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Old 12-29-2011, 10:21 AM   #1
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New York Times article

Here is an article from the New York Times Magazine which I copied from a FB page: http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/01/ma...2&pagewanted=1

The article is titled the "Fat Trap" in case the link doesn't work. It talks about a lot of things that have come up on LCF recently: leptin, ghrelin (sp?), genetics and obesity; long stalls; harder to lose weight the 2 or 3 time around.

Like several other people, I've been stalled for 6 months - after losing 42 pounds between Sept 2010 and June 2011. This article talks about how hard your body fights to have you regain the weight lost - hormones change, calories burned through exercise seriously diminish - so I'm going to concentrate for now in maintaining my weight loss.

It's kind of a long read, but certainly gives me a lot to think about.
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Old 12-29-2011, 10:55 AM   #2
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subbing - still have to read the article...
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Old 12-29-2011, 11:59 AM   #3
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I am convinced I have all these same "things against me" as are described in the article and i struggled my entire life - but am maintaining 91 pounds of my 108 loss for 7+ years, and the total of 108 for something like 2 of those years (I yo-yoed on those tough last pounds for a while).

It is nice to know they are researching why and how some of us have a propensity to put on weight. As much as it is good to know that I may have had more strikes against me that led me to 38 years of lifetime obesity and have a really awful propensity to put it back on, my preference is not to dwell on that. Rather, I choose to work hard and bust my butt to keep it off despite all the strikes against me - and it **can** be extremely challenging at times.

I think personal effort in finding out what each of you need to do to keep the weight off is the best way to spend your energy and drive. We are NOT doomed to be fat. We need to take this information and let it drive home the seriousness of how hard it will be once you get to that magic number that is goal weight - and let it drive home that you may need to do distasteful things like exercise to increase lean body mass and calorie-burning potential, do like OP and try to maintain a higher goal weight for a while, etc. Lowcarb, very low carb, paleo, atkins, etc etc etc are tools, not magical cure-alls ..

lol, apologies for the long post, but we are only victims of our physiology if we allow ourselves to wallow in the "unfairness" and we let these kinds of research serve as excuses rather than fuel our fire and desire to do this thing! You can all do this! Believe it!



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Old 12-29-2011, 12:55 PM   #4
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Mobear, thank you for sharing the NYT article. I had heard of this piece of research when it first came out. It is true that 'maintaining weight loss' is more challenging than we once thought but it certainly makes a lot of sense. I agree that I am very happy to have lost 55 lbs. over a year ago and still maintain that loss.

From the NYT's article, I would like to comment....this is in reference to the people who have joined a registry to track their maintenance... I believe my differences are due to my l/c woe.

1. Registry members exercise about an hour or more each day — the average weight-loser puts in the equivalent of a four-mile daily walk, seven days a week. FALSE - I walk daily but more like 1/2 hour

2. They get on a scale every day in order to keep their weight within a narrow range. TRUE - daily weighing keeps me on track.

3. They eat breakfast regularly. FALSE - I rarely eat breakfast.

4. Most watch less than half as much television as the overall population. FALSE - I freely admit I am a tv addict.

5. They eat the same foods and in the same patterns consistently each day FALSE - I intermittent fast, intermittently and I change up my menu all the time.

6. Don’t “cheat” on weekends or holidays. TRUE - I am very compliant mostly because I see no reason to do otherwise.

7. They also appear to eat less than most people, with estimates ranging from 50 to 300 fewer daily calories. TRUE - I have had good opportunity to see what my sibs and their mates eat regularly because we travel together for weeks at a time and I can tell you, 100%, that I eat a lot less than all of them (and that is 10 people that are very close in age to me).

Less than 50% of this paragraph on 'maintainance' is true in my case (and if that is what I am actually doing - I like to think I was trying to lose ).
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Old 12-29-2011, 12:58 PM   #5
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YES, to TaDa's wonderful post! I agree totally.

I was morbidly obese my entire life, and I am determined not to regain any weight. Is it easy? No. But I won't think of myself as a 'victim' of my genes (my entire family is obese) or my physiology. I lost the weight with a lot of hard work, and I intend to keep it off the same way.

Personally, I think that a lot of people regain their weight because they see their 'goal weight' as the end of the process. And without realizing it, they return to the bad habits that caused the gain in the first place.

I've learned that 'weight management' is a lifetime process for me, and 'maintenance' has challenges of its own. In some ways, it's even more difficult than weight loss--at least it is for me.

