. I think she feels very healthy and sophisticated drinking it because it's what mommy drinks.
Oh my though, when they get in school and start learning about nutrition, watch out. She came home the other day telling me she learned about not eating too much fat and how it gets stuck in your blood etc. etc. stuff along those lines and that too much meat and fat is bad... Oh, honey! You did really good learning what the school taught you, but from now on you listen to mommy because they're wrong!!! Now let's have a little talk about food.....
As parents our kids are so important to us, and we each have to decide what are the best choices to make in raising them. Good luck!
mamabear6 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2013, 05:35 AM   #5
Senior LCF Member
 
muncheechee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: NC
Posts: 477
Gallery: muncheechee
Stats: 261/235/145 (5'6")
WOE: JUDDD
Start Date: 8/14/14
Of course you can tell a 3 yr old what she can and can't have for breakfast. It's your responsibility to teach her good nutrition in spite of whatever junk food surrounds her at home and, later, out in the world. How else will our children learn better habits than we did growing up, ya know? My son is 2 and both myself and my husband are t2 diabetics so it's almost a foregone conclusion that our son will face diabetes too if he doesn't mind his nutrition... and I certainly don't want him to experience the pain of growing up as the fat kid like I did. I do limit his consumption of non-nutritious carbs like goldfish crackers but he eats plenty fruit and occasionally has oatmeal. I do worry that he consumes splenda sweetened stuff too often since he does live with diabetics so I've started using honey to sweeten things like yogurt for him.

It's a balancing act and it can be hard to teach our kids good habits when we didn't grow up with them and this woe is relatively new to us but after doing a lot of reading on why lc is best I feel confident that I'm doing the right thing by my son.
muncheechee is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2013, 05:37 AM   #6
Major LCF Poster!
 
Knittering's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 2,709
Gallery: Knittering
Stats: (250) 236/172/150 5'8
WOE: LC
Start Date: Restart: 2/18/13
I worry about it too, especially with my five-year-old who has autism. It's really difficult to get her to eat anything beyond her three foods (mostly carbs) but we work at it. In the last few months I've persuaded her to start eating hard-boiled eggs and grilled chicken, so: progress! But mostly she wants her carbs.

Fortunately our toddler LOVES meat, cheese, and eggs. I was eating mostly LC while I was pregnant and that probably has something to do with it. (We call her "Carnivore Baby.")
Knittering is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2013, 06:10 AM   #7
Senior LCF member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 9,602
Gallery: Leo41
Stats: 340 then/145 now
WOE: Low carb/calorie cycling
I don't have children, but I'm also an 'old' person who is extremely sensitive to carbs and grew up before anyone was aware of the issues involved.

I can see from family photos that I 'blossomed' into obesity between the ages of 5 and 6--and became the fat kid in school and struggled with my weight from that time on.

I'd advise the OP to simply monitor your daughter's development, as you teach her healthy eating habits. If her weight begins to escalate rapidly (as mine did in childhood), you might consider curbing carbs.
Leo41 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2013, 06:23 AM   #8
Chatty Cathy
 
clackley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: Ontario
Posts: 16,752
Gallery: clackley
Stats: 228.5/168/125
WOE: N.K.=vlc/hf/moderate protein & organic/pastured
Start Date: Restart Oct 18 2009
Quote:
Originally Posted by Punkin View Post
The LC diet works for me and based on everything I read, it will probably be a long term way of life, my genetics seem to dictate that that will be my WOE. My father developed type II diabetes when he was in his 50s and my sister and I were very overweight as children. On my husband's side seems to run metabolic syndrome as everyone in his family is obese, and he himself is overweight. Now my husband doesn't really believe in LC. He likes his potatos, rice, chips, beer, chocolate and such. He doesn't like deserts so at least we are primarily a sugar free house, but here is where I start to worry. We aren't exactly a LC household. We have lots of carby foods such as bread, chips, pasta, crackers, rice, fruit etc. Things I have to seriously avoid and we have a 3 1/2 year old, who seems to like carby foods as well. She always asks for snacks like crackers, chips, fruit, juice, bread etc. I of course, give it to her but under great duress, knowing how sensitive to carbs I am (was).

I tell myself that I don't need to worry because she is still growing and the carbs probably won't affect her the way it affects me, but her genetics don't exactly point to carbs as probably a good option for her with respect to nutrition.

