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Old 01-18-2012, 05:08 PM   #1
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Is one of my favorite low-carb foods, black olives, a frankenfood?????????

Ever since I've gone low-carb I've eaten a half dozen black olives per day on my salad.

I have been reading a lot about the plastic lining inside of cans containing Bisphenol A (BPA) which isn't supposed to be good for you.

From the Mayo Clinic:
...the National Toxicology Program at the Department of Health and Human Services says it has "some concern" about the possible health effects of BPA on the brain, behavior and prostate gland of fetuses, infants and children. This level of concern is midway on its five-level scale, which ranges from serious to negligible. The Food and Drug Administration now shares this level of concern and is taking steps to reduce human exposure to BPA in the food supply by finding alternatives to BPA in food containers. ...

And a lot of other sites are much more severe. The Mayo is about as friendly to BPA as the negative sites get.

From Scientific American Magazine:Link
...Since at least 1936 it has been known that BPA mimics estrogens, binding to the same receptors throughout the human body as natural female hormones. And tests have shown that the chemical can promote human breast cancer cell growth as well as decrease sperm count in rats, among other effects. These findings have raised questions about the potential health risks of BPA, especially in the wake of hosts of studies showing that it leaches from plastics and resins when they are exposed to hard use or high temperatures (as in microwaves or dishwashers).

I have a brain and a prostate so perhaps I should limit the BPA. One of the things the Mayo Clinic recommends is to reduced the use of canned foods.

So I started wondering why do Black Olives come in cans when Green Olives come in jars. So I googled it and found pretty much universal agreement on this:

So: what is the artificial ripening process that makes it necessary to can canned olives? I spoke to Rosemarie Fusano of the Fusano Olive Company and she gave me the rundown:

Once harvested, [the olives] are placed in a water/lye solution in a holding tank where oxygen is piped in. After 24 to 48 hours the lye is washed away and the olives have turned black from the addition of oxygen. The purpose of the lye is to penetrate the fruit almost down to the pit. This makes the olive edible right from the start. Once the lye is washed away, a fresh brine solution is prepared and ferrous gluconate is added, which sets the color. The olives are then ready to be canned. A light brine solution is prepared and added to the olives in the can. Because the olives are then in an anaerobic environment, the chance of botulism developing is great. Therefore, the fruit must be cooked in cans for a certain amount of time.

So you can't process artificially ripened olives in jars – the glass wouldn't withstand the cooking temperature.


So commercial black olives aren't really ripe olives after all. They are processed green olives made to look and taste like they are ripe.

The ferrous gluconate isn't anything I worry about but what about the lye and the BPA?

And they are cooking the olives in the BPA lined cans. Hmmmmmm.

So sadly, I am going to err on the side of caution and I'll quit buying canned olives. Too bad I don't care for the green ones

Bobby
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Old 01-18-2012, 05:57 PM   #2
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Wow, I never even though to question why black olives only come in cans and green olives in jars.... I also assumed black olives were a different type of olive, not processed to become black. So here I am, showing my ignorance on the matter.

I used to only love green olives as a kid, and the black ones later became an acquired taste.
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Old 01-18-2012, 06:25 PM   #3
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Oh that is a shame!! I love black olives too but they are sold in jars in the uk. Could you not get some from a reputable online supplier in jars?
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Old 01-18-2012, 07:17 PM   #4
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I buy big glass jars of (black) Calamata olives at Costco. Not sure how they COOK them but I do know they come packed in glass!
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Old 01-18-2012, 08:15 PM   #5
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You can cook in glass (It would probably take a higher temperature then a can would) and I remember people canning, using canning jars, ripe olives. They weren't black, but tasted like black olives.
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Old 01-18-2012, 08:20 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobby_Boomer View Post
Ever since I've gone low-carb I've eaten a half dozen black olives per day on my salad.

I have been reading a lot about the plastic lining inside of cans containing Bisphenol A (BPA) which isn't supposed to be good for you.

