Low Carb Friends  
Netrition.com - Tools - Reviews - Faces - Recipes - Home


Go Back   Low Carb Friends > Main Lowcarb Lobby
Register FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 07-13-2012, 03:02 PM   #1
Senior LCF Member
 
A'smommy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Dallas, TX
Posts: 583
Gallery: A'smommy
Stats: 144/129/120 5'5
WOE: My way, Lower carb, Low Calorie
Start Date: April 8th, 2014
Low carb staples with low saturated fats??

Does anyone have some suggestions for low carb staples and foods that you use/like that are low in saturated fats? Ive been looking back on my diet plans for these past few weeks and just cant wrap my head around eating so much saturated fat. On a daily basis I have been consuming between 90-100 g of total fat and between 40-50g of saturated fat. After studying in biology and learning more about fats and the processes that occur through the human bodies with different types of fats such as saturated, I just cant make myself eat such high amounts of it. I think it could be very possible to eat a low carb diet while eating mainly healthy fats and greatly lowering the amount of saturated fat! I know everyone may have different opinions on this but I was just wondering if anyone has any suggestions? I should note that I'm not really a huge meat eater either. I occasionally have chicken and other meats, but usually just eat veggies/cheeses and such!

Last edited by A'smommy; 07-13-2012 at 03:03 PM.. Reason: typo
A'smommy is offline   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old 07-13-2012, 03:35 PM   #2
Senior LCF Member
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Boston
Posts: 397
Gallery: Abby
Stats: 5'7";197_'09;167/139/132_'12
WOE: LC/VLC
I'm with you A'smommy, but you will NOT find many sympathetic listeners on this forum. Choosing monounsaturated fats like olive oil and nuts as well as Omega-3 polyunsaturated fats such as in fish is a MUCH healthier choice than saturated fats. I love sardines, tuna, salmon, shrimp, chicken, and turkey. Of course, white meats have saturated fat but at a much lower level than red meat.

Good Luck,

Last edited by Abby; 07-13-2012 at 03:37 PM..
Abby is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2012, 04:02 PM   #3
Major LCF Poster!
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Minneapolis
Posts: 2,923
Gallery: svenskamae
Stats: 235/178/135 5'3"
WOE: Nutritional Ketosis/Primal/JUDDD
Start Date: January 15, 2012
Avocados, nuts, and olive oil contain unsaturated fats. I used to rely solely on olive oil for cooking, salad dressings, etc; I still use it a lot but saute food at very low temperatures when I use olive oil now. Obviously unstarchy veggies and low-glycemic fruits are not a source of fat. You can choose meats low in saturated fats, such as chicken breast and fish and very lean grassfed (7 percent fat) ground beef.

Full fat dairy does contain saturated fat; you mention it as something that you prefer to eat. Maybe I'm wrong, but I read into your post that you think that milk-based products don't contain saturated fats but meats do. I personally eat cheese and full-fat yogurt and cottage cheese often; there are some studies (including a 16-year prospective study of 1500 adults from Australia, published in European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, in 2010) suggesting that consumption of full-fat dairy foods may prevent heart disease or stroke.

If you are uncomfortable eating a high proportion of fat in your diet, you could try a high-protein, lower fat approach like the Stillman diet.
svenskamae is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2012, 04:08 PM   #4
Very Gabby LCF Member!!!
 
Mssarge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Sunny Southern California
Posts: 3,685
Gallery: Mssarge
Stats: 220/150/145
WOE: JUDDD and moderate carbs
Start Date: 6/1/2012
A'smommy you might checking out some of the forums for suggestions. I know there are a lot of lists of low carb/low fat suggestions on the JUDDD forum. (JUDDD = Johnson's Up Day Down Day alternate day type of eating.)
Mssarge is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2012, 04:10 PM   #5
Senior LCF member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 9,758
Gallery: Leo41
Stats: 340 then/145 now
WOE: Low carb/calorie cycling
I actually eat certain fats because I follow an anti-inflammatory diet to control my severe osteoarthritis. So I use egg whites mainly rather than whole eggs (although I love the latter, and indulge sometimes--yolks are inflammatory), and I eat more fish than meat, mainly tuna, salmon, and white fish like cod and flounder. The only 'red meat' I eat is grass-fed bison, which is considerably leaner than beef.