Does anyone else have this issue or worry about their kids. It really bothers me, but I don't really know what to do about it, I can't really tell a 3 year old she can't have toast or cereal for breakfast.
You are the boss and the highlited statements appear to be abdicating your responsibilities. You know better. I regret that I didn`t know better when my children were young and now cringe at some of unwittingly poor choices I made for their dietary needs. You have a chance to do better.
clackley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2013, 07:02 AM   #9
Senior LCF Member
 
GAVIV's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 909
Gallery: GAVIV
Stats: RNY 12/26/12 234.4/148/125-130?
WOE: Trying to stay low carb as possible
I absolutely worry and there was a recent thread about getting your family on board. I have since started to work in more low-cab meals, mostly at dinner when I can cook for the kids. It's harder during the day, with school and outings. But I am slowly transitioning, and balance is better than none.
GAVIV is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2013, 07:07 AM   #10
Major LCF Poster!
 
Knittering's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 2,709
Gallery: Knittering
Stats: (250) 236/172/150 5'8
WOE: LC
Start Date: Restart: 2/18/13
Lots of great ideas in this older post: Kids CAN live low carb! Check out ideas:

My daughter really likes "cute little foods" so I bought her a kids bento box and fill the tiny compartments with foods I want her to eat -- tiny rolled omelet, sliced chicken, marinated broccoli, fresh fruit, etc. She does a lot better when she only has to eat a small amount and it's "cute."
Knittering is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2013, 07:14 AM   #11
Senior LCF Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: philadelphia
Posts: 74
Gallery: jara
WOE: low carb
Start Date: jan 04...restarted aug 11
"I can't really tell a 3 year old she can't have toast or cereal for breakfast."

as a teacher, statements like that really scare me. you can't tell your very small child what she can eat for breakfast? what do you think is going to happen when she's 13 and wants to go out with a 17yo boy or something along those lines? believe me, i see what happens to kids whose parents "can't really tell" them what to do, and it's not pretty!
jara is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2013, 07:18 AM   #12
Senior LCF Member
 
Kittee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Irwin, PA
Posts: 71
Gallery: Kittee
Stats: 206/134/110-115
WOE: Atkins first, then LCHF, now PSMF
Start Date: April 2011
YES. I have a 2 year old daughter, and she is always bugging me for a "cookie" (anything chocolate) I try to buy "healthier" things like the higher fiber cereal that is chocolate flavored and only has 5 grams of sugar, but still carby....it is better than Hershey's kisses at least and she really loves it.

Also I try to limit that stuff and when I cook some chicken or ground pork or whatever for me I share with her so she is at least part of the time eating my low carb stuff. She enjoys broccoli and green beans as long as they have butter on them...I also try to give her blue berries and other fruits that are lower in carbs. She used to love blue berries but I think she is getting tired of them...never gets tired of "cookie" though >_<

HOWEVER what she really loves the most...is salted butter. Any time I get it out to cook she HAS to have some or she goes crazy. I know butter isn't bad....but I feel like I am doing something wrong when I give her chunks of butter for a snack.

Speaking of my daughter liking strange things, she LOVES coffee...my mom gets decaf when we go out and will share the last sip with her, and she also wants my (regular) coffee at home, which I have to tell her no because of the caffeine...so weird, I didn't get a taste for coffee until I was a teenager...before that I thought it was nasty bitter crap, lol. She is trying to get my coffee as I type this >_<
Kittee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2013, 07:26 AM   #13
Senior LCF Member
 
SweetMe678's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Seattle, Wa
Posts: 243
Gallery: SweetMe678
Stats: 354/334/145 ~ June 3
WOE: Atkins/Gluten Free
Start Date: 11/30/2012
Quote:
Originally Posted by Punkin View Post
The LC diet works for me and based on everything I read, it will probably be a long term way of life, my genetics seem to dictate that that will be my WOE. My father developed type II diabetes when he was in his 50s and my sister and I were very overweight as children. On my husband's side seems to run metabolic syndrome as everyone in his family is obese, and he himself is overweight. Now my husband doesn't really believe in LC. He likes his potatos, rice, chips, beer, chocolate and such. He doesn't like deserts so at least we are primarily a sugar free house, but here is where I start to worry. We aren't exactly a LC household. We have lots of carby foods such as bread, chips, pasta, crackers, rice, fruit etc. Things I have to seriously avoid and we have a 3 1/2 year old, who seems to like carby foods as well. She always asks for snacks like crackers, chips, fruit, juice, bread etc. I of course, give it to her but under great duress, knowing how sensitive to carbs I am (was).

I tell myself that I don't need to worry because she is still growing and the carbs probably won't affect her the way it affects me, but her genetics don't exactly point to carbs as probably a good option for her with respect to nutrition.

