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unna 01-10-2013 05:30 AM

Family History?
 
First, I'm not implying that low-carb is a cure-all.

That said, is anyone else out there sort of worried about your family history of disease? Does it influence you to eat a certain way?

My Mom (69) has Multiple Sclerosis. She's had it since I was born. She can walk a bit, but not much anymore. She also had part of her thyroid removed. The whole time I was growing up, she was on a low-fat, WW - esque, low protein diet. She was always fatigued. She ate tons of bread products and fat-free dairy. She could never get really skinny - always yo-yoing up and down, losing muscle every time.

My Dad (65) has terrible IBS. He also has severe heart disease. I think he will have to have another stent put in soon. He has high blood pressure, gout, and arthritis. He loves fast food, cookies, and chips. Both of my parents are overweight.

My parents are both relatively young. I wish they could be enjoying their retirement. I recently broke down and sent my mother the New Atkins book and cookbook. She tried it once in the past with my father (about 20 years ago) and they both lost a lot of weight and were feeling good. But then she caved because everyone kept telling her it was bad for my dad's heart. I hope it at least helps them lose a few pounds so they can move around easier.

My sister (36) still has a pretty bad problem with acne, is now having IBS issues like my dad, and is lactose intolerant.

While I don't believe diet is a cure-all - there are some things we simply cannot avoid - I hope that it may help prevent me from showing my family history. In effect, I avoid too many carbs, any glutin in particular, and eat a good amount of healthy fats (no rancid oils!). I generally only eat aged or probiotic dairy products, and I eat a good amount of fermented foods every day for gut health (many studies have linked gut health with MS).

I hope this post doesn't sound inconsiderate to any of you out there who are suffering from MS or heart disease. I was just wondering if anyone's family history spurs them to keep on plan.... as a preventitive measure (if prevention is even possible).

Becky 01-10-2013 05:39 AM

My grandmother (dad's side) was the WW Queen! She was constantly on WW and was always overweight.

My mom was tested for food sensitivities and has major issues with wheat.

Both of my sisters have Hashimotos, one is a lifelong vegetarian and not overweight, but she does TONS of hiking. The other is about 40-50lbs overweight and exercises a bit but doesn't bother with her eating habits at all.

Everyone in my direct family was skinny as kids but gained as soon as they hit 30 or so, mostly apple shapes in the family.

Amazingly no terrible health issues (those are on my husband's side). My grandparents all lived into their 90's.

girondet 01-10-2013 05:48 AM

Yes I have autoimmune disease in my family, have Hasimotos myself and some rather nasty antibodies for other diseases I'm trying to reduce. I track them and they have reduced and other health markers have improved since I have been following an autoimmune protocol similar to yours.

My plan keeps me slimmer, healthier and feeling better, but I definitely don't find it easy. The fear factor keeps me on it.

avid 01-10-2013 05:56 AM

No reasonable person would claim that lc is a cure all, but for the family diseases and conditions you described, I think LC would help tremendously. Most obvious of course is the IBS...Eliminating gluten has been shown to improve or cure that condition. Same with many skin conditions. As for lactose intolerance, well dairy is a big part of many lc diets so maybe not so much help there.
The two biggies are the ms and heart disease. Dr. Terry Wahls has had amazing success with MS using a paleo diet. She went from being in a wheelchair to being fully mobile just by changing her diet. "The wahls foundation" is her org.
As for heart disease, more and more research is finding that low cholesterol is not the panacea for heart health once thought.
Yes, trans fat is deadly, but more and more studies are showing that saturated fat may not be the ultimate bad guy in heart disease....but rather the carbs.
My own personal history bears this out. I have taken two cholesterol drugs for over 12 years. lipitor and tricor which lowers triglycerides.
When I went lc, I stopped the tricor figuring my lack of carbs would reduce my tiglycerides but kept taking the 40 mg of lipotor
after only 3 months of lc i got my bloodwork....ALL of my values improved. My hdl went up by one point, my LDL went down by several points, my triglyceride level went down by alot...even though I stopped the medication for it, and my total cholesterol was also down.
I do exercise regularly but was doing so before going lc.
I feel very healthy and fit for a 63 year old whose father died at 48 from a massive coronary. So yes, my family history is not good either.
Wishing you and your family health and happiness.

mom23kids 01-10-2013 06:04 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by unna (Post 16185240)
First, I'm not implying that low-carb is a cure-all.

