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Old 08-20-2012, 10:12 PM   #1
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Carbohydrates in Greek Yogurt

Hi Everyone,

Sorry for all the questions but I was told something about greek yogurt I wanted to confirm.

I was told the carb count on the carton of say plain greek yogurt (even most yogurts) are not correct since they consider it before making the yogurt. I even saw it in a news article but never believe everthing I read.

Is the carb count right on or is it different. I haven't been brave enough to make my own yogurt.

Thanks everyone for your help and support. Val
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Old 08-21-2012, 05:51 AM   #2
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I don't believe it myself, some people swear that yogurt magically loses carbs. However, Greek yogurt is lower carb then regular because the whey is removed.
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Old 08-21-2012, 06:09 AM   #3
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Yes, I do think that is correct. The bacteria do alter the carb count but the manufacturer has to list and account for the ingredients that are added in the making. As Xamier says, the whey is the most 'carby' portion of yogurt and draining that as is done with Greek yogurt makes for a less carby yogurt.

Making your own yogurt is an easy and rewarding process and the best thing is that you can control the ingredients. Lately I have been using organic goat's milk which is great but this week I will be using a mix of organic milk and hwc.
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Old 08-21-2012, 07:44 AM   #4
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I recently bought a yogurt maker and was thinking about making my own, but I'm concerned about the carbs in milk. I had thought about almond milk but that won't work, so could someone please tell me what they use, and share their recipe.

Thanks!
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Old 08-21-2012, 08:33 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SharonB61 View Post
I recently bought a yogurt maker and was thinking about making my own, but I'm concerned about the carbs in milk. I had thought about almond milk but that won't work, so could someone please tell me what they use, and share their recipe.

Thanks!
You just don`t want to use a low fat milk. The carb count is greatly reduced due to the fermentation process. I buy 3.8% m.f. and sometimes mix in h.w.c. for a ridiculously luxurious yogurt. Let it ferment for at least 20 hours and up to 24 hours to get the tangiest yogurt.
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Old 08-21-2012, 10:28 AM   #6
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Thank you! I will try that........
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Old 08-21-2012, 10:30 AM   #7
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1 thing is for sure!

the miore fat they take out, the more carbs go in. Love & Profits: FLATFERENGHI
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Old 08-21-2012, 11:50 AM   #8
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I don't believe it. I've read this, as well. I've also read that it's a myth. For every fact, there appears to be an equal and opposite fact.

I don't have a definitive answer. Personally, I look for the lowest carb, fulll fat, "plain" greek yogurt. Sometimes, I'll even strain it overnight in a coffee filter (YoCheese!). Then, the next day, I'll mix in some fruit and/or sugar free jam, liquid sucralose and touch of salt. I count the carbs on the tub of yogurt, but secretly believe I might be somehow benefitting from these myths and the mild excess removal of a bit more whey.
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Old 08-21-2012, 12:51 PM   #9
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It took me some trial and error, but I am now a yoghurt making goddess! Or at least some minor royalty (Baroness?).

I boil a big pot of water, and add in a large spoon, candy thermometer and tongs and let those boil for 5-10 mins. Then I pour the hot water into my cleaned crockpot to "sterilize" the pot. I then use the pan to bring the milk to about 185F over a gentle heat. Empty the crockpot of water and pour the milk in it. Let it sit and cool down to about 110F before adding the starter yoghurt. (I use Danone's full fat yoghurt, since they seem to be the only ones with just milk and live active cultures and nothing else) Put the lid on.

At this point, I check on the yoghurt every 2-4 hours to make sure it remains around 110F, if not I turn on the crockpot for 30 minutes. I set my kitchen timer so I won't forget to turn it off. The BEST yoghurt I got was when I forgot about it and left it overnight (about 18 hours total), so that will be my new method. Before I remove the yoghurt, I remove the top "crust" that forms with a spoon and discard it, otherwise it can get a bit lumpy.