Does anyone else have this issue or worry about their kids. It really bothers me, but I don't really know what to do about it, I can't really tell a 3 year old she can't have toast or cereal for breakfast.
I started low carb when my son was 5, but previous even to that. He was rarely allowed Juice/soda/crackers/bread for snack. Mostly because when I looked that the labels they appeared to be a lot of calories for very little nutrition. I never gave him cereal. most cereals had more sugar than a snickers bar and I would never have given my kid a snickers bar, why give him the equivalent? After Low carb, I still cooked a higher carb side dish for dinner for the kid and XH, usually brown rice/potato. Items that on the maintenance phase of Atkins would be legal within reason. I didn't tell me son what to eat at school, but I NEVER let him eat the breakfast at school when it was anything other than eggs. On the weekends I would make him oatmeal (sometimes) other times it was scrambled eggs, and occasionally eggsNtoast. where you cut a hole in the bread and fry the egg inside. Always whole grain bread with lower(not higher than 15g) per slice.
It got to the point where I couldn't have a salad to myself as he was always stealing veggies and meat from it To this day (at 17y/o) he would rather have a big glass of water than a soda. He never drinks juice. HE would rather snack on a hard-boiled egg than top ramen. All of these I consider good eating habits that I am grateful I taught him at a young age. His father and him had 'treats' outside the home. Sweets and such. But they were treats made into a special occasion by being shared on an outing with dad.

He is going to high school where his dad lives, and when he comes to visit I ask what food he wants me to get. Rarely does he ask for chips or icecream, but rather asks me to make deviled eggs, protein smoothies, and can I make some of that num num chicken (heroine chicken). We have continued the 'treat' where we pick a new restaraunt and go to dinner. Guess what, he still steals the veggies and meats from my salad, when he doesn't order his own that is.

SO please feel free to make changes to your child diet! It is a great thing to see when they are older that you did a good by them.
SweetMe678 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2013, 09:23 AM   #14
Senior LCF Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Canada
Posts: 914
Gallery: Punkin
Stats: 160/95/100
WOE: NK or LC
We have carby foods in the house because my husband doesn't really believe in LC diets. He thinks what I am doing to my health is dangerous, even though all I eat is whole foods: meat, veggies, nuts and eggs. To him treats like chocolate and cookies are meant to be. My other family members also are not into LC. My daughter gets plenty of things like goldfish crackers, cereal, toast, pizza etc. From all my family members and daycare, except me. If I want to tell people "not to give them to her," I get told that I shouldn't project my own "eating disorders" on to my child. So when I said that I can't tell a 3 year old what to eat, there's a bit more to it than that. If it were just me and her it would be a different story. She throws a fit whenever I tell her she can't have crackers when she asks for them, because in her mind its "why not? I get them from everyone else, mommy is mean." It is difficult to explain, you would have to be in my shoes to probably fully understand. I am LC now but in my circle of friends and family, I have an eating disorder and am endangering my health.

On the other hand, nuts are a great idea, I never thought of that. And meat and cheese treats, those are great, I am sure she would love those, I never thought of that. I know the school next year she is going to doesn't allow peanut butter but cheese and lunch meat is a great option
Punkin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2013, 09:31 AM   #15
Blabbermouth!!!
 
Ntombi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Boston, then OH, then NYC, now SoCal. Whew!
Posts: 38,380
Gallery: Ntombi
Stats: Restart: 360/284.4/190
WOE: Atkins for weight loss, NK for maintenance.
Start Date: Restarted: 1-3-13 Original: 8-23-02
Peanuts are not nuts, they're legumes, so they're in a different family from tree nuts. If she likes other nuts, I'm sure she'll be able to take them to school. There's also almond butter instead of peanut butter.

You've posted before about the fact that people in your life think you have an eating disorder. Now that belief is getting passed on to your daughter? I would not be happy, and would think seriously about having a sit-down come to Jesus talk with the important people in your life. Your husband may not "believe" in LC, but that doesn't make it invalid. And anyone who thinks regular access to sweets and chocolates for a three year old, no matter the rest of the diet, needs a wake up call regardless.
__________________
<-- Buddy
Ntombi: 5'6˝" 40 years old
Started Atkins 8-23-02 325+
bought scale 9-7-02: 318/259.6/180?

Diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis (and other conditions) Summer 2005 after years of misdiagnoses--> food plan went out the window!
Restarted--again--January 3, 2013.
Ntombi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2013, 09:42 AM   #16
Senior LCF Member
 
Gretalyn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Albuquerque
Posts: 852
Gallery: Gretalyn
Stats: maintenance
WOE: Nutritional Ketosis
Start Date: off and on since 2004, on to stay since March 2011
Quote:
Originally Posted by Punkin View Post
So when I said that I can't tell a 3 year old what to eat, there's a bit more to it than that. If it were just me and her it would be a different story. She throws a fit whenever I tell her she can't have crackers when she asks for them, because in her mind its "why not? I get them from everyone else, mommy is mean." It is difficult to explain, you would have to be in my shoes to probably fully understand. I am LC now but in my circle of friends and family, I have an eating disorder and am endangering my health.
I understand. When friends and family don't understand or support it's one thing, when they outright oppose, it's another. If your husband was fully on-board, that would make it easier, because the two of you are the ones who have the right to decide what your child eats, and no one else's opinion can trump that. But since he does not believe LC is healthy, that definitely complicates things. When I first started LC, my husband didn't believe it was healthy either. But since he has seen the improvements in my health, and since he's a naturally curious person who will read news articles and such, he's come around. Maybe with time, patience, and persistence your husband will too.

