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RealFoodLiving 01-07-2011 05:05 PM

This may help someone re: Gluten
 
Hey y'all,

I have been tested and tested for gluten intolerance by several doctors using several types of tests. I even had the GI dr test the intestines and bowels directly with invasive tests. I've had allergy tests by different specialists.

All the same. No gluten allergy, intolerance or sensitivity. Must be something else causing my symptoms.

Well, I went to my dermatologist today for another round of allergy testing because of my persistent eczema. (We scheduled this when the eczema was in a flare before I started back on LC, GF).

When she commented on the GREAT shape my skin is in right now, when in the cold, dry Winter it is usually worse. I told her that the only thing different I was doing was a high-fat, low-carb and completely gluten-free diet.

I explained about the repeated negative results for gluten testing and the dr told me that she has another patient who reacted dramatically and positively when gluten was removed.

In addition, I can report that my chronic pain (fibromyalgia and CFS) is greatly diminished. Again, I attribute that to being gluten-free.

Hopefully, this will help someone.

tybeeanna 01-07-2011 05:29 PM

So Glad you are doing better.

cleochatra 01-07-2011 06:05 PM

RealFoodLiving. My son was also diagnosed negative for wheat allergies, but I know it affects him badly. It's crazy when the only way to test for gluten intolerance is through abstinence and then reintroducing to check for symptoms. What an eye opener!

Well, when we rid ourselves of gluten for two weeks and reintroduced it, holy smokes! Five of us fell asleep and slept for hours. We were zonked! The other had slight tummy issues.

And then, when I read Dr. Ross, she said that wheat is grass. If we're allergic to grass, we're allergic to wheat! And I've always been allergic to grass but never made the connection. :^o

Thank you so much for sharing your experience, and know we have had the same results. Only refraining from gluten has helped us.

Aomiel 01-07-2011 06:09 PM

Interesting, I've always tested negative for wheat and gluten allergies, but I sneeze like crazy when I'm mowing the lawn and a lot of my unexplained muscle and joint aches and pains vanished when I removed wheat from my diet.

.

WendyK1974 01-07-2011 06:14 PM

Well see it might be more complicated than that. I too had similar results with high fat/low carb and eliminating wheat. I chalked it up to eliminating gluten/wheat. But then I came across a recipe for low carb bread that called for gluten flour that I tried. I had no trouble at all with the bread. And over a period of three weeks I had a slice of it daily.

Something I have not consumed much since LCing is soy. That is the only other typical trouble maker for people. Maybe that? But maybe not because I have had some wraps without problems (although only 2 wraps in 5 months).

Maybe it's the high fat. ;)

MarblesLongGone 01-07-2011 06:15 PM

I have an ear disorder, Menieres Disease. I discovered that when I stay on Atkins induction, my symptoms drop to nil. I was doing some research on Menieres. I discovered references to gluten issues. When I went in for my ear specialist visit, and mentioned my recent reading, and asked him, he said, "Of course removing gluten will help your ears. Gluten promotes inflammation, and anything that promotes inflammation will aggravate your ears!" (Note for the record: the prescribed Menieres diet is low salt, and makes no mention of gluten)

cleochatra 01-07-2011 06:21 PM

I was always allergic to hay and straw and sneezed when I mowed the lawn. I never put those together with wheat, though, even though I often dealt with congestion after eating wheat--it just never occurred to me! It was a total aha moment!

This is what Dr. Ross says on page 70 of The Diet Cure:

"A family of grains that is made up of wheat, rye, barley and oats is actually a family of hybridized grasses.Grasses are high on the list of the most common causes of inhalant allergies. It makes sense that eating grasses is apt to cause problems as well.... Eating foods made from these four grassy grains, particularly wheat, may have many surprising consequences. routinel I read the food diaries that my incoming clients have written. Many people who love bread and pasta describe feeling heavy and tired after eating them. Others say, "I want a nap right after I have a sandwich every day at lunch." Low energy is a very common symptom of gluten intolerance, and it can lead to excessive need for caffeine, nicotine, and other stimulants. ...They never feel full because their gluten-damaged intestines aren't absorbing food very well. Often they crave sweets soon asfter a meal that contains bread or pasta, because sugar will get into their systems, like a drug, no matter how damaged their digestive tract is, and give them a lift. ... Another reason for weight gain besides overeating baked goods and sweets is that the allergy causes them to retain so much water."

jeaniem 01-07-2011 06:26 PM

Another Menierian here. If I eat gluten and/or too many refined carbs my inner ears itch and the 24/7 tinnitus increases to a maddening roar! Those symptoms alone usually get me back on track when I fall off the wagon.

RealFoodLiving 01-07-2011 06:28 PM

Interesting to be sure! And of course, each person is different. I can only speak for myself, but I do know others can benefit by challenging gluten in their diet if they have any health challenges.

Jamie: :hugs: If someone is allergic to grass it makes sense that wheat and gluten would affect them. I'm so glad that you and your family have found the connection.