Feel free to strain the yoghurt, using cheese cloth and a strainer, but it is fiddly, messy and timeconsuming. I found leaving it overnight yielded just as good results, though not sure about the carb contents.
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Old 08-21-2012, 02:50 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SharonB61 View Post
I had thought about almond milk but that won't work, so could someone please tell me what they use, and share their recipe.

Thanks!
Actually you can make yogurt from almond milk. I used to make it few years ago and it was OK (nothing like a regular milk yogurt but not bad for my taste). I was making it from a home made almond milk. I can dig up the recipe for you if you want.

I make yogurt every week and sometimes I drip the yogurt for few hours to get greek yogurt. Yummy
I love my Yogurmet yogurt maker.

Last edited by tobelowcarber; 08-21-2012 at 02:51 PM..
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Old 08-21-2012, 04:09 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tobelowcarber View Post
I can dig up the recipe for you if you want.


I love my Yogurmet yogurt maker.


I would appreciate it, if you don't mind.

I have a Donvier yogurt maker. It was cheap so I decided to give it a try.
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Old 08-21-2012, 04:39 PM   #12
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Here you go Sharon. The recipe calls for honey but I think I skipped it when I used to make the yogurt. They say that the sugar is there is start the fermantation and it get eaten up by the bacteria


ALMOND, FILBERT OR MACADAMIA YOGURT
by Marjan

NUT YOGHURT RECIPE

Ingredients:
1 1/3 cup whole, RAW blanched almonds or RAW blanched hazelnuts (filberts) or RAW macadamias
2 TBL clear honey
Water
Yoghurt starter (ProGurt by GI ProHealth)

Step-by-step instructions for making nut yoghurt:

1. Put all things you need on a tea towel on the kitchen table:
blender, a fine sieve, some tea towels, the nuts, honey, two tablespoons, whisk, water, yoghurt maker + yoghurt container. Get the probiotics out of the freezer only when you need them.
2. Put nuts into blender
3. Add enough cold water to get a total of 4 to 5 cups / =1 litre
4. Add 2 tablespoons of honey
5. Blend for 10 minutes (use a stopwatch)
6. Pour about 1 cup of the nut milk through the fine sieve
(You can squeeze out more liquid if you use a teacloth and twist it firmly.)

NOW take your probiotics out of the freezer

7. Add 1/8 tsp of ProGurt yoghurt starter to the milk, per 1 quart of yogurt.
8. Stir well with whisk, add the rest of the milk, with back of spoon press out all liquids
9. Stir well and place container in yoghurt maker
10. Ferment for 8 hours.
11. Place in the fridge overnight or at least for 5 hours (overnight is better)
12. Get a bowl, put the sieve on the bowl, put a cheesecloth in the sieve
13. Pour the yoghurt in the cheesecloth so that it can drip
14. Drip for about an hour, or longer if you'd like the yoghurt thicker
15. By pressing the dripped yoghurt further, you can make something that resembles cheese

The fermentation process takes place at about 105 Fahrenheit.

As you see, I do NOT cook or heat the milk. After blending, the milk should be lukewarm, not warmer than 105F. If you heat more, the milk will separate and the fermentation will not take place.

Try to find RAW nuts that have been through minimal processing. Deep frying them may be very tasty, but it will negatively affect the outcome and it is also a bit unhealthy.

The sieve is such, that if you pour orange juice through it, there's no pulp in your glass.

This nut yoghurt is a nice and safe alternative when you cannot tolerate goat's or cow's yoghurt (yet). Go for it!
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Old 08-22-2012, 11:30 AM   #13
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There's a great thread here on this topic, which I can't find.

IIRC, there are some sugars that the bacteria can eat and others that they cannot. So, the carb content is reduced but not as much as some people claim.

With commercial yogurt, they stop the fermentation sooner than you could so that it doesn't get too sour. If you make it yourself you can ferment longer.

Much of the carbs are in the whey (the liquid part), so dumping or straining that helps.
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Old 08-23-2012, 08:08 AM   #14
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Thank you everyone so much! I think I'm going to try my hand at making some homemade.