My motto has been "Eternal vigilance is the price of maintenance," but I am so happy with my current weight, clothing size, and health that the vigilance is worth it--absolutely worth it.
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Old 12-29-2011, 01:00 PM   #6
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Pauline, great post as usual!

I would like to comment that most people don't know the uphill battle they face in losing weight and keeping it off. As the saying goes, knowledge is power.
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Old 12-29-2011, 01:54 PM   #7
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I thought the tone of the article was very discouraging, but I attribute that to the author's apparent belief that "fatty" foods make a person fat. If I were still eating low-fat, low-calorie, I'd still be fat, too.
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Old 12-29-2011, 02:15 PM   #8
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Pauline and Leo, thank you very much for your thoughtful posts. I find them inspiring.

I find that maintenance requires an attention and diligence that is far different from thinking, "I'll just eat this way for a while and lose some weight." I am currently looking at it as walking more of the middle way, than having to be on the razor's edge all the time. I read, experiment, wait, indulge a little, take time to say "no" to indulgences, and continue going forward.

Here is the link to the study referred to in the newspaper article.

...
BACKGROUND
After weight loss, changes in the circulating levels of several peripheral hormones involved in the homeostatic regulation of body weight occur. Whether these changes are transient or persist over time may be important for an understanding of the reasons behind the high rate of weight regain after diet-induced weight loss.

METHODS
We enrolled 50 overweight or obese patients without diabetes in a 10-week weight-loss program for which a very-low-energy diet was prescribed. At baseline (before weight loss), at 10 weeks (after program completion), and at 62 weeks, we examined circulating levels of leptin, ghrelin, peptide YY, gastric inhibitory polypeptide, glucagon-like peptide 1, amylin, pancreatic polypeptide, cholecystokinin, and insulin and subjective ratings of appetite.

RESULTS
Weight loss (mean [±SE], 13.5±0.5 kg) led to significant reductions in levels of leptin, peptide YY, cholecystokinin, insulin (P<0.001 for all comparisons), and amylin (P=0.002) and to increases in levels of ghrelin (P<0.001), gastric inhibitory polypeptide (P=0.004), and pancreatic polypeptide (P=0.008). There was also a significant increase in subjective appetite (P<0.001). One year after the initial weight loss, there were still significant differences from baseline in the mean levels of leptin (P<0.001), peptide YY (P<0.001), cholecystokinin (P=0.04), insulin (P=0.01), ghrelin (P<0.001), gastric inhibitory polypeptide (P<0.001), and pancreatic polypeptide (P=0.002), as well as hunger (P<0.001).

CONCLUSIONS
One year after initial weight reduction, levels of the circulating mediators of appetite that encourage weight regain after diet-induced weight loss do not revert to the levels recorded before weight loss. Long-term strategies to counteract this change may be needed to prevent obesity relapse.
...
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Old 12-29-2011, 02:51 PM   #9
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We enrolled 50 overweight or obese patients without diabetes in a 10-week weight-loss program for which a very-low-energy diet was prescribed.
IF this is the same study I was reading about on another blog, the "very low energy diet" was 500 to 800 calories a day. That's not a diet, that's starvation!

Low calorie levels like that cause the body to burn up it's own muscle to keep homeostasis. So I don't think that we can draw conclusions that apply to people who eat a healthy low carb diet with sufficient protein, fat and daily calories to lose weight.

I think those people's bodies were desparate to hold on to calories and avoid the famine those calorie restrictions, their horomones were in a turmoil that lasted long after the starvation component was over. Comparing that to us is like comparing apples to bicycles.
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Old 12-30-2011, 06:50 AM   #10
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IF this is the same study I was reading about on another blog, the "very low energy diet" was 500 to 800 calories a day. That's not a diet, that's starvation!

Low calorie levels like that cause the body to burn up it's own muscle to keep homeostasis. So I don't think that we can draw conclusions that apply to people who eat a healthy low carb diet with sufficient protein, fat and daily calories to lose weight.

I think those people's bodies were desparate to hold on to calories and avoid the famine those calorie restrictions, their horomones were in a turmoil that lasted long after the starvation component was over. Comparing that to us is like comparing apples to bicycles.
I do think this is the same study you are referring to (very low calorie) and I agree that it is starvation but I am not sure that would impact the findings 1 year later.