From the Mayo Clinic:
...the National Toxicology Program at the Department of Health and Human Services says it has "some concern" about the possible health effects of BPA on the brain, behavior and prostate gland of fetuses, infants and children. This level of concern is midway on its five-level scale, which ranges from serious to negligible. The Food and Drug Administration now shares this level of concern and is taking steps to reduce human exposure to BPA in the food supply by finding alternatives to BPA in food containers. ...

And a lot of other sites are much more severe. The Mayo is about as friendly to BPA as the negative sites get.

From Scientific American Magazine:Link
...Since at least 1936 it has been known that BPA mimics estrogens, binding to the same receptors throughout the human body as natural female hormones. And tests have shown that the chemical can promote human breast cancer cell growth as well as decrease sperm count in rats, among other effects. These findings have raised questions about the potential health risks of BPA, especially in the wake of hosts of studies showing that it leaches from plastics and resins when they are exposed to hard use or high temperatures (as in microwaves or dishwashers).

I have a brain and a prostate so perhaps I should limit the BPA. One of the things the Mayo Clinic recommends is to reduced the use of canned foods.

So I started wondering why do Black Olives come in cans when Green Olives come in jars. So I googled it and found pretty much universal agreement on this:

So: what is the artificial ripening process that makes it necessary to can canned olives? I spoke to Rosemarie Fusano of the Fusano Olive Company and she gave me the rundown:

Once harvested, [the olives] are placed in a water/lye solution in a holding tank where oxygen is piped in. After 24 to 48 hours the lye is washed away and the olives have turned black from the addition of oxygen. The purpose of the lye is to penetrate the fruit almost down to the pit. This makes the olive edible right from the start. Once the lye is washed away, a fresh brine solution is prepared and ferrous gluconate is added, which sets the color. The olives are then ready to be canned. A light brine solution is prepared and added to the olives in the can. Because the olives are then in an anaerobic environment, the chance of botulism developing is great. Therefore, the fruit must be cooked in cans for a certain amount of time.

So you can't process artificially ripened olives in jars – the glass wouldn't withstand the cooking temperature.


So commercial black olives aren't really ripe olives after all. They are processed green olives made to look and taste like they are ripe.

The ferrous gluconate isn't anything I worry about but what about the lye and the BPA?

And they are cooking the olives in the BPA lined cans. Hmmmmmm.

So sadly, I am going to err on the side of caution and I'll quit buying canned olives. Too bad I don't care for the green ones

Bobby
You can pass your black olives to me. I've been eating them for nearly 7 decades. They're one of my favorites. Hope they haven't been doing me great damage all this time, but I'll be the guinea pig for science and eat your share too.
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Old 01-18-2012, 08:26 PM   #7
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BPA is indeed a major endocrine disruptor and well worth avoiding, particularly if you're of child-bearing age (I'm a scientist and I research EDs. Fetal development is particularly vulnerable to the hormonal effects of BPA. Obesity and metabolic syndrome have also been correlated with BPA levels in humans. Many lab experiments show that BPA can increase the risk of obesity and diabetes in laboratory animals.)

You can certainly buy black olives in glass jars. Tomato sauce is another food which is good to buy in glass, because the acids in tomatos seem to make more of the BPA in the linings migrate to the food and then to you.
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Old 01-18-2012, 08:32 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobby_Boomer View Post
Ever since I've gone low-carb I've eaten a half dozen black olives per day on my salad.

I have been reading a lot about the plastic lining inside of cans containing Bisphenol A (BPA) which isn't supposed to be good for you.

From the Mayo Clinic:
...the National Toxicology Program at the Department of Health and Human Services says it has "some concern" about the possible health effects of BPA on the brain, behavior and prostate gland of fetuses, infants and children. This level of concern is midway on its five-level scale, which ranges from serious to negligible. The Food and Drug Administration now shares this level of concern and is taking steps to reduce human exposure to BPA in the food supply by finding alternatives to BPA in food containers. ...

And a lot of other sites are much more severe. The Mayo is about as friendly to BPA as the negative sites get.