Aomiel: WOW, looks like something to investigate.

Though for me, I have no grass allergies. So this gluten thing is a total revelation.

AND, it appears that gluten affects auto-immune responses, such as thyroid (hyper or hypo). And I am hypothyroid.

Wendy: Soy has been out of my diet before I went gluten-free so I cannot attribute my changes to soy. I also ate high fat before going gluten-free. Since I've been GF, the changes have been dramatic.

Marbles and jeaniem: Yes, it is reported that gluten initiates an inflammatory response in some people. It sure does in me. And the Menieres
connection is so interesting.

Tybeeanna: Thank you!

lisabinil 01-07-2011 06:32 PM

Gluten can affect some not all with Hashimoto's Thyroiditis-it's an autoimmune thyroid disease and many are gluten intolerant or have celiac disease. I am hypothyroid but don't have Hashi's and gluten does not bother me. :)

theredhead 01-07-2011 07:16 PM

I wish so much that my gluten-free diet would clear up my eczema. It comes and goes with no rhyme or reason. I do everything "right", but nothing helps. :annoyed:

sistertzu 01-07-2011 08:05 PM

I'm in this same group, I've had an upper intestine biopsy, and tested negative. I started with gluten free before shifting to low carb, grain free, in the process I've learned that I'm even more sensitive to rice products, rice flour and even rice powder in supplement (why do they put rice flour in supplements I will never know). I've since cut out all grains, ok I will have a taste of our home grown corn on the cob but that it. I've always been plagued with rashes and have a shopping bag full of prescriptions that haven't worked, I have found that coconut oil has been a big help topically as well as internally. My arthritis has all but disappeared too. I had inner ear pain but mine was caused by uric acid buildup settling on my eardrum.

sistertzu 01-07-2011 08:12 PM

I forgot I too had debilitating foot pain that has disappeared on low carb, grain free.

wcwendy 01-07-2011 08:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by WendyK1974 (Post 14245983)
Well see it might be more complicated than that. I too had similar results with high fat/low carb and eliminating wheat. I chalked it up to eliminating gluten/wheat. But then I came across a recipe for low carb bread that called for gluten flour that I tried. I had no trouble at all with the bread. And over a period of three weeks I had a slice of it daily.

Something I have not consumed much since LCing is soy. That is the only other typical trouble maker for people. Maybe that? But maybe not because I have had some wraps without problems (although only 2 wraps in 5 months).

Maybe it's the high fat. ;)

I have celiac disease, but it took about 12 weeks of eliminating ALL gluten-containing products for me to notice anything.

I had gone several weeks when I ate a piece of cake w/o thinking about it containing gluten. Nothing happened, so I decided that I didn't have a problem w/ gluten and continued to not worry about it. Even though I was on lowcarb (excluding the cake :p) I DID consume gluten after that since I thought that I didn't have a problem with it--soy sauce, some flavorings in beverages, dip mixes, dressings...it's everywhere! I went to my ND and told him that I didn't have a problem w/ it and he told me that some people have to go 12 weeks before noticing a difference. I was one of them! I started over, and it took a full 12 weeks of being ultra-strict before I noticed when I accidentally consumed gluten.

Just wanted to share that because I think that info might not be so commonly-known.

stardustshadow 01-08-2011 02:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Aomiel (Post 14245967)
Interesting, I've always tested negative for wheat and gluten allergies, but I sneeze like crazy when I'm mowing the lawn and a lot of my unexplained muscle and joint aches and pains vanished when I removed wheat from my diet.

.

Forgive me for my ignorance (I don't know much about gluten allergies, except from the very basics) but is there a connection between grass allergy and gluten allergy?? It makes sense, given that grains are grasses. I am curious because DH is allergic to grasses and gets terrible allergies all summer, even though we have no grass to mow. He also has asthma and a host of other minor allergies...could there be a gluten component as well? Never thought about this particular connection before...!

stardustshadow 01-08-2011 02:10 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cleochatra (Post 14246007)
I was always allergic to hay and straw and sneezed when I mowed the lawn. I never put those together with wheat, though, even though I often dealt with congestion after eating wheat--it just never occurred to me! It was a total aha moment!

This is what Dr. Ross says on page 70 of The Diet Cure:

"A family of grains that is made up of wheat, rye, barley and oats is actually a family of hybridized grasses.Grasses are high on the list of the most common causes of inhalant allergies. It makes sense that eating grasses is apt to cause problems as well.... Eating foods made from these four grassy grains, particularly wheat, may have many surprising consequences. routinel I read the food diaries that my incoming clients have written. Many people who love bread and pasta describe feeling heavy and tired after eating them. Others say, "I want a nap right after I have a sandwich every day at lunch." Low energy is a very common symptom of gluten intolerance, and it can lead to excessive need for caffeine, nicotine, and other stimulants. ...They never feel full because their gluten-damaged intestines aren't absorbing food very well. Often they crave sweets soon asfter a meal that contains bread or pasta, because sugar will get into their systems, like a drug, no matter how damaged their digestive tract is, and give them a lift. ... Another reason for weight gain besides overeating baked goods and sweets is that the allergy causes them to retain so much water."