I have had no problem losing, and now maintaining, with this WOE. Because I'm hypothyroid, I have regular blood tests, and all my values are excellent. At age 70, my BP and blood glucose are fine, and the only Rx I take are for my thyroid. Because of eating this way, I've been able to eliminate the Rx I took for my arthritis for over 20 years.
Leo41 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2012, 04:41 PM   #6
Senior LCF Member
 
A'smommy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Dallas, TX
Posts: 583
Gallery: A'smommy
Stats: 144/129/120 5'5
WOE: My way, Lower carb, Low Calorie
Start Date: April 8th, 2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by svenskamae View Post
Avocados, nuts, and olive oil contain unsaturated fats. I used to rely solely on olive oil for cooking, salad dressings, etc; I still use it a lot but saute food at very low temperatures when I use olive oil now. Obviously unstarchy veggies and low-glycemic fruits are not a source of fat. You can choose meats low in saturated fats, such as chicken breast and fish and very lean grassfed (7 percent fat) ground beef.

Full fat dairy does contain saturated fat; you mention it as something that you prefer to eat. Maybe I'm wrong, but I read into your post that you think that milk-based products don't contain saturated fats but meats do. I personally eat cheese and full-fat yogurt and cottage cheese often; there are some studies (including a 16-year prospective study of 1500 adults from Australia, published in European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, in 2010) suggesting that consumption of full-fat dairy foods may prevent heart disease or stroke.

If you are uncomfortable eating a high proportion of fat in your diet, you could try a high-protein, lower fat approach like the Stillman diet.
I guess I could have worded it better. I was trying to say that for the past few weeks I have been consuming lots of cheese/veggies and some meat, and have noticed how high my saturated fat consumption has been and I would like to lower it. Was wanting to see if anyone had any suggestions or understood where I was coming from with this! I do plan to continue to indulge in full fat dairy but would like some alternatives to lower my numbers a little bit! Thanks for your feedback, I plan to switch out olive oil more for butter and continue to eat lots of veggies!
A'smommy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2012, 04:41 PM   #7
Senior LCF Member
 
A'smommy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Dallas, TX
Posts: 583
Gallery: A'smommy
Stats: 144/129/120 5'5
WOE: My way, Lower carb, Low Calorie
Start Date: April 8th, 2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abby View Post
I'm with you A'smommy, but you will NOT find many sympathetic listeners on this forum. Choosing monounsaturated fats like olive oil and nuts as well as Omega-3 polyunsaturated fats such as in fish is a MUCH healthier choice than saturated fats. I love sardines, tuna, salmon, shrimp, chicken, and turkey. Of course, white meats have saturated fat but at a much lower level than red meat.

Good Luck,
Thanks for your feedback! I plan to cut out as much sat. fat as I can and incorporate more healthy fats rather than saturated.
A'smommy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2012, 04:42 PM   #8
Senior LCF Member
 
Alessandre's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 266
Gallery: Alessandre
Stats: 200/169/112
WOE: Nutritional Ketosis
Start Date: June 2012
I don't eat a lot of saturated fat. For me, there are plenty of choices with less or no saturated fat that I enjoy. I eat a lot of chicken, most often without the skin. I pick a prepared humus that is both low carb and with no saturated fat (there's a huge variety of humus available where I live, with a near equal variety of nutritional content; all taste better than my homemade stuff ). I like a lot of less fatty fish, so I eat that without a sauce. For snacks, I like a lot of lean turkey based stuff, like jerky, which usually has a negligible amount of fat of any kind. I do use butter and heavy cream for some recipes, but that usually doesn't result in much per serving, and I'm equally likely to use something like olive oil instead.

I know there are conflicting views on this here and in other low carb discussions. It is similar, IMO, to the disagreement with low carb diets in general in many sectors of the population, including the medical profession. I have zero interest in trying to justify what works for me to anyone else, be it low carb or avoiding saturated fat. If saturated fat is a concern for you, there are ways to eat LC and not include a large amount in your food choices. Hope you find some tasty options!
Alessandre is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2012, 04:45 PM   #9
Senior LCF Member
 
A'smommy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Dallas, TX
Posts: 583
Gallery: A'smommy
Stats: 144/129/120 5'5
WOE: My way, Lower carb, Low Calorie
Start Date: April 8th, 2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alessandre View Post
I don't eat a lot of saturated fat. For me, there are plenty of choices with less or no saturated fat that I enjoy. I eat a lot of chicken, most often without the skin. I pick a prepared humus that is both low carb and with no saturated fat (there's a huge variety of humus available where I live, with a near equal variety of nutritional content; all taste better than my homemade stuff ). I like a lot of less fatty fish, so I eat that without a sauce. For snacks, I like a lot of lean turkey based stuff, like jerky, which usually has a negligible amount of fat of any kind. I do use butter and heavy cream for some recipes, but that usually doesn't result in much per serving, and I'm equally likely to use something like olive oil instead.

