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-   -   Has this study already been discussed? (http://www.lowcarbfriends.com/bbs/main-lowcarb-lobby/798605-has-study-already-been-discussed.html)

Gretalyn 03-03-2013 07:09 AM

Has this study already been discussed?
 
PLOS ONE: The Relationship of Sugar to Population-Level Diabetes Prevalence: An Econometric Analysis of Repeated Cross-Sectional Data

The results of this study won't be newsworthy to anyone here, but might come as a surprise to some people that I know. The study shows a causative link between sugar intake and diabetes.

But before I go posting it on my Facebook page, I was wondering if anyone is aware of any flaws in the methodology, or if this is a well-designed study. I just hate it when people make a big deal of a study "proving" that a high-fat diet caused whatever disease, only to find out that it was a high-fat AND high-sugar diet - that sort of thing. I don't want to promote junk science. From what I can understand of this study, it looks really good. Thoughts?

svenskamae 03-03-2013 08:11 AM

It looks like a well-designed and reasonably presented epidemiological study to me. There are limits to epidemiological studies of this type, but the authors do a good job of acknowledging those limitations.

ravenrose 03-03-2013 08:55 AM

The Eating Academy website has a detailed analysis of how this was done, what that means scientifically, etc. Very good!

Gretalyn 03-03-2013 12:35 PM

Great, thank you both!

Mistizoom 03-03-2013 01:06 PM

This looks like a good study. I especially like that they found sugar, not obesity in and of itself, is a factor in diabetes:

Quote:

we see that sugar availability remained a significant correlate to diabetes prevalence independent of obesity and total calorie consumption. When obesity was removed from the model, the effect size of sugar was not significantly amplified (beta = 0.0081, p<0.001), suggesting that obesity does not appear to account for the major part of the impact of sugar on diabetes.

avid 03-03-2013 01:15 PM

I really enjoy when sutdies such as this are shared.
It reaffirms my belief that this is a great site and one that I am wise
to visit daily.

Rhubarb 03-03-2013 03:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by avid (Post 16293009)
I really enjoy when sutdies such as this are shared.
It reaffirms my belief that this is a great site and one that I am wise
to visit daily.

Here's a short article with some good links to Taubes and others about this study. The NY Times food writer Mark Bittman wrote about it today as well. It's a big, big story.

DiamondDeb 03-03-2013 04:28 PM

Thanks for sharing this. Very interesting.

I'll be interested to see how big sugar business handles this information. I suspect it will either be ignored or rationalized as a meaningless study for some made-up reason. Sugar-filled products are big business and big profits. For that reason I don't think we will see changes.

We can count ourselves lucky to have discovered a healthy lifestyle despite having the odds stacked against it.

avid 03-03-2013 08:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rhubarb (Post 16293232)
Here's a short article with some good links to Taubes and others about this study. The NY Times food writer Mark Bittman wrote about it today as well. It's a big, big story.


Wow!! that times article is terrifying. How glad am i to have eliminated sugar from my diet.
Or should I say "try" to eliminate sugar from my diet. It is a minor ingrediant in most processed foods.

Gretalyn 03-04-2013 10:42 AM

Thanks to everyone for the additional comments and links! :cool:

fiddlejen 03-04-2013 11:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/02/27/its-the-sugar-folks/

The next steps are obvious, logical, clear and up to the Food and Drug Administration. To fulfill its mission, the agency must respond to this information by re-evaluating the toxicity of sugar, arriving at a daily value — how much added sugar is safe? — and ideally removing fructose (the “sweet” molecule in sugar that causes the damage) from the “generally recognized as safe” list, because that’s what gives the industry license to contaminate our food supply.

Yeah, like that's gonna happen!

(Although... I'd certainly join the applause if it really does..)


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