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Old 06-28-2010, 03:01 PM   #1
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london broil

what the heck do i do with it. i have 2 of them, it came in like a family pack. it does not look tender like a steak so i dont know how to prepare it. i would love to cook it tonight. any ideas
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Old 06-28-2010, 03:06 PM   #2
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Kickin' London Broil with Bleu Cheese Butter
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Old 06-28-2010, 03:30 PM   #3
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I love london broil! Not the most tender to be sure, but nonetheless economical. You could try a dry rub with spices of your choosing, or just throw it on the grill with s&p. I think the trick with london broil is really not to overcook it-medium rare seems just right for me. Not bleeding, but still red inside-stays juicy that way. I then proceed to slather it with horseradish after it's cooked, because I'm a spice hound. Look up lowcarb marinades too. Put the steak in a large ziploc with any lowcarb marinades for a couple of hours, and you're good to go. Mmmmm....good!
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Old 06-28-2010, 03:33 PM   #4
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I always marinate it 24-48 hours in the equivalent of Italian salad dressing: olive oil, vinegar or citrus, & lots of seasonings.

Grill to medium rare, then make sure to slice thinly on the bias.

It's not a terribly tender steak but it's definately tasty AND economical (1.47/lb here on sale).
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Old 06-28-2010, 03:37 PM   #5
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Is that the same as flank steak? If so, you need to marinade it for at least a few hours.
This is my fav...
1/3 cup olive oil
1/4 soy sauce
1/4 vinegar
2 minced garlic cloves
2 tsp powder splenda
Pepper
dash of tabasco
1 large onion sliced

Cook up the onions with the marinade and serve as a side. Grill the steak to desired doneness and slice across the grain.
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Old 06-28-2010, 03:48 PM   #6
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Warning. Food geek alert.

Technically speaking, "london broil" is a method of cooking the meat, not a specific cut. It refers to a tougher cut of meat that is best broiled (or grilled). It CAN be flank steak, but is often round (top or bottom). Usually if it's not marked flank steak, but rather london broil, it's top or bottom round.

So yes, if you get a good price on top or bottom round roasts, you CAN cut it into london broils.

And no, the name has nothing to do with London, England....it's not a common thing to see in English cuisine.
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Old 06-28-2010, 03:48 PM   #7
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Old 06-28-2010, 07:39 PM   #8
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Remember to slice the meat at an angle...one of the first things my parents taught be about london broil and it's texture.

You can actually bake a London Broil. Have done so, and gave it a quick broil before taking out.......that is if you don't have a grill! I prefer grilled myself though.

I would seriously considering marinating this meat. It can be quite tough.....
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Old 06-28-2010, 08:00 PM   #9
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London Broil makes the best jerky! Get some jerky seasonings and follow package directions.
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Old 06-28-2010, 08:04 PM   #10
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Whatever you do NOT overcook it or it will get ugly.

http://www.lowcarbfriends.com/bbs/lo...don-broil.html
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Old 06-28-2010, 08:12 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Molly Bloom View Post
Remember to slice the meat at an angle...one of the first things my parents taught be about london broil and it's texture.

You can actually bake a London Broil. Have done so, and gave it a quick broil before taking out.......that is if you don't have a grill! I prefer grilled myself though.

I would seriously considering marinating this meat. It can be quite tough.....
Agreed on all counts - slicing it against the grain is crucial. I hated London broil when I was a kid because my family always overcooked it, and it was so tough and dry. I recently had my eyes opened to the possibilities of it's deliciousness when the person who served it to us marinated it, cooked it rare, and sliced it against the grain. It was delicious.
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Old 06-29-2010, 08:10 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HerBoudoir View Post
Warning. Food geek alert.

Technically speaking, "london broil" is a method of cooking the meat, not a specific cut. It refers to a tougher cut of meat that is best broiled (or grilled). It CAN be flank steak, but is often round (top or bottom). Usually if it's not marked flank steak, but rather london broil, it's top or bottom round.

So yes, if you get a good price on top or bottom round roasts, you CAN cut it into london broils.

And no, the name has nothing to do with London, England....it's not a common thing to see in English cuisine.
In our neck of the woods (Texas) a flank is marked as flank and London broil is the thick bottom round. I usually shy away from the broils unless its two for one. I did one in the spring but cooked it sous vide (google that ) and then put on grill quickly for marks and color. It was very tender. Completely different texture cooked that way. OOps-too late. Food geek alert!
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Old 06-29-2010, 08:17 AM   #13
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I love London Broil because it is quick, easy, and delicious!

I rub the meat with olive oil, then rub in paprika, salt, and pepper, to taste. Then I broil about 5 to 6 min on each side (about 4 inches from electric element).

I let the meat rest for about 10 min. so the juices are retained and circulated, then I slice thin, against the grain--at an angle.

I love this meat on an oopsie roll with a little mayo.
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Old 06-29-2010, 08:33 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mamasooze View Post
In our neck of the woods (Texas) a flank is marked as flank and London broil is the thick bottom round. I usually shy away from the broils unless its two for one. I did one in the spring but cooked it sous vide (google that ) and then put on grill quickly for marks and color. It was very tender. Completely different texture cooked that way. OOps-too late. Food geek alert!
Flank steak is usually marked as such here and is typically more expensive than london broils. But according to wiki, flank steaks CAN be marked london broil which makes sense because you basically cook it london broil-style.

Do you have one of the new sous vide home models or do you have a commercial one?
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Old 06-29-2010, 08:38 AM   #15
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Here in Texas we also have something called the "Texas Broil." I'm told that this can be cooked and cut and served like a London Broil. It's from the shoulder instead of from the round, and it's a little thinner than a typical London Broil cut.