I do think that eating a low carb woe probably has some benefits in terms of maintenance but with any weight loss (no matter the method), it will be a struggle to maintain for the reasons the study points out.
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Old 12-30-2011, 07:01 AM   #11
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Well, if only losing it were not feeling IMPOSSIBLE, then I'd worry about how to keep it off once I got it off. I disagree in some ways with what several people have said, because what can you do if you are, for example, extremely insulin resistant!? You can eat VLC and exercise to your hearts content, but if your body has to produce four times the insulin that a normal person would to deal with your low carb diet, how is that NOT being a 'victim of your genes'?

I wish there were an easy answer. Unfortunately there is NOT. Weight loss is easier for some people than for others.

Sometimes it feels like an impossible battle.
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Old 12-30-2011, 07:05 AM   #12
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Well, if only losing it were not feeling IMPOSSIBLE, then I'd worry about how to keep it off once I got it off. I disagree in some ways with what several people have said, because what can you do if you are, for example, extremely insulin resistant!? You can eat VLC and exercise to your hearts content, but if your body has to produce four times the insulin that a normal person would to deal with your low carb diet, how is that NOT being a 'victim of your genes'?

I wish there were an easy answer. Unfortunately there is NOT. Weight loss is easier for some people than for others.

Sometimes it feels like an impossible battle.
I agree. Here is another example - what if your thyroid has tanked but due to circumstances beyond a person's control, they can't get it diagnosed. There are a lot of reasons for weight gain that don't include eating too much and not exercising enough.
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Old 12-30-2011, 07:08 AM   #13
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I agree. Here is another example - what if your thyroid has tanked but due to circumstances beyond a person's control, they can't get it diagnosed. There are a lot of reasons for weight gain that don't include eating too much and not exercising enough.
Exactly!! To imply that it takes the same amount of effort for everyone is to, once again, bring moral judgement into the picture. Not that I am accusing anyone on this thread of doing that! I just think the reality of weight loss is far more complicated and individual than anyone can quickly sum up. And some people have inherited distinct advantages and disadvantages.
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Old 12-30-2011, 07:12 AM   #14
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Just as it's not helpful to feel sorry for yourself because maintenance is challenging, it's also not very helpful to feel sorry for yourself because weight loss is difficult.

I lost 200 lbs post-menopausal and hypothyroid, losing the first 60 lbs while trying to get diagnosed (severe symptoms, no meds). My endo believes that I also have a genetically slow metabolism.

I know from having done Atkins that my CCL is barely 25g, so I always must eat very low carb. Because of age and hypothyroid, I also have to severely restrict calories.

Yet I lost and am maintaining, after a lifetime of morbid obesity.

Was it easy? Of course not. But I didn't dwell on the difficulty; I focused on solving the 'problem' of losing weight.

Now I am focused on solving the problem of maintenance.

As in all things in life, we have to deal with the reality that confronts us. It doesn't do any good to wish it were otherwise.
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Old 12-30-2011, 07:19 AM   #15
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I thought it was an excellent article, even though some of the details are not particularly appropriate for LCing. The major point--that keeping weight off is a lot harder than losing it, and takes as much attention as weight loss--is certainly true for me. I've kept nearly all my lost weight off for 9 years, but only because I obsess about it, with daily weigh-ins, daily tracking of each and every bite, daily exercise, and a continued commitment to LC for the rest of my life.

The key insight of the article for me: hormones and metabolism both matter a LOT more than how many calories you think you're eating. We all know this, but it's good to be reminded about it. One person can eat half as much food as their friend, and still gain weight while the friend loses. Calories alone don't tell us why.

The article unfortunately didn't discuss epigenetics and their effects on weight loss and gain. A great deal of emerging research in epigenetics (my research field, on toxins, not on human weight) shows that fetal events have powerful effects on adult health.

Genes alone don't determine what happens to you as an adult. Which genes get turned on and which genes get turned off have an even greater effect (epigenetics essentially means which of your genes get expressed and which don't, and that's shaped by environmental exposures, particularly during fetal and early childhood development). So a child who was nutritionally deprived during fetal and early childhood development has genes turned on that will make her much more likely to gain weight as an adult.

The important insight of epigenetics is that while we cannot control our own genome, we do have some influence over our epigenome. We can reshape the factors that turn on and off genes, by paying close attention to nutrition, hormones, and stress (all of which affect the attachment and detachment of methyl groups to genes, which in turn tell them to turn on or off).
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Old 12-30-2011, 07:48 AM   #16
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Just as it's not helpful to feel sorry for yourself because maintenance is challenging, it's also not very helpful to feel sorry for yourself because weight loss is difficult.

I lost 200 lbs post-menopausal and hypothyroid, losing the first 60 lbs while trying to get diagnosed (severe symptoms, no meds). My endo believes that I also have a genetically slow metabolism.