From Scientific American Magazine:Link
...Since at least 1936 it has been known that BPA mimics estrogens, binding to the same receptors throughout the human body as natural female hormones. And tests have shown that the chemical can promote human breast cancer cell growth as well as decrease sperm count in rats, among other effects. These findings have raised questions about the potential health risks of BPA, especially in the wake of hosts of studies showing that it leaches from plastics and resins when they are exposed to hard use or high temperatures (as in microwaves or dishwashers).

I have a brain and a prostate so perhaps I should limit the BPA. One of the things the Mayo Clinic recommends is to reduced the use of canned foods.

So I started wondering why do Black Olives come in cans when Green Olives come in jars. So I googled it and found pretty much universal agreement on this:

So: what is the artificial ripening process that makes it necessary to can canned olives? I spoke to Rosemarie Fusano of the Fusano Olive Company and she gave me the rundown:

Once harvested, [the olives] are placed in a water/lye solution in a holding tank where oxygen is piped in. After 24 to 48 hours the lye is washed away and the olives have turned black from the addition of oxygen. The purpose of the lye is to penetrate the fruit almost down to the pit. This makes the olive edible right from the start. Once the lye is washed away, a fresh brine solution is prepared and ferrous gluconate is added, which sets the color. The olives are then ready to be canned. A light brine solution is prepared and added to the olives in the can. Because the olives are then in an anaerobic environment, the chance of botulism developing is great. Therefore, the fruit must be cooked in cans for a certain amount of time.

So you can't process artificially ripened olives in jars – the glass wouldn't withstand the cooking temperature.


So commercial black olives aren't really ripe olives after all. They are processed green olives made to look and taste like they are ripe.

The ferrous gluconate isn't anything I worry about but what about the lye and the BPA?

And they are cooking the olives in the BPA lined cans. Hmmmmmm.

So sadly, I am going to err on the side of caution and I'll quit buying canned olives. Too bad I don't care for the green ones

Bobby
OMG! I have been eating black olives in my daily salad for lunch, I never knew this about black olives. I will start buying the green ones that come in a jar next time. Thanks for the info.
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Old 01-19-2012, 03:06 AM   #9
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The absolute WORST thing you can buy in a can is tomatoes because the acidity really leeches the BPA from the cans. I used a lot of canned diced tomatoes and an looking for an alternative.

I did not know this about black olives. Thank you so much for sharing.
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Old 01-19-2012, 04:51 AM   #10
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Most of my grocery stores have an olive bar. Can you buy them like that instead?
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Old 01-19-2012, 07:08 AM   #11
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I'll look for black olives in jars at my local stores. I've been buying them by the 6-pack at BJ's ("wholesale" club) and that's all they offer.

I'll look in Publix.

I've seen them in jars on the 'net, but by the time I add shipping expenses, it get a little costly.

I absolutely love ripe olives, I don't care for the greens though.

Bobby
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Old 01-19-2012, 08:29 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Charski View Post
I buy big glass jars of (black) Calamata olives at Costco. Not sure how they COOK them but I do know they come packed in glass!
Quote:
Originally Posted by tcalhoun72 View Post
Most of my grocery stores have an olive bar. Can you buy them like that instead?
The Calamata olives and the olives sold at the olive bar are not the same as the black olives sold in a can. I've never seen the canned kind in anything but the cans.

I love all kinds of olives. I have to search all different areas of the grocery store because they put the types of olives that comes in jars in all different areas of the store to compare prices. It is very frustrating to search the whole store for the best prices, but in all my searched I have never discovered the regular black olives you find in cans packaged in jars.
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Old 01-19-2012, 10:06 AM   #13
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See how much I know about olives? lol I only eat chopped black olives if they show up on my pizza.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Karerose View Post
The Calamata olives and the olives sold at the olive bar are not the same as the black olives sold in a can. I've never seen the canned kind in anything but the cans.