I'm trying my first Texas Broil today.
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Old 06-29-2010, 08:39 AM   #16
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overcook the London Broil. In a word, keep an eye on the clock. Love & Profits: FLATFERENGHI
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Old 06-29-2010, 09:11 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HerBoudoir View Post
Flank steak is usually marked as such here and is typically more expensive than london broils. But according to wiki, flank steaks CAN be marked london broil which makes sense because you basically cook it london broil-style.

Do you have one of the new sous vide home models or do you have a commercial one?
No sous vide machine--but lots of imagination. I have one of those electric turkey fry-ers and I fill it with water and put it as close to the degree I want, seal the bag and watch the temp. I have a pocket temp taker. I move it around a couple of time (you have to keep it submerged). Once you have kept it at the temp for the required length of time you are finished. Either grill or freeze. I don't really want/need the machine--I have too much machinery in the kitchen now
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Old 06-29-2010, 09:22 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by mamasooze View Post
No sous vide machine--but lots of imagination. I have one of those electric turkey fry-ers and I fill it with water and put it as close to the degree I want, seal the bag and watch the temp. I have a pocket temp taker. I move it around a couple of time (you have to keep it submerged). Once you have kept it at the temp for the required length of time you are finished. Either grill or freeze. I don't really want/need the machine--I have too much machinery in the kitchen now
How cool!
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Old 06-29-2010, 09:47 AM   #19
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I want the sous vide machine....next time I have a spare $400 I might just do that ;-)
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Old 06-29-2010, 10:34 AM   #20
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I want the sous vide machine....next time I have a spare $400 I might just do that ;-)
I may want one down the road....
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Old 06-29-2010, 10:52 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by mamasooze View Post
No sous vide machine--but lots of imagination. I have one of those electric turkey fry-ers and I fill it with water and put it as close to the degree I want, seal the bag and watch the temp. I have a pocket temp taker. I move it around a couple of time (you have to keep it submerged). Once you have kept it at the temp for the required length of time you are finished. Either grill or freeze. I don't really want/need the machine--I have too much machinery in the kitchen now
What kind of bag do you seal the meat in? Could this be done in a large stock pot instead of a turkey cooker?
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Old 06-29-2010, 12:01 PM   #22
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Marinate for at least 24hrs and be sure to slice against the grain. It can be a tough cut of meat if not prepared right.
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Old 06-29-2010, 12:12 PM   #23
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What kind of bag do you seal the meat in? Could this be done in a large stock pot instead of a turkey cooker?
I have a sealer but I use regular freezer ziplok bags- not the cheapies. I put what I want in the bag( meat, marinade, herbs, whatever) zip it and with a straw draw out as much air as I can at the corner and seal good. Yes, you can use a stock pot on a gas stove so you can regulate heat as you need it and keep moving the bag around. I'm going to get an aquarium water pump for my turkey cooker so the water circulates and I don't have to stand over it. I saw a guy on line that used his igloo cooler. Keeping the temperature steady is the key.
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Old 06-29-2010, 12:33 PM   #24
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I have a sealer but I use regular freezer ziplok bags- not the cheapies. I put what I want in the bag( meat, marinade, herbs, whatever) zip it and with a straw draw out as much air as I can at the corner and seal good. Yes, you can use a stock pot on a gas stove so you can regulate heat as you need it and keep moving the bag around. I'm going to get an aquarium water pump for my turkey cooker so the water circulates and I don't have to stand over it. I saw a guy on line that used his igloo cooler. Keeping the temperature steady is the key.
Thanks. I didn't know that I could boil food in a Ziplock freezer bag. I may have to give it a try one of these days.

BTW - I made the Texas Broiler today. I cooked it just like the London Broil, but a few minutes less because the steak is thinner. It turned out great.
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Old 06-29-2010, 12:33 PM   #25
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I love to take less tender cuts of meat like this and cook them in my crock pot for a long time with some additions...sometimes, it's onion and mushroom, sometimes a jar of good salsa. I make some brown rice for my family, and a salad for myself. It's always yummy. PLUS, it is so easy to do...it just cooks while I am out running errands and I come home to the smell of dinner! Love that!
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Old 06-29-2010, 06:08 PM   #26
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I love to take less tender cuts of meat like this and cook them in my crock pot for a long time with some additions
That is exactly the way I cook this particular piece of meat. Always turns out juicy and perfect.
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Old 06-30-2010, 09:01 AM   #27
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We bought a big piece, cut it in two, and froze half. The first half went in the slow cooker with only water, and it was tough, dry, and flavorless.

The second I put in the slow cooker extra early, ran it on high for a while then low, with a total of about 11 hours of cooking. I also put in one beef bouillon cube. This one was relatively tender, and tasted much better.

On a related note: I've determined that braising meat like this before it goes in the slow cooker is a waste of time. That is, I cooked two pieces in the crock pot, one braised, one not. Absolutely indistinguishable.
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Old 06-30-2010, 09:58 AM   #28
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We bought a big piece, cut it in two, and froze half. The first half went in the slow cooker with only water, and it was tough, dry, and flavorless.

The second I put in the slow cooker extra early, ran it on high for a while then low, with a total of about 11 hours of cooking. I also put in one beef bouillon cube. This one was relatively tender, and tasted much better.

On a related note: I've determined that braising meat like this before it goes in the slow cooker is a waste of time. That is, I cooked two pieces in the crock pot, one braised, one not. Absolutely indistinguishable.
London broil gets tough cooked in liquid, in my experience. Broiling is best. Maybe that's why it's called a London broil.
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