I know from having done Atkins that my CCL is barely 25g, so I always must eat very low carb. Because of age and hypothyroid, I also have to severely restrict calories.

Yet I lost and am maintaining, after a lifetime of morbid obesity.

Was it easy? Of course not. But I didn't dwell on the difficulty; I focused on solving the 'problem' of losing weight.

Now I am focused on solving the problem of maintenance.

As in all things in life, we have to deal with the reality that confronts us. It doesn't do any good to wish it were otherwise.
I don't think anyone feels sorry for themselves. I think some people are justified in being frustrated when they feel that they have done the hard work and continue to work just as hard to get...nowhere. Maybe it worked for you, but some people are still trying to find exactly what part of the 'problem' they can concentrate on to solve the problem! It also does not do any good to sit in your place of maintenance and criticize others for struggling, esp. when they DO put in the effort and hard work.

I also resent the accusation that some people are not 'dealing' with the reality that confronts them. How do YOU suggest that we deal with reality when we hit a stall and our body refuses to lose anymore? My way of 'dealing' is to try a lot of different solutions, including cutting calories, calorie cycling, VLC, fat fasting...I have tried all of these solutions to no avail. How is that 'not dealing' with my reality? Just because someone puts in the effort to figure out what is wrong or not working does not mean that they are any less frustrated!

I thought the idea of a weight loss board was support...not just a bunch of cheering for people when the succeed, but also support for people when they go through the hard times. Sometimes the hard times are NOT people going on a binge or struggling to stick to their WOE, but people who are struggling to lose, despite doing everything possible. Isn't that just as worthy of support as any other problem facing any other poster on this board?

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Old 12-30-2011, 07:51 AM   #17
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Great article.

I am great at maintaining the weight I have lost (for over 1 year), I just can't seem to get past my current weight.
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Old 12-30-2011, 07:52 AM   #18
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And people forget...just because something worked for THEM does not mean that it will work for everyone else. Everybody has their own challenges, which need to be overcome in their own way.

I am not convinced that one method works for all...but the trick is figuring out what WILL work...and that is the most difficult part. You have to try a lot of things and keep trying until you find it. Everybody has an opinion, too...which goes back what I was saying...what works for you may not work for me.

I may put in the same effort that you did...but my body is not your body! It has its own challenges. I can't understand why people don't accept that just because they were successful in losing weight, does not mean that the same effort put in by others will be just as successful.
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Old 12-30-2011, 08:02 AM   #19
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I enjoyed the article and everyone's comments about it.

It would be interesting to do the same analysis (hormone levels, muscle fibers, etc.) on a group of low-carb dieters and see how that compares to low-calorie dieters. That's not to say that I think maintenance is not a struggle for low-carbers, but it would be interesting to know if there's any difference in those hunger hormones, etc. between the two groups.
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Old 12-30-2011, 08:15 AM   #20
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And people forget...just because something worked for THEM does not mean that it will work for everyone else. Everybody has their own challenges, which need to be overcome in their own way.

I am not convinced that one method works for all...but the trick is figuring out what WILL work...and that is the most difficult part. You have to try a lot of things and keep trying until you find it. Everybody has an opinion, too...which goes back what I was saying...what works for you may not work for me.

I may put in the same effort that you did...but my body is not your body! It has its own challenges. I can't understand why people don't accept that just because they were successful in losing weight, does not mean that the same effort put in by others will be just as successful.
I think the answer to this is the same old bias that exists everywhere. If the answer is not clear or apparent, then that must be that the 'patient' is lying. It is a case of blaming what is not understood on the patient.
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Old 12-30-2011, 08:16 AM   #21
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I thought it was an excellent article, even though some of the details are not particularly appropriate for LCing. The major point--that keeping weight off is a lot harder than losing it, and takes as much attention as weight loss--is certainly true for me. I've kept nearly all my lost weight off for 9 years, but only because I obsess about it, with daily weigh-ins, daily tracking of each and every bite, daily exercise, and a continued commitment to LC for the rest of my life.

The key insight of the article for me: hormones and metabolism both matter a LOT more than how many calories you think you're eating. We all know this, but it's good to be reminded about it. One person can eat half as much food as their friend, and still gain weight while the friend loses. Calories alone don't tell us why.

The article unfortunately didn't discuss epigenetics and their effects on weight loss and gain. A great deal of emerging research in epigenetics (my research field, on toxins, not on human weight) shows that fetal events have powerful effects on adult health.