I know there are conflicting views on this here and in other low carb discussions. It is similar, IMO, to the disagreement with low carb diets in general in many sectors of the population, including the medical profession. I have zero interest in trying to justify what works for me to anyone else, be it low carb or avoiding saturated fat. If saturated fat is a concern for you, there are ways to eat LC and not include a large amount in your food choices. Hope you find some tasty options!
Thank you, I completely agree. What works for me versus others is totally up to the individual person! I do enjoy hummus and completely forgot about that stuff! Will check it out next time i shop!
A'smommy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2012, 04:50 PM   #10
Very Gabby LCF Member!!!
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Las Vegas
Posts: 3,354
Gallery: steady
Stats: 110/95 5'2
WOE: ATKINS
Start Date: Feb 2007
Rather than olive oil for cooking, sauteeing or frying, try rice bran oil. I just don't believe saturated fats are so bad for you, but also don't believe they are so good for you either. I think its better to get fats from natural sources, and to diversify where those fats come from. I don't use much oil when cooking mostly to flavor- seed, nut and olive oils. I use butter and ghee to cook. Consider flax and chia seed for use in your lc diet.

Last edited by steady; 07-13-2012 at 04:57 PM..
steady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2012, 05:18 PM   #11
Very Gabby LCF Member!!!
 
jem51's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: south central OR
Posts: 3,645
Gallery: jem51
Stats: oh so happy at 120
WOE: Mine, all mine
Start Date: controlled carb '97-98
I love EVOO. It is my preferred fat and causes me no problems. I use it more than anything else....second is butter and sometime mixed w EVOO.

I also prefer full fat dairy but leaner meats. Meat fat gives me heartburn.

Last edited by jem51; 07-13-2012 at 05:24 PM..
jem51 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2012, 06:02 PM   #12
Major LCF Poster!
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Minneapolis
Posts: 2,923
Gallery: svenskamae
Stats: 235/178/135 5'3"
WOE: Nutritional Ketosis/Primal/JUDDD
Start Date: January 15, 2012
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alessandre View Post
I pick a prepared humus that is both low carb and with no saturated fat (there's a huge variety of humus available where I live, with a near equal variety of nutritional content; all taste better than my homemade stuff )
Sorry to take things a bit away from the original question, but what brand of hummus have you found that is low carb? What are the main ingredients?
Hummus used to be a staple of my diet, but I think of the usual main ingredient, garbanzo beans, as pretty high in carbs. Checking online, I find that hummus (brand unspecified) has about 3 carbs per Tablespoon, and I never ate just a Tablespoon of the stuff.

I've considered trying to make a lower carb version of hummus using black soybeans, which are the lowest carb legume that I know. But for now, I've switched to eating/making baba ganoush, which uses roasted eggplant (pureed with tahini, lemon juice, olive oil, and salt) instead of garbanzo beans. I'd be delighted to find another low-carb alternative to the standard hummus recipe, if you can suggest one.
svenskamae is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2012, 06:25 PM   #13
Senior LCF Member
 
Alessandre's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 266
Gallery: Alessandre
Stats: 200/169/112
WOE: Nutritional Ketosis
Start Date: June 2012
Quote:
Originally Posted by svenskamae View Post
Sorry to take things a bit away from the original question, but what brand of hummus have you found that is low carb? What are the main ingredients?
Hummus used to be a staple of my diet, but I think of the usual main ingredient, garbanzo beans, as pretty high in carbs. Checking online, I find that hummus (brand unspecified) has about 3 carbs per Tablespoon, and I never ate just a Tablespoon of the stuff.

I've considered trying to make a lower carb version of hummus using black soybeans, which are the lowest carb legume that I know. But for now, I've switched to eating/making baba ganoush, which uses roasted eggplant (pureed with tahini, lemon juice, olive oil, and salt) instead of garbanzo beans. I'd be delighted to find another low-carb alternative to the standard hummus recipe, if you can suggest one.
I eat a variety of hummus (hmmm, look at all the "m"s...I wonder where mine went to when I first posted). I usually use it as a dip with broccoli, which limits how much of it I will eat. I wish its carb count were even lower; if it had zero carbs, I would probably eat a container a day plain. Right now I have Sabra tahini hummus, with the 4 gm carbs per *two* tablespoons, with 1 gm of fiber and 0 gm of sugar. It also has 6 gm of fat (1 gm saturated) and 2 gm protein per serving. Sabra's Supremely Spicy, Roasted Pine Nut, and Classic versions all have the same carb count. The main ingredients in the tahini hummus are, in order on the label, garbanzos, water, tahini, and soybean and/or canola oil. Maybe it is the water and oil that cuts the carb content? I have no idea, and I do try to limit how much of it eat. But it is very tasty, and there's something about dipping [any food] into [any dip-like substance] that is satisfying to me.