That said, is anyone else out there sort of worried about your family history of disease? Does it influence you to eat a certain way?

My Mom (69) has Multiple Sclerosis. She's had it since I was born. She can walk a bit, but not much anymore. She also had part of her thyroid removed. The whole time I was growing up, she was on a low-fat, WW - esque, low protein diet. She was always fatigued. She ate tons of bread products and fat-free dairy. She could never get really skinny - always yo-yoing up and down, losing muscle every time.

My Dad (65) has terrible IBS. He also has severe heart disease. I think he will have to have another stent put in soon. He has high blood pressure, gout, and arthritis. He loves fast food, cookies, and chips. Both of my parents are overweight.

My parents are both relatively young. I wish they could be enjoying their retirement. I recently broke down and sent my mother the New Atkins book and cookbook. She tried it once in the past with my father (about 20 years ago) and they both lost a lot of weight and were feeling good. But then she caved because everyone kept telling her it was bad for my dad's heart. I hope it at least helps them lose a few pounds so they can move around easier.

My sister (36) still has a pretty bad problem with acne, is now having IBS issues like my dad, and is lactose intolerant.

While I don't believe diet is a cure-all - there are some things we simply cannot avoid - I hope that it may help prevent me from showing my family history. In effect, I avoid too many carbs, any glutin in particular, and eat a good amount of healthy fats (no rancid oils!). I generally only eat aged or probiotic dairy products, and I eat a good amount of fermented foods every day for gut health (many studies have linked gut health with MS).

I hope this post doesn't sound inconsiderate to any of you out there who are suffering from MS or heart disease. I was just wondering if anyone's family history spurs them to keep on plan.... as a preventitive measure (if prevention is even possible).

Family history is a HUGE reason why I decided to get control over my weight (but I don't LC and instead follow an IF plan which has promising research for health benefits). The trend among women in my family is to start out thin. Have babies in their late 20's early 30s, start gaining weight, by 40 are obese and by 50 the multitude of health problems start. Almost every older woman in my family has had breast cancer and at 34yrs old my dr. wants me to start getting mammograms :stars: Also diabetes, high blood pressure and weird things like my mom now has some bizarre bone disease where her bones are at high risk to collapse on themselves (not osteoporosis though). She's now giving herself daily injections to slow it down :p On the male side of my family, diabetes, heart diseases/heart attacks, high blood pressure and then alcoholism have wreaked havoc (the alcohol part killing both my grandfathers :doh: ). Soooo, my family tree is a big health mess :down: Being thin can't guarantee good health for me, but it sure can't hurt, and hopefully it will decrease my chances of disease when I get older!

jem51 01-10-2013 08:52 AM

Much of family history is diet related but even autoimmune can be controlled w diet.

clackley 01-10-2013 01:40 PM

I began Atkins many years ago in an effort to ward off type 2 diabetes. My beloved Mother had passed away from complications of that disease a short time before. It motivates me to this day.

svenskamae 01-10-2013 02:09 PM

People in both my mother's and my father's family tended to survive into their late 80s, and my parents both died when they were in their early 90s, so I assume that I lucked out in terms of my genes. But both my parents grew up on farms and would have eaten a lot of traditional foods. (I remember the flaky piecrusts made with lard, the bone-broth-based vegetable soups, meals rather than snacking, and the absence of junk/convenience food in my childhood, along with eating tons of vegetables grown organically and canned to get us through the winter.)

So was it just genetic luck or what Sally Fallon would call "Nourishing Traditions" in terms of the food my parents ate throughout their long, healthy, active lives? Probably some of both. I'm returning somewhat to my cooking/eating roots with a primal/paleo diet, though my family did eat grains and occasional sugar. So I guess you could say my parents set a positive example that I'm returning to, and I hope that I enjoy good health through a long life, like them.

Taxbane 01-10-2013 02:20 PM

Interestingly, "Family History" is generally used to imply "genetics" as the primary culprit. However, while genetics always plays some role, so does "enviornment," which IMO includes a person's diet, supplements, exercise regimine, as well as exposure to chemical, physical, phychological/emotional stimuli in the external enviornment as well as internal (i.e. positive thinking/prayer etc...).