Genes alone don't determine what happens to you as an adult. Which genes get turned on and which genes get turned off have an even greater effect (epigenetics essentially means which of your genes get expressed and which don't, and that's shaped by environmental exposures, particularly during fetal and early childhood development). So a child who was nutritionally deprived during fetal and early childhood development has genes turned on that will make her much more likely to gain weight as an adult.

The important insight of epigenetics is that while we cannot control our own genome, we do have some influence over our epigenome. We can reshape the factors that turn on and off genes, by paying close attention to nutrition, hormones, and stress (all of which affect the attachment and detachment of methyl groups to genes, which in turn tell them to turn on or off).
Your research sounds fascinating!!
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Old 12-30-2011, 08:21 AM   #22
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clackley,

I just had to tell you that I love the "Happy New Year" brick wall!
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Old 12-30-2011, 08:42 AM   #23
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Stardustshadow-
You seem to be taking my post very, very personally, and that was not my intention.

I always hesitate to use myself as an example because I understand that people are all different, but my purpose was to show that almost anything is possible, since I lost weight when I had a trifecta of serious obstacles:

1. A lifetime of morbid obesity (I'm 70 now, and was obese from early childhood).

2. Post-menopausal--many experts would argue that this is the most difficult time in any woman's life to attempt weight loss.

3, Hypothyroid--which additionally slows the metabolism already slowed by menopause.

Moreover, I didn't experience any 'clear sailing.' Even at 300lbs+, I not only had to eat low carb but also severely restrict calories (because of the factors listed above).

And mid-way in my loss, I stalled for almost a year before I solved that particular issue.

My point is that I read posts here in which people suggest that for 'some,' it's impossible to lose, and if that's true, then then those people need serious medical attention--because weight loss is not 'impossible.' However, for many of us, it is very, very challenging. And I don't believe I'm being 'unsupportive' in pointing this out. I'm a poster child for losing weight despite enormous obstacles (quoting my endo here), and I think that my story helps those who are experiencing obstacles.

When I first told my endo that it seemed that I could not lose weight (at 250 lbs) unless I ate at only 1,000 cal a day, I expected him to tell me that I was wrong, and that I should eat more than that. Instead, he told me that was his estimate, too! And he also told me that he has patients who cannot lose unless they restrict themselves to 750 cal a day. That kept me from feeling too sorry for myself.

Ironically, once I began eating at such a low calorie level, I not only began to lose again, but I realized that my body really didn't require any more food. My 'mind' simply wanted to feed it more, and that's what I had to learn to control.

I'm not writing from some'superior' situation because, quite frankly, maintenance has even more challenges than weight loss, but I've been meeting weight-management challenges for years now and fully understand that it's a lifetime task.
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Old 12-30-2011, 08:57 AM   #24
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Stardustshadow-
You seem to be taking my post very, very personally, and that was not my intention.

I always hesitate to use myself as an example because I understand that people are all different, but my purpose was to show that almost anything is possible, since I lost weight when I had a trifecta of serious obstacles:

1. A lifetime of morbid obesity (I'm 70 now, and was obese from early childhood).

2. Post-menopausal--many experts would argue that this is the most difficult time in any woman's life to attempt weight loss.

3, Hypothyroid--which additionally slows the metabolism already slowed by menopause.

Moreover, I didn't experience any 'clear sailing.' Even at 300lbs+, I not only had to eat low carb but also severely restrict calories (because of the factors listed above).

And mid-way in my loss, I stalled for almost a year before I solved that particular issue.

My point is that I read posts here in which people suggest that for 'some,' it's impossible to lose, and if that's true, then then those people need serious medical attention--because weight loss is not 'impossible.' However, for many of us, it is very, very challenging. And I don't believe I'm being 'unsupportive' in pointing this out. I'm a poster child for losing weight despite enormous obstacles (quoting my endo here), and I think that my story helps those who are experiencing obstacles.

When I first told my endo that it seemed that I could not lose weight (at 250 lbs) unless I ate at only 1,000 cal a day, I expected him to tell me that I was wrong, and that I should eat more than that. Instead, he told me that was his estimate, too! And he also told me that he has patients who cannot lose unless they restrict themselves to 750 cal a day. That kept me from feeling too sorry for myself.

Ironically, once I began eating at such a low calorie level, I not only began to lose again, but I realized that my body really didn't require any more food. My 'mind' simply wanted to feed it more, and that's what I had to learn to control.