In the meantime, just try to make sure that your daughter gets the healthiest foods possible. You don't necessarily need to restrict the quantity of her carbs if you can assure quality. Fruits, starchy vegetables, and whole unsweetened dairy (milk and yogurt) are, in my opinion, the healthiest carby foods. Try to limit her intake of grains when and where you can. And surely no one believes that a child actually needs sugar! You have every right to tell the daycare not to feed her sugar, just as you would have every right to tell them not to feed her eggs if she had an egg allergy. Family can be harder to deal with, but the daycare workers work FOR YOU. And even though it's hard, remember that even your extended family is not responsible for raising your child, you are. Just do what you can, and as she grows older it will become easier for you to help her see the reasons behind what you do. You probably have some "rules" in your house that some of her friends don't have in their homes. Maybe you can use something like that as an example of how every family is different, but in our family we do this...

It's tough. But hang in there, because even little changes can really add up.
__________________


Greta
Gretalyn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2013, 09:52 AM   #17
Very Gabby LCF Member!!!
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 3,578
Gallery: Strawberry
At age 3, you have TOTAL control of what she has for breakfast!

Its your responsbility to have healthy foods in the house and to teach her that certain foods are healthy and certain foods are special treats.

This is your opportunity to teach her when she is young... the older she gets the less control you have and the harder it is to engrain good habits.

OF COURSE she will throw a fit... she's a kid and wants her way. Again, your job is to help teach and train her not to behave that way.

Eg she says "Wahhhhh... why cant I have the goldfish crackers when other people give them to me???"
Answer: "Because Mommy loves you and wants to give your good healthy food, and these are special treats." "Now, do you want some yogurt or some apple slices with peanut butter?"

Tell your friends and day care workers that your not giving your diet to your daughter. No one would suggest limiting her to 20 carbs a day with no fruit or dairy and only meat with limited veggies. She is not doing Atkins! And its not "projecting your eating disorder" to not give her JUNK FOOD. I would tell them they are nuts if they think its healthy to have a kid gobbing crackers and slugging down juice all day. You've got to take a stand!

Last edited by Strawberry; 03-05-2013 at 09:54 AM..
Strawberry is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2013, 10:07 AM   #18
Major LCF Poster!
 
Knittering's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 2,709
Gallery: Knittering
Stats: (250) 236/172/150 5'8
WOE: LC
Start Date: Restart: 2/18/13
Quote:
It is difficult to explain, you would have to be in my shoes to probably fully understand.
I totally get that.

I've found that I can get my kids to get more whole foods if I make them more kid-appealing. For example, I bought some tiny food cutters (about 3/4 of an inch wide) and use those to cut their cheese and fruit into fun shapes. I also have some "egg shapers" that I found on a Japanese website that molds hard-boiled eggs into stars, hearts, etc. My daughter LOVES them, even though she won't touch a normal egg. I make LC crepes and fill them with meat, fruit, etc. and those have been a big hit with our little one.

I found that telling her grandparents, etc. not to give her treats had disastrous results, so I dropped the hard line and asked them to give her things that are special but rarely given (fruit roll-ups, for example) and to limit the number of treats. Extended families are a challenge, especially non-LC ones.
__________________
Michelle
March - 12 hours | April - 7 hours
Callanetics goal for May: 10 hours
So far: 0/10
Knittering is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2013, 10:39 AM   #19
Major LCF Poster!
 
rubidoux's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: san diego
Posts: 1,466
Gallery: rubidoux
Stats: 214/130/130 (5'2")
WOE: HF/MP/LC
Start Date: restart 9/2012
I have *exactly* this problem and every time I give my four year old food I feel terrible. I can see that he's developing a full on carb/sweet habit that is not about true hunger, but dh is very opposed to getting rid of grains (which is what I think would be a great compromise and very healthy step). Just recently, though, I have decided screw it! I do the shopping and I'm not buying one more bag of pasta, etc. it's crazy bc dh eats fairly LC and is gluten free, but thinks its unnecessary to force it on the kids. I think it feels a little harder to us, too, bc our nine year old naturally eats well and in sensible portions. He will tell you he's not hungry even if you're offering a favorite treat. But my little one is just like his mama. . And he is also super picky and will only eat a handful of different foods these days.