That said, my Dad has Type 2 Diabetes, so genetically I know it is a possibility for me, and all the more reason to continue eating a LC WOE, on top of the LC's other benefits which I am enjoying that include aesthetics (below 20% Body Fat), lower blood pressure, cured of gerd/acid reflux, also have more energy, and don't require a 15 min insulin nap after dinner.

rubidoux 01-10-2013 09:22 PM

I come from a long line of healthy fat people. :D Yay me! At least my mother's people. They live well into their 90s and stay in good shape, although fat, of course. :D But, I mean, they're able to take care of themselves until the bitter end. My great-grandmother waited something like 60 years for her first husband to die so that she could marry her high school sweetheart, which she did when she was in her late 80s. A couple of years later she built a deck on the back of her house, single-handedly, so that she could do some entertaining. When she was 94 she had open heart surgery, and survived for several more years after that.

I haven't met my father or anyone on that side, but they actually seem to have all died young, but, reading between the lines it looks like a hell of a lot of suicide, including my (never-met) 32 year old half-brother. I'm not sure if LC would address that, but it couldn't hurt.

But I am the unlucky one in my mom's line and have type I diabetes, which all the motivation I need.

princessmommy 01-11-2013 03:54 AM

I have a family history on my Dads side of type 2 diabetes and Kidney disease on my Moms side. I always worried about the diabetes But never did anything about it really until I started having episodes (as my Dad calls them) of Hypoglysemia. I wouldn't eat breakfast then i'd eat Junk and HC for lunch and wonder why I would feel like crud! I didn't really even realize the "episodes" of HG were gone after I started LC until later when my Dad said something about it and I realized I hadn't felt like crud in quite awhile. :o All I do know if I Feel sooo good on LC and when I slip up and don't eat right I feel it!

Maumie 01-11-2013 06:56 AM

Great post! I am terrified of the genetics in my family showing up in me. Both of my parents were obese and had diabetes. Neither of them were active and died early of diseases stemming from their lifestyle. Thank you for this much needed reminder, unna!

socaligirl714 01-11-2013 11:10 AM

Both my parents are diabetic, have high blood pressure high cholestrol.
Its in our genes and im scared to get it.. I try to encourage them to try low carb, they will semi then fall off. I cant say anything because i do too but i really wish they would try it because they are both on insulin shots

whenever i make a new low carb recipe i take some over so they can try it and see you can still eat good

Janknitz 01-11-2013 01:07 PM

BOTH parents had acquired heart disease, Mom had diabetes and Alzheimers and her mom had Alzheimers. I know I can't change the genetics, but I can change my own diet and health.

There is a theory that Alzheimers is really "Diabetes Type III"--in other words, it's the far end of the continuum that begins with insulin resistance which I've had since childhood (although I was a very thin kid!) and PCOS.

The only things in my control are diet and exercise. So that's what I'm doing. Hope it works.

taokeema 01-11-2013 09:36 PM

obesity, T2D, and CVD are rampant on both sides of my family, and one side is plagued with mood disorders. i have seen too many lives ravaged by T2D to put my husband through the torture of losing me that way. so when i saw the scale heading for 200 and started getting short of breath walking up stairs, i knew i had to put the brakes on, or i was heading over the cliff.

my basic diet was healthy, at least according to the food pyramid, but i had a hard time controlling snacks and sweets, just like all my aunts, my paternal grandmother, and my mom. i did my own WOE this time around, paying attention to how food made me feel, first dropping all refined carbs, and then going low carb. i was amazed how cravings, compulsion, and hunger disappeared for me. then i started reading everything i could get my hands on about nutrition, and was shocked to find nutrition-based explanations for so many of the maladies suffered by my family. the most recent thing i've done is added more healthy fat into my diet, and i'm so pleased how much my mood has improved.

family history is totally the reason i am here.

froggyx6 01-12-2013 07:57 AM

I'm almost 61 years old and a two time cancer survivor...bone and breast. My dad died from cancer and my mom is an insulin dependent diabetic. I've been a diabetic for almost 20 years but no insulin yet. I'm determined not to get there. I get so frustrated watching my mom MOCK the diabetes...she uses the insulin as a way to eat whatever she wants (is probably 50 lbs. overweight), she has no feeling in her feet (they are both blue) and spends her days (and a lot of nights) sitting in a recliner. She's 82. I do not want to be like her so I eat pretty strict low carb, stay active and do what the doctor tells me to do. I teach preschool and figure as long as I can keep up with 4 year olds...I'm good!


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