I'm not writing from some'superior' situation because, quite frankly, maintenance has even more challenges than weight loss, but I've been meeting weight-management challenges for years now and fully understand that it's a lifetime task.
It is not that I took it personally but on behalf of everyone who, like me, is struggling. It sounded as if you did not think we were entitled to our frustrations and should just...well, suck it up and put in some more effort! Clearly, you understand that it is harder for some, despite the effort they are putting into it, because bodies are all different!

I know that people say maintenance is harder than weight loss. I cannot speak from experience, as I have yet to achieve my goal weight. But I can say that weight loss is just as hard as being fat, but in different ways. Life is hard. But hopefully those who struggle will find the strength to continue until they find the path to success.

Quite frankly, there has been quite a lot of prejudice on this board lately (not referring to your post here, but to many many others that may have promted my response to your post) where there seems to be a lot of 'those who are successful clearly see that it is all about calories in/calories out'. Despite the proven fact that this is not true, and that calories are only a part of the puzzle, there are a number of posters who have been more than happy to promote that viewpoint, without consideration for other people's struggles.

If I took your post incorrectly, I did not mean to and I am sorry. But I have to defend those of us who struggle and are going through the emotional ramifications of this. We work just as hard as those who have succeeded. Sometimes, we need support, and that includes being allowed to talk through our struggle.

Weight loss is just as much of an emotional struggle as it is a physical one, and the emotional ups and downs of it all are very, very important. Managing how one feels about ones body is critical to success. I don't think that any of us should be dissuaded from having those critical, healing discussions, even if they include venting frustrations. That is all!
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Old 12-30-2011, 10:13 AM   #25
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Weight loss is just as much of an emotional struggle as it is a physical one,

I absolutely agree, but would add that in my experience it's almost more of an emotional struggle than a physical one--as is maintenance.

No one who has been morbidly obese for any length of time is immune from a variety of 'food issues' that create often subtle emotional issues in addition to the physical problems inherent in the metabolic dysfunction that led to the weight problem.

Dealing with all this is often overwhelming which is why boards like this are so important to those of us involved in lifetime weight management.
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Old 12-30-2011, 02:12 PM   #26
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Weight loss is just as much of an emotional struggle as it is a physical one,

I absolutely agree, but would add that in my experience it's almost more of an emotional struggle than a physical one--as is maintenance.

No one who has been morbidly obese for any length of time is immune from a variety of 'food issues' that create often subtle emotional issues in addition to the physical problems inherent in the metabolic dysfunction that led to the weight problem.

Dealing with all this is often overwhelming which is why boards like this are so important to those of us involved in lifetime weight management.
I would say that in my experience, the emotional stuff damage comes from being marginalized and mistreated because of weight since childhood, and all of the negative messages we internalize because of this. Running into weight loss stalls and issues can wake negative feelings and self-blame all over again. I agree that anyone who has lived with excess weight for a number of years is most certainly carrying emotional baggage.
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Old 12-30-2011, 02:52 PM   #27
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I would say that in my experience, the emotional stuff damage comes from being marginalized and mistreated because of weight since childhood, and all of the negative messages we internalize because of this. Running into weight loss stalls and issues can wake negative feelings and self-blame all over again. I agree that anyone who has lived with excess weight for a number of years is most certainly carrying emotional baggage.
All the "stalled" need lots of .
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Old 12-30-2011, 03:37 PM   #28
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All the "stalled" need lots of .
Agreed...Hugs and sympathy to you and any other stalled folks out there!
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Old 12-30-2011, 04:34 PM   #29
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I agree with Emily - I actually found this to be a depressing article. Many of the studies cited used what I consider ultra low calorie starvation diets. And I agree that I would be more curious about longer term studies that actually used different low carb diets, not just low fat, volumetric type diets.

Really, the tone of the article was kind of defeatist, but I realize that was from the author's perspective. The mindset of some of the success stories bordered on obsession. Been there, done that, and I just can't do it anymore. Eatiing lower carb does take away some of the obsession of counting every calorie though.
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Old 12-30-2011, 04:41 PM   #30
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[B]Even at 300lbs+, I not only had to eat low carb but also severely restrict calories (because of the factors listed above).

And mid-way in my loss, I stalled for almost a year before I solved that particular issue.
Leo41, can you give a little more detail about how you finally broke that stall? I'm guessing it was the combination of VLC (ie, less than 25 grams per day) and <1000 calories per day. If that was the combination, how long did it take doing that to get the scale moving again?

Thanks for more details, if you're willing to share again.
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