I don't have any good hummus recipes, I'm afraid. I wish. The standard ones I have used don't taste as good as Sabra's, and I would be surprised if the carb counts were as low, much less lower. A better alternative would be great to find!

Last edited by Alessandre; 07-13-2012 at 06:27 PM..
Alessandre is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2012, 06:31 PM   #14
Senior LCF Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Central Florida
Posts: 231
Gallery: MiniMomma
Stats: 165.6/124.6/125
WOE: Medi 1-9-11
the medi-weightloss section has some good low fat/low carb recipes
MiniMomma is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2012, 08:21 PM   #15
Senior LCF Member
 
AngelMurray's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Southeast Texas
Posts: 64
Gallery: AngelMurray
Stats: 271/264/140
WOE: LC
Start Date: July 1, 2012
oh, I would love to eat some hummus!! Is it allowed on induction? Even if it isn't, just knowing I can eventually add it back into my meal plans makes me happy
AngelMurray is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2012, 08:44 PM   #16
Very Gabby LCF Member!!!
 
jem51's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: south central OR
Posts: 3,645
Gallery: jem51
Stats: oh so happy at 120
WOE: Mine, all mine
Start Date: controlled carb '97-98
South Beach allows beans.
jem51 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2012, 08:49 PM   #17
Major LCF Poster!
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Minneapolis
Posts: 2,923
Gallery: svenskamae
Stats: 235/178/135 5'3"
WOE: Nutritional Ketosis/Primal/JUDDD
Start Date: January 15, 2012
Quote:
Originally Posted by AngelMurray View Post
oh, I would love to eat some hummus!! Is it allowed on induction? Even if it isn't, just knowing I can eventually add it back into my meal plans makes me happy
I wouldn't eat hummus on induction, because legumes (including garbanzo beans) are not allowed on Atkins induction.

After induction, I guess it depends on how much self control you have in terms of portion size and how high or low you set your carb level. I'm embarrassed to admit that I used to treat a whole plastic container of hummus as a "serving" (together with pita bread for dipping in it.) I don't think that I can confine my portion size to a tablespoon or two, so I don't forsee eating hummus. But if you stop at just a tablespoon or two, I guess you could eventually incorporate hummus into your eating plan--so long as you keep track of the carbs and don't exceed your carb total for the day.

I find the taste of baba ganoush similar, but the bulk of that is supplied by eggplant, which is a lot lower in carbs than garbanzo beans. So I'm eating baba ganoush on flax crackers or as a dip with raw veggies as part of my lowcarb diet (Atkins OWL/primal).
svenskamae is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2012, 08:50 PM   #18
Senior LCF Member
 
gladee88er's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Goldfield, NV
Posts: 291
Gallery: gladee88er
Stats: 240 / 173.1 / 165
WOE: modified Atkins
Start Date: April 2011
Quote:
Originally Posted by svenskamae View Post
Avocados, nuts, and olive oil contain unsaturated fats.
These would be my first 3 replacement foods. You don't have a lot of weight to lose anyway, so you may have to watch overall calories a lot more than someone who has 100 pounds to lose. Until recently, I ate buckets of saturated fat, and my cholesterol dropped down to 160. I don't really want it to go any lower. In fact, my recent research has convinced me I should get it a little higher. Knowing what I know now, I would like to get it up to between 200-240.
gladee88er is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2012, 09:12 PM   #19
Way too much time on my hands!
 
metqa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Athens, GA
Posts: 12,740
Gallery: metqa
Stats: 147/136/125; 5'1"
WOE: PSMF/hcg Transitioning to HFLC
Start Date: joined LCF 2003: HCG/PSMF 07/2014
Saturated fats are in all animal fats and some fatty fruits like coconut oil and palm seed, but I thought pretty much all other non-animal non-tropical oils were low or free of sat fats.