Quote:
Originally Posted by clackley View Post
You are the boss and the highlited statements appear to be abdicating your responsibilities. You know better. I regret that I didn`t know better when my children were young and now cringe at some of unwittingly poor choices I made for their dietary needs. You have a chance to do better.
I hear what you're saying, but it is very hard when you have another parent in the equation. For one thing, I know that for me it would be very painful to be getting to eat carby crap that I love some of the time and then not at others. And I don't even feel like it would be the right thing for me to do for his metabolism. Maybe it would, but I feel much more comfortable w the idea of grain free all the time than havy handed part time food controlling while he knows there're cookies in the kitchen. I feel like it could set him up for obsessive craziness, yk?

At any rate, it is a more difficult situation than "you know what's right." There are a lot of competing interests involved.
__________________
jayne, type I diabetic and mama to two sweet boys (9/03 and 2/09)

high fat, moderate protein, very low carb
once a day feeding
rubidoux is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2013, 12:02 PM   #20
Senior LCF Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Canada
Posts: 914
Gallery: Punkin
Stats: 160/95/100
WOE: NK or LC
I have a friend who is basically doing the opposite and taking a hard line with her family, and the stress it is causing her is unbelievable. It has completely torn the family apart. Her kids fight with her when she tries to restrict their food (she is doing gluten free). And her mother in law tells her what a bad mother she is and it is a nightmare. It has gotten to the point where she can't even go over to her extended families houses, and she is in tears every night. I see this, and think is it worth it? Kids don't understand why she is trying so hard with their diet, she tries to explain it, but they don't understand. And she is really frustrated. I feel so bad for her.

I have basically just done the LC thing and hoped people see the results and improvement in my health and maybe get on board with the idea. I got my sister onto Atkins and she is only 5lbs away from goal, she like me, things LC is a miracle. So it is basically the two of us, against everyone else. She is lucky in the sense that her kids don't like HC foods. The genetics on her husband's side is much better than mine too.

I guess I will just keep trying and hopefully things will get better. Making food fun might just be the answer

Last edited by Punkin; 03-05-2013 at 12:05 PM..
Punkin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2013, 12:15 PM   #21
Very Gabby LCF Member!!!
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 3,578
Gallery: Strawberry
I came back to add...

The people wanting to give your little girl junk food are the ones that ought to be on the defensive. I would present it to them as "Im not enforcing Atkins, I dont want you feeding her JUNK FOOD"

Its cheap and easy for them to dish out handfuls of cheese crackeres to kids in daycare.... it entertains them and requires little work on their part. But its NOT GOOD for them.

I think its much different to try to enforce something like gluten free eating (because gluten is hidden in just about EVERYTHING thats processed -even salad dressings!) compared to just general healthy foods that pretty much everyone agrees are good for you (meats, veggies, eggs, fruits, cheese, nuts, yogurt = I mean, are they really going to argue that those foods are not good for a kid??). A gluten free diet is very restrictive, so I can see where kids would be upset having to follow it, if not for truly necessary medical reasons, like celiac disease. Avoiding unhealthy sugars and white flour is advocated by just about every one - the government food pyramids, pediatricians, low carbers, raw food proponents, etc!
Strawberry is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2013, 12:16 PM   #22
Major LCF Poster!
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: USA
Posts: 1,290
Gallery: FitnessWanabee
Stats: unfit/getting there/stud
WOE: Moderate everything
Start Date: Restart August 2012
I can see a problem for parents who allowed their young kids to eat junky cereals like "Lucky Charms" and suddenly take it away. That would be a problem.
FitnessWanabee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2013, 01:04 PM   #23
Way too much time on my hands!
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: CT
Posts: 10,677
Gallery: Karerose
Start Date: late 2003
I wish I knew then what I know now, because my kid would have had a totally different diet growing up and wouldn't be struggling now. She actually ended up worse than me which makes me very sad. However, I raised her on my own so it would have been easy to do it the right way - no one else would have had a say in it.

Since you do have the husband to deal with I would suggest switching the things you can. Besides the other suggestions, how about buying some of that sprouted bread from Trader Joe's? If you don't have that store maybe there are other places to get it. Also Joseph's makes some low carb pita bread and lavash breads. Not totally good, but with the addition of flax it is better than regular bread. She would probably find those little pockets fun because they were different. Also you could make some cheese crackers to have on hand when she wants crackers. Make a bunch of mini quiches to have on hand for breakfast and telling her she is getting her very own breakfast pie. Buy the lowest carb fruits. For a treat whip up some cream and let her dip her strawberries in it. Make up batches of the cream cheese clouds with various flavors. You could even melt up some lower carb dark chocolate and mix it it for the chocolate treats. In the summer I love adding lemonade koolaid (unsweetened) and sweeten without sugar and the cold lemonade flavored cloud feels like a yummy summer treat.

Other family members may be giving her some regular junk, but if at home you can switch what you buy so it is still low carb, but not necessarily noticeable to others it couldn't hurt.