I love all kinds of olives. I have to search all different areas of the grocery store because they put the types of olives that comes in jars in all different areas of the store to compare prices. It is very frustrating to search the whole store for the best prices, but in all my searched I have never discovered the regular black olives you find in cans packaged in jars.
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Old 01-19-2012, 10:37 AM   #14
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just don't buy them in cans.

jars, plastic containers, etc are your best bet. Love & Profits: FLATFERENGHI
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Old 01-20-2012, 08:09 AM   #15
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So does anyone know where there is a list of every type of packaging that contains BPA? I googled it with mediocre results.

Thanks
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Old 01-20-2012, 09:31 AM   #16
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BPA is indeed a major endocrine disruptor and well worth avoiding, particularly if you're of child-bearing age (I'm a scientist and I research EDs. Fetal development is particularly vulnerable to the hormonal effects of BPA. Obesity and metabolic syndrome have also been correlated with BPA levels in humans. Many lab experiments show that BPA can increase the risk of obesity and diabetes in laboratory animals.)

You can certainly buy black olives in glass jars. Tomato sauce is another food which is good to buy in glass, because the acids in tomatos seem to make more of the BPA in the linings migrate to the food and then to you.
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Old 01-22-2012, 08:57 AM   #17
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I also recommend buying olives from the olive bar. So many yummy varieties - different sizes, colors, flavors. I buy mine from a store that lists everything in the olives above each type of olive on the bar. I eat olive bar olives several times per week.
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Old 01-22-2012, 09:10 AM   #18
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The absolute WORST thing you can buy in a can is tomatoes because the acidity really leeches the BPA from the cans. I used a lot of canned diced tomatoes and an looking for an alternative.

I did not know this about black olives. Thank you so much for sharing.
Look for them in tetra paks. I can get them here - they are imported from Italy. They come in chopped and strained.


Last edited by clackley; 01-22-2012 at 09:11 AM..
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Old 01-22-2012, 09:16 AM   #19
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Look for them in tetra paks. I can get them here - they are imported from Italy. They come in chopped and strained.

Those tomatoes taste great too! I either use them or may buy fresh tomatoes and cook them myself.
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Old 01-22-2012, 10:24 AM   #20
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I often wonder about the b.p.a. leaching from coffee makers which almost always have cones made of plastic or boiling water in those plastic electric kettles. Anyone know what the answer is to this?
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Old 01-22-2012, 10:48 AM   #21
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I often wonder about the b.p.a. leaching from coffee makers which almost always have cones made of plastic or boiling water in those plastic electric kettles. Anyone know what the answer is to this?
French press.
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Old 01-22-2012, 11:51 AM   #22
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For coffee, I have ceramic one-cup Melita type coffee makers. One for me and one for my DW. It makes a cup of coffee in a minute or less, almost as fast as instant, and much, much better.



I found black olives in jars today, but they were oily, and soft. Not very appetizing.

Oh well, another favorite food crossed off the list. How sad.

Bobby

Last edited by Bobby_Boomer; 01-22-2012 at 11:53 AM..
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Old 01-22-2012, 11:51 AM   #23
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Oh sadness!

I LOVE black olives, but LYE? ACK! i think I'll start hitting up the olive bar from now on!
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Old 01-22-2012, 11:54 AM   #24
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So what makes you think the olives at the olive bar didn't get treated with lye and come in a can before they were put on the bar?
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Old 01-22-2012, 12:43 PM   #25
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So what makes you think the olives at the olive bar didn't get treated with lye and come in a can before they were put on the bar?
This was exactly my thought, I'm sure grocery stores or wherever this olive bars are are just dumping the olives from the can, jar or whatever container into the serving dishes!

They rinse the lye off, if there was lye left on the olives it would eat through your tongue!!!

I love people whe say they would never use soap made with lye, not knowing that ALL soap is made with lye then the chemical reaction that happens with the lye, water, oils, heat and time burns off all the lye making the soap safe to use on your skin.
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Old 01-22-2012, 12:48 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by Bobby_Boomer View Post
Ever since I've gone low-carb I've eaten a half dozen black olives per day on my salad.