Seems there should be lots of choices for low sat fat foods, if you just limit your meats to lean meats and eat vegetable sources of fats from seeds, nuts and non tropical fruits. Um Avocado I think is low in sat fat.
metqa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2012, 09:19 PM   #20
Way too much time on my hands!
 
metqa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Athens, GA
Posts: 12,740
Gallery: metqa
Stats: 147/136/125; 5'1"
WOE: PSMF/hcg Transitioning to HFLC
Start Date: joined LCF 2003: HCG/PSMF 07/2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abby View Post
I'm with you A'smommy, but you will NOT find many sympathetic listeners on this forum. Choosing monounsaturated fats like olive oil and nuts as well as Omega-3 polyunsaturated fats such as in fish is a MUCH healthier choice than saturated fats. I love sardines, tuna, salmon, shrimp, chicken, and turkey. Of course, white meats have saturated fat but at a much lower level than red meat.

Good Luck,
Kinda harsh..... I think most of the replies so far have been very sympathetic. I personally eat a lot of sat fats, but I can imagine someone wanting to watch something in their diet if it makes them uncomfortable. If she wants advice on low sat fats, I think we are able to accommodate her without too much trouble. Since she's not asking to be convinced, just asking for food list and ideas basically.
metqa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2012, 11:36 PM   #21
Senior LCF Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 748
Gallery: picklepete
You'll have to drop dairy first, that's usually the highest [non-coconut] saturate by percentage (even the fattiest steak is majority unsaturated). For what it's worth, I subject my unsaturates to greater scrutiny--more possibility of free radicals and trans fats depending on how it's prepared and heated.
picklepete is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-14-2012, 05:21 AM   #22
Way too much time on my hands!
 
metqa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Athens, GA
Posts: 12,740
Gallery: metqa
Stats: 147/136/125; 5'1"
WOE: PSMF/hcg Transitioning to HFLC
Start Date: joined LCF 2003: HCG/PSMF 07/2014
Quote:
(even the fattiest steak is majority unsaturated).
Oh yeah, I remember reading how once a steak is cooked most of the fat is the same as olive oil.
metqa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-14-2012, 07:53 AM   #23
Senior LCF Member
 
Alessandre's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 266
Gallery: Alessandre
Stats: 200/169/112
WOE: Nutritional Ketosis
Start Date: June 2012
Quote:
Originally Posted by metqa View Post
Oh yeah, I remember reading how once a steak is cooked most of the fat is the same as olive oil.
I hadn't hear that. After looking around for a while, I wish I could find it addressed by good, research-based nutritionist would address on a health-related site. I encountered too many problems with sub walls to feel like I got any solid answers. And I'm wary of information on non-research based sites that isn't backed up by multiple solid sources. There's too much poorly sourced information on nutrition out there, IMO.

Nearly everything I could find on the topic did show changes in the fat composition of cooked versus raw meat. But I found more studies that showed an increase in saturated fat and a decrease in unsaturated fat in cooked steak. To avoid copyright concerns, I will only paraphrase the conclusions. I only use quotes to make it slightly easier to read about the different studies.

Quote:
Effect of Cooking on the Fatty Acid Composition of Beef Intramuscular Lipid, Journal of Food Composition and Analysis; received 19 May 1998, revised 10 September 1998, Available online 6 May 2002.

The conclusion states that cooking increased the total saturated fat and decreased the total polyunsaturated fat content.
Quote:
From BeefExtension.Com (an industry-based research group): Effect of Cooking on the Lipid Composition of Beef Steaks (date unknown)

The conclusion found that cooking changed the saturated to unsaturated fatty acid ratio from 0.97 to 1.13, which represents a relative increase in saturated fat.
Quote:
Effect of Grilling and Roasting on Fatty Acid Methyl Esters in Beef and Pork, World Applied Sciences Journal 17: 25-28, 2012

The conclusion states that the ratio of polyunsaturated to saturated fatty acids in raw, grilled, and roasted beef was 0.03, 0.04, and 0.01, which would represent a tiny relative decrease in saturated fat in grilling and an even smaller increase with roasting. They found almost no change with raw, grilled, or roasted pork.
Quote:
Fatty Acids in Foods and Their Health Implications, Ching Kuang Chow, CRC Press, 2008 (A book available on Google Books)

According to the book, there is a relative increase in saturated fat in chicken when roasted. The discussion about beef is omitted from Google Books.
On and on and on....I looked mainly in Google Scholar with the search '"effect of cooking" meat composition fatty acid', refined by looking at related articles when I found something applicable. The same search in regular Google with "saturated" tacked on at the end pulled up many of the same articles and a lot of unrelated stuff.