Last edited by Karerose; 03-05-2013 at 01:06 PM..
Karerose is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2013, 01:50 PM   #24
Major LCF Poster!
 
Knittering's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 2,709
Gallery: Knittering
Stats: (250) 236/172/150 5'8
WOE: LC
Start Date: Restart: 2/18/13
Quote:
Make up batches of the cream cheese clouds with various flavors.
Various colors, too! I bought a bunch of food coloring intended for frosting and it only takes a tiny bit to color cream cheese clouds. My daughter loves them green and purple.
Knittering is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2013, 03:22 PM   #25
Senior LCF Member
 
webcrystal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 331
Gallery: webcrystal
Stats: x11/x50/wonderland (restart 3/21/14 x95)
WOE: Low Carb
kids n carbs

Well like another poster I wish I had started earlier - now one of mine who started out puny now is chunking up and it's very much a struggle - I think it is worse for boys since men don't seem to have quite the body image knowledge the women that I know seem to. (He acts like I'm making a big deal of nothing sigh). He actually started have hyperinsulemia even before gaining weight (imagine that - causation (stupid scientists ugh)).

Anyway I get flack all the time because I'm on my Atkins soapbox from my family (even when I showed pictures of my ankles on wheat / no wheat). grrr.

Anyway - you might consider just not really making "a point" that a dinner is low carb and just make dinner. Act like you a just trying out some new recipes. If it tastes good and has meat might not be so "noticeable".

I'm like a few others here I make mostly low carb foods with a token bit of carbs such as brown rice (I like Texmati for taste) or potato, I rarely make pasta (I tell them I don't have it on hand right now .. most of the time they'll forget).

I also make flourless cookies and other desserts that are hard to tell they are low/lower carb. I have found a gluten free cake that is awesome (even my daughter who doesn't have to be gluten free loves it). While it's not low carb at least it is grain free. And I don't frost it most times - usually just dust it very lightly with powdered sugar or leave it plain (like a muffin). I also make them "mini's" rather than regular - make them feel like they had "more".

Another trick to control intake is to start with a warm soup - seems to start to fill them up a bit (more than salad I think)- and it's easy to make a low carb soup which doesn't seem low carb. I'm rather lazy so I just make a big batch and then serve a little up each day in a little coffee mug (which I heat in microwave most of the time).
__________________
Crystal

webcrystal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2013, 03:36 PM   #26
Senior LCF Member
 
webcrystal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 331
Gallery: webcrystal
Stats: x11/x50/wonderland (restart 3/21/14 x95)
WOE: Low Carb
Kid n peanut

Since someone mentioned nut allergy and school.
Even though peanuts are not in the same family as peanuts they are often cooked and processed in the same facility as peanuts so schools may or may not allow nuts if peanuts are banned (based on how/what the kids' allergies are and the severity).

Anyway just a suggestion is that a better alternative is sunflower "nut" butter. It has a fairly nutbuttery type flavor without having those pnut/nut allergens. It does have a slightly different taste so you might consider getting them used to it if they are smaller - not to say they might not like it but you never know. My daughter loves peanut butter but we don't generally have it in my house as my son tested allergic (he's never had it but still). Anyway kids tend to like stuff that they've had and developed a taste for that's why I suggest starting early

Also if you make a mix of sunflower/pumpkin seeds (done up in a blender if you can't find) - the nutrition count is sooooo much better including stuff like magnesium and zinc ... which are often severely lacking in our diets/foods.

For me I'd use a single slice of flax gf bread (which can be carby but not too bad if I watch the rest of day) with some sugar free jelly. For kids I throw local honey on it which can help with allergies. awesome!

Also you can make flourless cookies with the seed butters as well. Use molasses or honey to sweeten.

Of course there are carbs but for kids probably won't matter as much as to us who would need to limit it somewhat.
webcrystal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2013, 06:03 PM   #27
Major LCF Poster!
 
LiterateGriffin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Jacksonville, FL
Posts: 1,762
Gallery: LiterateGriffin
Stats: 236.5 start (Jan 2012) /199.7/150 goal 5'9", 42 yr
WOE: Atkins (though I think a fairly early version)
Start Date: Jan 6 2012
OK, it's late, I'm hurting and depressed (see post about my knee), so I've just skimmed some of these things....

Punkin,

The preschool I sent both of my children to had high-carb snacks that were freely available, at any time. (It's a Montessori thing, to have it THERE for the children to help themselves.)

So we couldn't address my daughter's food-issues (she's my junk food junkie) until she was out of there -- because she knew she could just hold out (ie: not eat meat or veggies) and fill up on crackers later (at school).

I feel your pain!