I have been reading a lot about the plastic lining inside of cans containing Bisphenol A (BPA) which isn't supposed to be good for you.

From the Mayo Clinic:
...the National Toxicology Program at the Department of Health and Human Services says it has "some concern" about the possible health effects of BPA on the brain, behavior and prostate gland of fetuses, infants and children. This level of concern is midway on its five-level scale, which ranges from serious to negligible. The Food and Drug Administration now shares this level of concern and is taking steps to reduce human exposure to BPA in the food supply by finding alternatives to BPA in food containers. ...

And a lot of other sites are much more severe. The Mayo is about as friendly to BPA as the negative sites get.

From Scientific American Magazine:Link
...Since at least 1936 it has been known that BPA mimics estrogens, binding to the same receptors throughout the human body as natural female hormones. And tests have shown that the chemical can promote human breast cancer cell growth as well as decrease sperm count in rats, among other effects. These findings have raised questions about the potential health risks of BPA, especially in the wake of hosts of studies showing that it leaches from plastics and resins when they are exposed to hard use or high temperatures (as in microwaves or dishwashers).

I have a brain and a prostate so perhaps I should limit the BPA. One of the things the Mayo Clinic recommends is to reduced the use of canned foods.

So I started wondering why do Black Olives come in cans when Green Olives come in jars. So I googled it and found pretty much universal agreement on this:

So: what is the artificial ripening process that makes it necessary to can canned olives? I spoke to Rosemarie Fusano of the Fusano Olive Company and she gave me the rundown:

Once harvested, [the olives] are placed in a water/lye solution in a holding tank where oxygen is piped in. After 24 to 48 hours the lye is washed away and the olives have turned black from the addition of oxygen. The purpose of the lye is to penetrate the fruit almost down to the pit. This makes the olive edible right from the start. Once the lye is washed away, a fresh brine solution is prepared and ferrous gluconate is added, which sets the color. The olives are then ready to be canned. A light brine solution is prepared and added to the olives in the can. Because the olives are then in an anaerobic environment, the chance of botulism developing is great. Therefore, the fruit must be cooked in cans for a certain amount of time.

So you can't process artificially ripened olives in jars – the glass wouldn't withstand the cooking temperature.


So commercial black olives aren't really ripe olives after all. They are processed green olives made to look and taste like they are ripe.

The ferrous gluconate isn't anything I worry about but what about the lye and the BPA?

And they are cooking the olives in the BPA lined cans. Hmmmmmm.

So sadly, I am going to err on the side of caution and I'll quit buying canned olives. Too bad I don't care for the green ones

Bobby
Ferrous Gluconate is just iron, the lye solution is not dangerous as it is washed off, but the BPA could be a concern, it would concern me.
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Old 01-22-2012, 02:57 PM   #27
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BPA is indeed a major endocrine disruptor and well worth avoiding, particularly if you're of child-bearing age (I'm a scientist and I research EDs. Fetal development is particularly vulnerable to the hormonal effects of BPA. Obesity and metabolic syndrome have also been correlated with BPA levels in humans. Many lab experiments show that BPA can increase the risk of obesity and diabetes in laboratory animals.)

You can certainly buy black olives in glass jars. Tomato sauce is another food which is good to buy in glass, because the acids in tomatos seem to make more of the BPA in the linings migrate to the food and then to you.
Thanks for this info.
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Old 01-22-2012, 02:58 PM   #28
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I have been using the very same coffee method!!
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Old 01-22-2012, 05:39 PM   #29
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Originally Posted by Bobby_Boomer View Post
So what makes you think the olives at the olive bar didn't get treated with lye and come in a can before they were put on the bar?
Exactly that. ^

I just eat them. Maybe they'll eventually kill me.
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Old 01-22-2012, 06:11 PM   #30
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Originally Posted by SoHappy View Post
Exactly that. ^

I just eat them. Maybe they'll eventually kill me.
But you'll die happy!
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