Appreciate it more than you know!
Val
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Old 08-23-2012, 08:49 AM   #15
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It's not a myth that yogurt contains fewer carbs than it says on the label. Google 'The Yogurt Exception' for details (found the link but unsure if it's OK to post here or not). For a brief explanation:

"The problem with the stated carbohydrate content on the packages of fermented food products arises because the government makes manufacturers count the carbohydrates of food "by difference." That means they measure everything else including water and ash and fats and proteins. Then "by difference," they assume everything else is carbohydrate. This works quite well for most foods including milk. However, to make yogurt, buttermilk and kefir, the milk is inoculated with the lactic acid bacteria. These bacteria use up almost all the milk sugar called "lactose" and convert it into lactic acid. It is this lactic acid which curds the milk and gives the taste to the product. Since these bacteria have "eaten" most of the milk sugar by the time you buy it (or make it yourself.) At the time you eat it, how can there be much carbohydrate left? It is the lactic acid which is counted as carbohydrate. Therefore, you can eat up to a half cup of plain yogurt, buttermilk, or kefir and only count 2 grams of carbohydrates (Dr. Goldberg has measured this in his own laboratory.) One cup will contain about 4 grams of carbohydrates. Daily consumption colonizes the intestine with these bacteria to handle small amounts of lactose in yogurt (or even sugar-free ice cream later.) "

Hope that helps!
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Old 08-23-2012, 10:50 AM   #16
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there is no reason to think they don't test yogurt for its nutrition in its final form, just like everything else. this is a myth.
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Old 08-23-2012, 05:11 PM   #17
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there is no reason to think they don't test yogurt for its nutrition in its final form, just like everything else. this is a myth.
That's interesting. I can't find any data on it, but I'll bet that the nutrition data is calculated based on the ingredients that go in to the food. For example, if the company puts 1 cup of whole milk and 1 cup of milk solids in, the authorities simply add the nutrition facts from those ingredients. Why reinvent the wheel with each new product?

If that's how it's done, then the carbs will be overestimated in yogurt.
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Old 08-23-2012, 05:45 PM   #18
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Here's a post on another forum, where this is discussed, at length. In short, they say to count the full amount on the package.

Also, a quote from the people at Atkin's ...

Quote:
... Unfortunately, that is not true. The cultures break down lactose to glucose and galactose which allow those who are lactose intolerant to eat yogurt without discomfort. However, the full amount of sugar is still available. Yogurt along with most dairy products contain a relatively large amount of carbs. Cheese is used because the portion consumed is usually controlled. However, if one eats too much cheese they will exceed their carb levels.
Having said that about the carb count, we do not want to ignore the beneficial effect that the probiotics (beneficial bacteria) have on health. This can be obtained with a probiotic supplement . Our colon restoration formula is a good way to get these friendly bacteria without the carbs. If you really want to eat yogurt, you should select regular unflavored plain yogurt and control your portion size. You should include the carb count in your total daily intake and budget for it. ...
Some interesting reading:
The Truth about carbs in YOGURT : General Low-Carb Forum : Active Low-Carber Forums
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Old 08-27-2012, 07:43 AM   #19
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Thanks, DJ. I've been trying to find results of testing of different yogurts (that is, an analysis of the final product), but have been unsuccessful.

I sure like eating it now and then. I mix in some Nature's Hollow SF strawberry preserves (recommended), or add 1/8 tsp of Crystal Light orange or lemonade powder to 5 oz of yogurt.
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Old 08-27-2012, 07:51 AM   #20
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I think that the fermentation process does indeed change the carb count in much the same way that cheese does. The more of the whey that is removed, the lower the carb count. So while the carb listed on the ingredient labels may well be accurate this can be altered by straining it. Same goes for homemade yogurt.

Last edited by clackley; 08-27-2012 at 07:53 AM..
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Old 08-27-2012, 09:13 AM   #21
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I just eat CarbMaster yogurt from Kroger. 60 calories, 4 carbs, a bunch of different flavors (I LOVE the vanilla!) and its usually 10 for $4. I buy it 20 at a time!
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