The nuts worked VERY well, and I can push them as "healthy fats" without having to go into "low carb" with anyone. When I'm explaining the situation, I discuss the blood-sugar drop, I mention very quickly him needing fats to keep it stable, and then bring up the nuts in the very same breath, and keep the focus there. Tree nuts and peanuts are both potential -- though unrelated -- allergens: A class will often allow one, but not the other.


Another option, especially with very young children like this is to make "cheater-snacks": Something that looks and tastes like a "normal" treat, but has less sugar and no actual grain.

http://www.lowcarbfriends.com/bbs/lo...cakes-win.html
http://www.lowcarbfriends.com/bbs/lo...tein-bars.html (Shaped like cookies and CALLED "cookies")

Just a couple examples. For the kids, I'll use a combination of stevia and touch of honey. (A little honey masks any "strangeness" from the stevia.) They get something that tastes yummy, but will actually help balance -- rather than un-balance -- their blood sugar, and is incredibly nutrient-dense.

If anyone complains, just tell them you're trying to sneak in some extra nutrients. Figure out her favorite flavors (is she a spice-gal, like me? Does she love chocolate?) and keep a bunch of "cookies" around for her to snack on whenever she wants. You can make crackers, too, that taste like goldfish, and cut them into shapes. (She can help you make them:

1 cup almond flour
1/4 cup shredded cheddar
1/4 cup water

Mix.
Cover cookie sheet in baking parchment. Turn out dough onto parchment. Cover with more parchment, roll out or flatten using your hands... and then remove the top parchment and draw shapes. (Cooked crackers will break along these lines. For grownups, rectangles or diamonds. For your daughter, you may want to get creative!) Remove top parchment and bake at 350 until golden brown (10-20 min, depending on how thin you get the dough.))



And Re: the previous poster's comments about sunflower nut-butter, etc:

My daughter, initially, would only eat "regular" commercial peanut butter. Natural peanut butter? YUCKY! Almond butter? YUCKY! And she'd go hungry rather than eat them.

Fresh-ground was a lot easier to get her to accept. It's more like the "regular" stuff in consistency than the jars of "natural peanut butter".

If she DOESN'T accept whatever you're trying to switch her to, try stirring together whatever she's starting from and whatever you're transitioning her to, and gradually tweak the proportions.
LiterateGriffin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2013, 07:46 PM   #28
Way too much time on my hands!
 
kittycitygirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Near The Burgh! :)
Posts: 11,512
Gallery: kittycitygirl
Stats: High:215; current 168
WOE: Low Carb: my way;)
Start Date: April 3, 2010
Worry, yes, my adult (in his 20s) son has diabetes. I worry every day about him and his future. Diagnosed almost 3 years ago. Was it caused by the junk we allowed him to eat throughout his childhood? No proof, but shedding guilty tears here right now. Wish I could go back in time....he was never heavy, always on the thin side, still is, so never thought there was a problem with eating the carbs he did. Now, he's on insulin....

You, not your children, decide what they will have available to eat in your home. When you send them to daycare, the staff works for you. At school, pack healthy lunches. You decide what they will be fed. Would you allow them to do other non healthy things? Smoke, etc.?

Yes, they are eating good foods....they are NOT on Atkins. They are eating healthy. Fruits and veg.s, proteins, healthy fats, water to drink.......things they need to grow up as healthy as you can help them become. A carby treat at a special occasion is to be special, not daily, or several times a day.

Do what you can to keep your kids healthy while you still have time. Please! Before its too late.
__________________
My attempt at journaling
kittycitygirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2013, 08:55 PM   #29
Major LCF Poster!
 
Arctic_Mama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Alaska
Posts: 2,779
Gallery: Arctic_Mama
Stats: 257/145.8/140
WOE: Atkins 2002/Protocol
Start Date: Began losing 10/08. Working off last 20 lbs.
I'm the mom and gatekeeper - my kids only eat what I make, my husband only eats what I prepare unless it is food he buys for himself (I know for a fact he grabs ice cream when it is on sale and pop tarts for his car - he's a grown man and I won't comment one whit on his choices unless asked, and he extends me the same courtesy ).

I don't worry about my kids over-much, since I'm their educator as well as the cook around here. So I explain, in the same manner I teach phonics and math facts, that some foods help us grow healthy and strong and some are just for enjoying occasionally, but aren't the best fuel to help us run faster, jumper higher, etc. This works just fine on the five and four year old, and the two year old just eats what is put in front of him (and if he doesn't, he gets served the same food at the next meal until he is hungry enough to comply, since I'm the boss ).

While I am low carb, my family is not. That means there is bread in the house, and I do bake for them or pick up a dessert occasionally. That's okay, too! My husband's tolerance for carbs is much better than mine, and my children do just fine with the occasional treat. When I make them breakfast every morning, I teach them balance - if we're having porridge or toast, we're also having cottage cheese, bacon, or eggs so it all sticks with them longer. I sweeten their food with stevia when I can. Crackers and cheese spread (its a delicious recipe, like cheese ball in a slightly softer form) is a perfectly fine lunch. Thou they do have some of my genetics, there is no need for me to get overly concerned or neurotic about their diets just yet when whole foods, home cooked fare is what they get daily and show no sensitivities from it. So while I don't go out of my way to feed them starch, I'd say they have a serving or two of it at every meal.

