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Old 06-10-2010, 02:20 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by ravenrose View Post
This gets confusing. "Coconut milk" is traditionally a canned product from Asia. It's low in carbs, but not all THAT low.

There is a newish product out, sold in milk cartons either refrigerated or not. The one I tried is from So Delicious. It is really low carb--1 gram per cup!

HOWEVER it curdles when you add alcohol!!! I tried that with the DaVinci pineapple, a couple of ways, and it was always curdly awful.

Just try a small quantity of what you are mixing before you ruin a big glassful of expensive ingredients like I did.
The stuff I got at Publix is 2 grams per half cup. The recipe calls for 1/4 cup so 1 carb. Hard to beat. Its in a can and costs about $1.69 or so at Publix. No curdling, but then it doesn't last long in my glass!

Betty
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Old 06-10-2010, 02:23 PM   #32
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Originally Posted by 2bflawless View Post
Betty your a hoot! I am making pina coladas this weekend I may stick in the blender with ice and make a frozen pina colada! yum.
LET ME KNOW WHAT YA THINK! (my guess is, you will me forever!) LOL

Betty
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Old 06-10-2010, 02:42 PM   #33
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Originally Posted by daisyHair View Post
Oooo how wonderful to become a Sommerlier! I am sure I will have LOTS of questions for you as my DH and I are budding oenophiles.

One thing I have been wanting to ask someone is what is a Burgundy really? Is if from a particular region? A particular grape? Just a red wine?

I rarely see a label called "Burgundy". I have always wondered this.
In France, the wines are labeled by region, except for Alsace. Red Burgundy is 100% Pinot Noir. However, Burgundy produces some exceptional wines from Chardonnay, somestimes called White Burgundy. Some of the best Red Burgundies come from the sub region, Cote du Nuit. In Northern Burgundy, Chardonnay is named Chablis after the region. Chablis generally don't touch oak in order to preserve its minerality and fresh fruit flavors. Chardonnay is also grown further south, where it may touch oak in order to mellow out the wine...bring about more buttery notes. In comparison to American Chardonnays, French are way more delicate and subtle. Even further south, Beaujolais wines are made from a grape called Gamay through a process of carbonic masseration. Often called the bubble gum wine in the industry, its reputation is really not there. I like some but not others but it is still not my preference.

Red Burgundy regions you may see on the label instead of "Burgundy": Cote de Nuit, and sub-regions like St. George, Vosnee-Romanee (the best, but $$$), Gevrey-Chambertin.
White Burgundy regions you may see: Cote du Beaune,and sub-regions Meursault (my fav- a little oak), Puligny-Montrachet, or Cote Chalonnaise, Maconnaise, Pouilly-Fuisse.

Generally the more specific the wine-region on the label the "better" the Burgundy, but that also means $$$$.

Hope that helps, Enjoy!

PS. Lots of good Pinot Noir out of Oregon...in the French style.
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Old 06-10-2010, 02:50 PM   #34
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Originally Posted by steady View Post
In France, the wines are labeled by region, except for Alsace. Red Burgundy is 100% Pinot Noir. However, Burgundy produces some exceptional wines from Chardonnay, somestimes called White Burgundy. Some of the best Red Burgundies come from the sub region, Cote du Nuit. In Northern Burgundy, Chardonnay is named Chablis after the region. Chablis generally don't touch oak in order to preserve its minerality and fresh fruit flavors. Chardonnay is also grown further south, where it may touch oak in order to mellow out the wine...bring about more buttery notes. In comparison to American Chardonnays, French are way more delicate and subtle. Even further south, Beaujolais wines are made from a grape called Gamay through a process of carbonic masseration. Often called the bubble gum wine in the industry, its reputation is really not there. I like some but not others but it is still not my preference.

Red Burgundy regions you may see on the label instead of "Burgundy": Cote de Nuit, and sub-regions like St. George, Vosnee-Romanee (the best, but $$$), Gevrey-Chambertin.
White Burgundy regions you may see: Cote du Beaune,and sub-regions Meursault (my fav- a little oak), Puligny-Montrachet, or Cote Chalonnaise, Maconnaise, Pouilly-Fuisse.

Generally the more specific the wine-region on the label the "better" the Burgundy, but that also means $$$$.

Hope that helps, Enjoy!

PS. Lots of good Pinot Noir out of Oregon...in the French style.
What fantastic info! I suspected it was because of region but didn't have any idea there was also a "white burgundy"..