This doesn't add up to much to me. I know I am not qualified to evaluate fully cutting-edge food composition articles, nor do I have adequate access to even read most of them. (Also, it is morning and I'm still suffering from the "can't have caffeine" rule, so who knows if my brain is awake. ) Unless I can see a lot of decent research supporting a claim about this either way, I guess I will decide that cooking may affect the fat composition of meat but not in a way that would significant change my intake.
Alessandre is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-14-2012, 09:14 PM   #24
Senior LCF Member
 
cleome's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Northern USA
Posts: 314
Gallery: cleome
Stats: 230/184/130
WOE: Metformin+LowCarb/HypothyroidHealth
Start Date: September 2009
A Heart-Healthy Porterhouse Steak?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alessandre View Post
I hadn't hear that. After looking around for a while, I wish I could find it addressed by good, research-based nutritionist would address on a health-related site.
The USDA has a pretty good site for checking nutrient info: NDL/FNIC Food Composition Database Home Page i.e. compare raw vs cooked states of the same item. I don't think that Metqa meant to say that heating meat per se within normal cooking ranges will cause any huge differences in the fat types, just saying what was present in cooked meat.

Gary Taubes presents information regarding fat content, along with implications for heart health for a cooked porterhouse steak on pp 168-9 in his book "Good Calories Bad Calories" -- HIGHLY RECOMMENDED reference.

A Heart-Healthy Porterhouse Steak? paraphrases GCBC as follows:

"Saturated fat raises LDL, but also raises HDL, resulting in a net neutral effect. Mono-unsaturated fat both raises HDL and lowers LDL, for a double-acting benefit. Poly-unsaturated fat has no effect on HDL, but lowers LDL, also resulting in an overall beneficial effect...

"Taubes applies the above results to a big, fat porterhouse steak with a 1/4-inch layer of fat (before cooking). After broiling, the steak consists of about half protein and half fat. What is the predicted overall effect of this supposedly risky dining choice on your HDL and LDL cholesterol, and hence your risk of heart disease?

51% Mono-Unsaturated Fat, 9/10 is oleic acid ('oleic' as in 'olive' oil)
15% Saturated Fat - stearic acid (metabolizes to oleic acid)
30% Saturated Fat (other than stearic acid)
4% Poly-Unsaturated Fat

"Up to 70% of the fat in a porterhouse steak improves the HDL/LDL ratio, and the remaining 30% of the fat does no harm to the HDL/LDL ratio, implying that eating a porterhouse steak rather than bread or potatoes would reduce heart-disease risk. Taubes points out that the same conclusion holds for lard and bacon."

Last edited by cleome; 07-14-2012 at 09:17 PM..
cleome is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-14-2012, 09:37 PM   #25
Major LCF Poster!
 
tiva's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: UP, Michigan
Posts: 2,938
Gallery: tiva
Stats: 5"6", 157/136/135, 53 yo
WOE: Paleo/Whole30
Start Date: 12/02
If you're interested in research, the best scientific meta-analysis of peer-reviewed, controlled research studies show zero longevity benefits to reducing saturated fats: Saturated Fat and Cardiometabolic Risk Factors, Coronary Heart Disease, Stroke, and Diabetes: a Fresh Look at the Evidence. There's a very slight reduction in chronic heart disease risk, but no effect on mortality or longevity found in any studies. Huge numbers of studies have been done trying to show effects, and they simply don't exist.

I'm a scientist. This is an excellent study, published in the best journal in its field. It's evidence that reducing saturated fats has no detectable benefits for most people. If you don't like their taste, by all means find substitutes.

Last edited by tiva; 07-14-2012 at 09:39 PM..
tiva is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-14-2012, 11:37 PM   #26
Senior LCF Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 748
Gallery: picklepete
Quote:
Originally Posted by tiva View Post
There's a very slight reduction in chronic heart disease risk, but no effect on mortality or longevity found in any studies. Huge numbers of studies have been done trying to show effects, and they simply don't exist.
This is why I always skim science articles to see if it's reporting on an observation or an experiment. I lost count of how many health articles warned us away from saturated fat by saying "scientists have long known that people who report eating foods containing saturated fat such as pizza, ice cream, and pastries tend to suffer more diseases"

You don't say!
picklepete is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 03:56 AM.


Copyright ©1999-2014 Friends Forums LLC. All rights reserved. - Terms of Service | Privacy Policy
LowCarbFriends® is a registered mark of Friends Forums, LLC.