Normal breakfasts I make are:
Cottage cheese with 1 tsp jam/banana/sausage
Oatmeal/eggs/banana or orange
If we're on the go they get a 1/4 cup or so of nuts and some pop tart, but this happens maybe once a month

Lunch is always a veggie/fruit/main dish combo:
PB&J, apples, steamed broccoli
Mac n' cheese, pears, mixed steamed veggies
Hot dog w/no bun, orange, celery w/peanut butter
Cheese and pepperoni on crackers, carrot sticks, apple sauce

Dinner is much the same - whatever main course I make and a combo of veggie and fruit served with it (how convenient that their plates have three slots, divided plates rule!).

Snacks are things like cheese, pistachios, sugar snap peas, apple, seaweed, popcorn occasionally. They oftentimes get no snacks, but if we'e running around or having a hungry day and a main meal is more than an hour away, I'll give them some satisfying snack like those listed above, portioned out, and send them on their way to eat it. If I'm cooking dinner or they just want food because they're bored (like watching a cartoon and wanting to munch) I will flat out tell them 'not now, we'll eat a nice meal in a little bit'. This is all part of parenting - training their minds AND setting norms regarding food. In our house it is moderation and homemade things, with the occasional treat thrown in. And it doesn't need to get crazier than that. Those sample menus have grown my kids just fine so far with no food issues and weight/energy problems. Unless they are displaying things like LiterateGriffin mentioned, a basic diet that is light on sugar and food dyes but reasonable with portions of starch and fruit based sugars is just fine.

Your mileage may vary, but I'm as big a health but as they come and still try not to obsess over my children's diets. I prepare a combo of tasty, fun, healthy foods and control other options (they aren't even aware I'm doing it, or that my Mac n' cheese is from fresh cheese and not out of a box, or their oatmeal doesn't have any sugar, little things like that) with the remembrance that a little cake or ice cream every once in awhile is just fine, too. We could go totally low carb with everyone, but there just hasn't been a need. And taking a moderate but overall healthful approach with the rest of the family keeps any criticisms my husband or extended family might have at bay. Instead, they just believe I have very compliant, healthful eaters
__________________
Taryl - 5'2" powerhouse!
http://www.aurorafiberarts.com/weightloss

On a pregnancy break with baby #5 until January 2015
Arctic_Mama is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2013, 08:59 PM   #30
Major LCF Poster!
 
Arctic_Mama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Alaska
Posts: 2,779
Gallery: Arctic_Mama
Stats: 257/145.8/140
WOE: Atkins 2002/Protocol
Start Date: Began losing 10/08. Working off last 20 lbs.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Punkin View Post
I have a friend who is basically doing the opposite and taking a hard line with her family, and the stress it is causing her is unbelievable. It has completely torn the family apart. Her kids fight with her when she tries to restrict their food (she is doing gluten free). And her mother in law tells her what a bad mother she is and it is a nightmare. It has gotten to the point where she can't even go over to her extended families houses, and she is in tears every night. I see this, and think is it worth it? Kids don't understand why she is trying so hard with their diet, she tries to explain it, but they don't understand. And she is really frustrated. I feel so bad for her.

I have basically just done the LC thing and hoped people see the results and improvement in my health and maybe get on board with the idea. I got my sister onto Atkins and she is only 5lbs away from goal, she like me, things LC is a miracle. So it is basically the two of us, against everyone else. She is lucky in the sense that her kids don't like HC foods. The genetics on her husband's side is much better than mine too.

I guess I will just keep trying and hopefully things will get better. Making food fun might just be the answer
Easy trick - my kids will eat almost ANYTHING out of a fun container, cut up into pieces. You'd think carrot circles, sugar snap peas, and a handful of walnuts were prepackaged trail mix to watch my kids scarf them when I put them in a Baggie or cup, as opposed to on a plate. Novelty can be super simple. Or if your daughter is counting, do a 5 plate - five of one item, four of another, three of the next, etc etc.

An example of a 5 plate would be - five apple slices, four celery sticks with spread, three pieces of cheese, two lunch meat rolls, and one square of dark chocolate or a cookie. Then point out the various counts to her, it makes it fun and is educational (most kids like counting down as they munch things ).
Arctic_Mama is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 08:53 AM.


Copyright ©1999-2014 Friends Forums LLC. All rights reserved. - Terms of Service | Privacy Policy
LowCarbFriends® is a registered mark of Friends Forums, LLC.