I am going to have to look for a Burgundy from Cote du Nuit next time I am at my wine shop. You should start a wine blog (or do you already have one?).

My husband loves Pouilly-Fuisse. I like more dry.
Isn't a Beaujolais also a "young wine" and never saved in a cellar?

So what are you going to do when you have finished your training?
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Old 06-10-2010, 03:00 PM   #35
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Originally Posted by daisyHair View Post
What fantastic info! I suspected it was because of region but didn't have any idea there was also a "white burgundy"..

I am going to have to look for a Burgundy from Cote du Nuit next time I am at my wine shop. You should start a wine blog (or do you already have one?).

My husband loves Pouilly-Fuisse. I like more dry.
Isn't a Beaujolais also a "young wine" and never saved in a cellar?

So what are you going to do when you have finished your training?
No blog (yet), but I sure go on and on in my journal about wines and drinking.

I love wine adventures...I'd love to hear about it and help you find your "soul wine"...so many wines, so little time...it really truly is my passion. Trying to start up a business teaching wines taking a light hearted fun approach...it is all about the journey right? We will see...

I like dry too. Yup you are right, Beaujolais are meant to be enjoyed young. The third Thursday in November, many Beaujolais are released they are labeled as Beaujolais Nouveau...Thanksgiving is a popular time for these.
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Old 06-10-2010, 03:07 PM   #36
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Originally Posted by steady View Post
No blog (yet), but I sure go on and on in my journal about wines and drinking.

I love wine adventures...I'd love to hear about it and help you find your "soul wine"...so many wines, so little time...it really truly is my passion. Trying to start up a business teaching wines taking a light hearted fun approach...it is all about the journey right? We will see...

I like dry too. Yup you are right, Beaujolais are meant to be enjoyed young. The third Thursday in November, many Beaujolais are released they are labeled as Beaujolais Nouveau...Thanksgiving is a popular time for these.
I would love to find my "Soul" wine too. Well I actually like trying them so much that I am not sure I would ever settle.. always be on the lookout for the next one!

We had a really nice wine from Australia last month, it was Wirra Wirra Church Block - a 2007. Really complex rich flavor - my very fav. wine so far - it was a mixture of three wines Cabernet Sauvignon 50%, Shiraz 30% and Merlot 20%. I liked it so much I had our local GranCru get me a case.
I have it in the bottom of my closet because I really don't have a cool enough place to store it! It was a little impulsive but it was that good (to me).

When and if you get that Blog up let me know!!!!!
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Old 03-14-2012, 12:01 PM   #37
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Originally Posted by steady View Post
I am not going to be a damper on this glorious parade!
With all this new wine training ( I am studying for my Sommerlier certificate)...sparklings and Champagnes (and Sav blancs) are my new love. Anyway the sparkling wine process traditionally includes a dosage added prior to being packaged up. A dosage is a mixture of usually unfermented grape juice and/or sugar and yeast. Good quality champagnes and sparkling this dosage continues fermentation into alcohol in the bottle so there is no residual sugar, but in less expensive one that are taken to market quickly, the dosage does not have time to ferment as a result there is residual sugar. This is true even if the bottle says "brut" which is consider a very dry champagne. Despite what the bottle says, it there is any perceived sweetness then it there probably is some residual sugar, hence carbs.

Oh there are several good quality no dosage sparklings...look for terms like "brut zero", "brut naturel", or "sauvage".

The nutritional profiles on wines and sparklings are an average, but there is a good range brand to brand and even bottle to bottle with respect to calories, carbs, and sugar.

Just throwing this out there, but overall I love Extra Brut Champagne! Enjoy! Cheers!
ok...so i found some brut zero at specs..that would be the best choice? does that mean theres no sugar added? any idea of the carb count?

thanks!
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Old 03-14-2012, 06:52 PM   #38
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Originally Posted by loveispeakincode View Post
ok...so i found some brut zero at specs..that would be the best choice? does that mean theres no sugar added? any idea of the carb count?

thanks!
Brut zero is your best choice among sparklings in terms of carbs. Generally, if the sparkling is made using Methode Champenoise and it is labeled brut zero it does not have the last dosage, which usually has sugar. While the carb ranges can vary greatly, most brut zeros have 0-3 grams of sugar per liter...that is pretty dry.

Cheers!
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