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avid 02-22-2013 04:39 AM

oil for grilling
 
I use the grill for meat and fish.
I wonder what oil LCF's use to keep things from sticking.
It is my understanding that vegetable based oils are not good for
the high heat of the grill.
Coconut oil is supposed to ok, but it smokes badly on the grill.
I don't eat much bacon, or else I guess it would be a good choice.
Is lard good for this?
I wouldn't even know where to go to get lard.
Suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

muncheechee 02-22-2013 05:01 AM

Peanut oil?

LiterateGriffin 02-22-2013 06:26 AM

For lard.... Go look at the absolute cheapest "margarine" sticks sold in your local store. Pick it up and look at the ingredients. (When I was in college, I did this, and it had one ingredient: Lard. Which explained why it wasn't tasting right on my toast.)

I've usually been able to find lard in the "poor people's" grocery stores -- be it FoodMaxx or IGA, it varies by town, but will be catering to large minority/hispanic populations, and the floors won't be as clean. ~chuckles~ It'll also be the store that carries things like tongue and tripe.

Hubby does the grilling, not me... Typically, he's got a bowl of melted butter (with STUFF in it, and I do not ask about the STUFF)... I am forbidden to touch the grill or even look at it too hard, as this is Man Stuff.

Mistizoom 02-22-2013 06:41 AM

I've always used olive oil for grilled meats and vegetables.

1sweettea1 02-22-2013 06:44 AM

Literate, you made me :lol:

Man Stuff, indeed!

Mistizoom 02-22-2013 06:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LiterateGriffin (Post 16273830)
For lard.... Go look at the absolute cheapest "margarine" sticks sold in your local store. Pick it up and look at the ingredients. (When I was in college, I did this, and it had one ingredient: Lard. Which explained why it wasn't tasting right on my toast.)

I've usually been able to find lard in the "poor people's" grocery stores -- be it FoodMaxx or IGA, it varies by town, but will be catering to large minority/hispanic populations, and the floors won't be as clean. ~chuckles~ It'll also be the store that carries things like tongue and tripe.

Be careful with the grocery store lard, it often is adulterated with partially hydrogentated lard. If you can find one that just says "lard" as an ingredient, go for it! But I've never found one at the grocery store like that. I buy mine direct from a farmer co-op type place in 4 lb tubs (last one cost $25!). However I don't use it for grilling. ;) You might try an actual butcher shop if you can find one. Websites such as "eat wild" and "local harvest" tend to have info on places to find high quality items direct from farmers such as good lard. Leaf lard is the best, but that is expensive.

Dottie 02-22-2013 07:17 AM

Ghee works, too :)

clackley 02-22-2013 12:58 PM

Bacon fat. Works really well at high heat. I also buy duck fat at my farmer's market that is good for high heat. Hmmmm, can't wait to be able to grill outdoors again.

avid 02-22-2013 04:06 PM

Man stuff .............LOL
yes, the grill is definetly my domain.
I'm tempted to get some bacon
I usually don't eat bacon...just too greasy for me,
but I do on occasion enjoy some with tomato and mozzarella (add a dash of basil, yummy)
Also ghee is a great suggestion

svenskamae 02-22-2013 04:11 PM

Avid, you might like the way that I cook bacon. I bake it at 250 degrees in the oven for about an hour, draped over a wire cooling rack in a big baking pan (the sort of pan you'd make a sheet cake in, 9 inches by 11 or 13 inches). The fat drains out of the bacon and can be poured into a jar and kept in the fridge for use like barbeque grease and to saute greens. And you can bake the bacon until it's very crispy and not very greasy, if that's your preference. The only disadvantage is that your house will smell like bacon--and not everyone considers that a disadvantage.

buttoni 02-22-2013 06:49 PM

Ghee (clarified butter), coconut oil, palm oil or palm shortening would be my recommendation. 450 flash point or higher on those: Smoke point - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

theredhead 02-23-2013 04:24 PM

I used to always grease my grill with Pam Grilling spray, but in the past year or so, I've discovered that I don't need any oil if I heat my grill hot enough before I put the meat on. Then I don't try to move the meat until it is well-seared and lifts easily. I haven't had anything stick in ages.

Doug_H 02-23-2013 04:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by theredhead (Post 16276835)
I used to always grease my grill with Pam Grilling spray, but in the past year or so, I've discovered that I don't need any oil if I heat my grill hot enough before I put the meat on. Then I don't try to move the meat until it is well-seared and lifts easily. I haven't had anything stick in ages.