AH HA!!!

RealFoodLiving 01-08-2011 05:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wcwendy (Post 14246298)
I have celiac disease, but it took about 12 weeks of eliminating ALL gluten-containing products for me to notice anything.

I had gone several weeks when I ate a piece of cake w/o thinking about it containing gluten. Nothing happened, so I decided that I didn't have a problem w/ gluten and continued to not worry about it. Even though I was on lowcarb (excluding the cake :p) I DID consume gluten after that since I thought that I didn't have a problem with it--soy sauce, some flavorings in beverages, dip mixes, dressings...it's everywhere! I went to my ND and told him that I didn't have a problem w/ it and he told me that some people have to go 12 weeks before noticing a difference. I was one of them! I started over, and it took a full 12 weeks of being ultra-strict before I noticed when I accidentally consumed gluten.

Just wanted to share that because I think that info might not be so commonly-known.

THANK YOU!!!
Yes, I experienced the same thing, over and over. It wasn't until I went gluten-free and stuck with it without cheating (re-started in Nov) that I noticed the difference.

Also, I discovered there were some wheat protein in my supplements, (a small amount) still it can cause a reaction.

bwylde 01-08-2011 05:52 AM

I know there is a connection. I tested negative for celiac and gluten intolerance but I know I can't handle gluten. If I go totally gluten free for a period of time, I can handle it but only for a while before I start having symptoms again (I read that some people who are intolerant don't have symptoms but I think I am one of those who can build a certain level of tolerance or eat gluten if it is traditionally prepared ie sourdough or other forms of fermentation and/or soaking to break the gluten down but I tend to push it over board :o). At one point I was so sensitive to it I couldn't even make bread for my family without my hands cracking and becoming inflamed (that's when I started using a bread machine). I need to learn to get it out of my diet completely but I hate that I can't expect it of my family since it's not really fair to them :( (I have younger children and a carb addicted hubby so I try to make everything from scratch using traditional methods ala Weston A. Price for increased nutrition and digestibility for them).

RealFoodLiving 01-08-2011 07:27 AM

Bwylde,

I am a whole-grain baker and my family does well on my homemade bread products using good ingredients. I don't expect them to give up grains unless they have a health problem. I don't have any problem handling the grains and dough, but if I did I would wear gloves.

I hope you can remove gluten from your diet (since you identified you have a problem with it a) and still give your family good foods.

kat819 01-08-2011 08:31 AM

Many food reactions are characterized as "intolerances" and not true allergies. The only allergy that allergists can test for are those that are IgE-mediated, but there are other types that can affect almost every system in the body. They can make some people very sick or even kill them, though they would test negative for any standard allergy test. The only test that works and is considered by allergists to be the gold standard is the elimination of the allergen to see if symptoms disappear and then a challenge, where a small amount of the suspected allergen is reintroduced to see if there are symptoms. Many foods can take a very long time to clear out of the system, as in three or four months. Even if a tiny amount of the food is tolerated, that doesn't mean that larger amounts will be.

RealFoodLiving 01-08-2011 08:41 AM

Hi Kat,

As I mentioned in my opening post, I've been invasive tests as well. I had biopsies done on the small intestine and again, negative.

Quote:

All the same. No gluten allergy, intolerance or sensitivity. Must be something else causing my symptoms.

kat819 01-08-2011 09:00 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RealFoodLiving (Post 14247260)
Hi Kat,

As I mentioned in my opening post, I've been invasive tests as well. I had biopsies done on the small intestine and again, negative.

Sorry, I was clarifying for other people.

There's a lot that tests just don't reflect. My daughter has eosinophilic esophagitis, it is a disease that has a variety of "triggers" some food, some environmental and there are no tests that can show that eating dairy is practically lethal for her. Luckily, no doctor is arguing with us after six years of total misery that there's something else causing it or even worse, that we're just imagining it. I think lots of people end up having severe issues with gluten that no test will measure. I have a friend now who has had severe gastritis and esophagitis for the last three months, bad enough to land her in the hospital and the GI is telling her that she has no gluten issue and to take simethicone (Gas-X). This despite the fact that she eats anything with wheat in it and her nose starts running copiously within minutes and the pain starts within half an hour.

sistertzu 01-08-2011 10:29 AM

I had something else to add, if your sensitive to gluten with a rash in my research I have learned to stop using iodized salt because the iodine can exacerbate the rash, which I have found to be true for myself. I have since started using grey salt, himalayan salt, or natural sea salt. I was a home baker as well with extremely cracked, dry, bleeding fingers constantly, which has resolved abstaining from grains. As well as having many mouth sores, even eye lid sores that have resolved.


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