This.:goodpost:
A hot grill won't stick.

emel 02-24-2013 04:06 AM

You want to stay away from polyunsaturated fats when you're heating them.

So butter/ghee, beef fat, palm kernal oil, and coconut oil are best.
Followed by lard, regular palm oil, olive oil.

There's some talk of the mufas in olive oil breaking down worse than its saturated profile suggests. Mark Sisson cites a study in which:
Quote:

...subjects were given heated olive oil meals, heated safflower oil meals, unheated olive oil meals, and unheated safflower oil meals. Both of the heated oils and the unheated safflower oil resulted in elevated postprandial oxidative markers, while eating unheated olive oil resulted in none. Note, though, that the olive oil was probably refined or light (otherwise they would have called it “virgin” or “extra virgin”) and thus devoid of significant phenolics with antioxidant properties.
But then later in the article, Sisson says
Quote:

Let’s put it to rest – olive oil, especially good quality virgin olive oil with all the phenolics intact, is decently resistant to heat-incurred oxidative damage and a great addition to your diet. And if you’re worried about exposure damage, adding a bit of vitamin E to olive oil seems to reduce oxidation.

Sisson, by the way, suggests lard, poultry fat, and ghee for heating.

The takeaway point is that polyunsaturated fats break down into awful toxins, so avoid heating them, and choose the more stable fats--the ones with the highest saturated fat.

avid 02-24-2013 05:21 AM

I'm very interested in the ghee. Is it generally available in supermarkets or is it pretty much a health food store item?

LiterateGriffin 02-24-2013 05:28 AM

It's easier to find in health food stores, though I've seen it in some regular ones...

Of course, you can make your own:

Ingredients:

1 pound unsalted butter
Preparation:

Using a medium saucepan, heat butter on medium heat.

Allow butter to melt and bring to a boil, stirring constantly. You will notice that the oil will separate itself. The top will begin to froth; remove froth.

Allow the oil to become clear. Once clear, remove from heat and allow to cool for 15 minutes.

After cooling, strain ghee through a very fine strainer into container or jar, or through 3-5 layers of cheesecloth.

Put lid on container and store on shelf.

avid 02-24-2013 05:36 AM

:goodpost:

I'm always so impressed by you "do it yourselvers" in the kitchen.
You make it sound so easy and effortless.
LOL....I can just see me filling the house up with smoke and
burning my hands straining the mixture.
I think I'll be a big wuss and buy it at the local health store.
but thanks for the post,
I really enjoyed reading it.

emel 02-24-2013 05:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LiterateGriffin (Post 16277299)
It's easier to find in health food stores, though I've seen it in some regular ones...

Of course, you can make your own:

Ingredients:

1 pound unsalted butter
Preparation:

Using a medium saucepan, heat butter on medium heat.

Allow butter to melt and bring to a boil, stirring constantly. You will notice that the oil will separate itself. The top will begin to froth; remove froth.

Allow the oil to become clear. Once clear, remove from heat and allow to cool for 15 minutes.

After cooling, strain ghee through a very fine strainer into container or jar, or through 3-5 layers of cheesecloth.

Put lid on container and store on shelf.

Technically speaking, that's clarified butter. This is a very small point because either clarified butter or ghee would be fine for using to grease the grill.

For ghee, you need to cook the butter a little longer, until the solids at the bottom of the pan start to brown and give off a nutty taste/aroma. The liquified fat will begin to turn golden and its smell might remind you of popcorn. Be careful not to let the solid sediment get too brown, or it will impart a burnt taste to the liquid part.

avid 02-24-2013 04:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by svenskamae (Post 16275092)
Avid, you might like the way that I cook bacon. I bake it at 250 degrees in the oven for about an hour, draped over a wire cooling rack in a big baking pan (the sort of pan you'd make a sheet cake in, 9 inches by 11 or 13 inches). The fat drains out of the bacon and can be poured into a jar and kept in the fridge for use like barbeque grease and to saute greens. And you can bake the bacon until it's very crispy and not very greasy, if that's your preference. The only disadvantage is that your house will smell like bacon--and not everyone considers that a disadvantage.

And that disadvantage is the deal breaker.
My wife is very sensitive to certain smells. Bacon is one of them. It's why I cook it outside on the grill. Alas, twas a great suggestion otherwise.

synger 02-24-2013 06:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by avid (Post 16277288)
I'm very interested in the ghee. Is it generally available in supermarkets or is it pretty much a health food store item?

I buy mine at the local Asian grocery store. I've never seen it in the regular groceries.


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