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Old 03-27-2010, 07:44 AM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by laureninva View Post
Actually it IS normal when LCing, to have to go less frequently. Think about it, having a BM is getting rid of waste, and when eating LC properly, we are eating nutritious, whole food - not a bunch of sugar and starch and empty calories. More of what we eat is actually being used by our bodies and not expelled in the bathroom. Hope that helps!

ETA - and just to clarify, I'm talking about frequency and even size of BMs - NOT to be confused with constipation.
This has always been my thought, too. Carbs=every day. LC=every 2-3. Also, a good book relaxes and helps move things along
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Old 04-08-2013, 01:43 AM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by laureninva View Post
Actually it IS normal when LCing, to have to go less frequently. Think about it, having a BM is getting rid of waste, and when eating LC properly, we are eating nutritious, whole food - not a bunch of sugar and starch and empty calories. More of what we eat is actually being used by our bodies and not expelled in the bathroom. Hope that helps!

ETA - and just to clarify, I'm talking about frequency and even size of BMs - NOT to be confused with constipation.
I agree 100%. It's a total myth that we have to have a daily bowel movement - I've read this originated with the likes of madman Dr Kellogg who was obsessed.

I once ate zero carb for 6 months and only had one or two bowel movements a week. No gas, no constipation. My body was using practically all of the food I ingested and there was very little waste. No nasty bathroom niffs either

Last edited by Lola Bartez; 04-08-2013 at 01:59 AM..
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Old 04-08-2013, 01:58 AM   #33
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not sure I'm allowed to directly link to Dr Eades Protein Power blog so I've copied and pasted an entry on bowel movements - very interesting!




'Let’s engage in a sort of thought experiment. Let’s assume that way back in the early days of medicine doctors always wanted to see us cough up mucus from our lungs. Since mucus is a kind of breeding ground for all kinds of nasty bacteria, it would make sense in the olden, pre-antibiotic days to want patients to hack up as much of this stuff as possible to get it out of the body where the bacteria could no longer wreak their havoc.

Let’s assume that doctors of old–who didn’t realize that the excess mucus was the body’s way of ridding itself of something foreign, i.e., the bacteria or viruses causing the infection–started equating coughing up ‘healthy’ amounts of mucus with good health. It’s not too far a leap to imagine these doctors supposing that if they could get their patients to cough up stuff all the time, the respiratory system would stay clear of the mucus that harbors all the pathogens that cause lung problems. Druggists might come up with concoctions that would cause people to cough, even if they didn’t need to.

Now let’s imagine that the idea that coughing up large amounts of mucus-laden sputum reaches the point of a national obsession. People, especially the elderly for whom respiratory infections are much more dangerous, discuss with one another how much sputum they produce and how often. If they don’t cough as much or as productively as they perceive those around them are doing, they go to their doctors who prescribe a sputum inducing medicine for them. People everywhere are obsessed with keeping their respiratory systems clean.


Now, someone comes along and says, Hey, world, I’ve got the perfect product to keep everyone coughing productively. Use my product and before you know it you’ll be coughing your head off and ridding your lungs of all kinds of nasty junk. Here, try one of these. It’s called a cigarette.

In today’s modern world we all know what cigarettes do. The irritation of the smoke damages the lining of the tubes that carry air into and out of the lungs. As the damage continues, goblet cells (so called because they resemble little goblets), the cells that produce mucus, increase in size and number, producing more mucus to coat and protect the cells lining the airways. As the smoking continues, so does the damage, and so does the double duty of the goblet cells. Ultimately, in far too many people, the production of the protective mucus from the goblet cells isn’t able to keep up with the damaging effects of the smoke and cell injury occurs. As these cells are damaged, they cease to function properly, and ultimately die. They are then replaced by new cells, which themselves go through the same cycle. Somewhere along the way one of these cells, due to the damaging effects from the smoke, undergoes a malignant transformation and starts to reproduce itself. When this happens lung cancer is born.

We know what happens to the lungs with smoking. We know that all the coughing and mucus production isn’t a good thing–it isn’t protecting us from disease; it is the result of disease. But if we lived in a society that worshipped bringing up mucus every day, how long would it take us to figure out that smoking wasn’t particularly good for us?

Into this society of mucus lovers a researcher comes along and writes a paper showing how cigarettes cause an increase in mucus. He talks to the press and tells them about his research, saying, ‘I’ve now figured out how these wonderful cigarettes work to improve our mucus production. They damage the cells, which then make and release more mucus to protect themselves. It’s really wonderful how the body responds thusly. Now that we know how it all works, let’s go out and smoke even more.’

Preposterous, you’re probably thinking. Only if you live in a society that doesn’t worship regular mucus production.

We live in a society that worships regular bowel movements. Doctors for the last few hundred years have focused much of their effort in ensuring the regularity of their patients. Many people, the elderly especially, are obsessed with moving their bowels daily. Most people, if asked, would probably reckon that it’s not good to have fecal matter just sitting around in the colon. Get it out of there, they would say. It can’t be healthy. Just as it escaped the notice of our doctors in the scenario I imagined above that animals in the wild don’t bring up copious amounts of mucus daily, it has escaped the notice of doctors today that animals in the wild, especially carnivorous animals, don’t always have daily bowel movements, and that when they do, such BMs aren’t always huge and loose.

Into our bowel-regularity-worshipping society there has come a substance that ensures regularity. It’s called fiber. It is sold everywhere in diverse forms. All manner of ‘experts’ from our doctors to our grandparents encourage us to consume plenty of fiber. If we can’t get enough from the foods we eat to achieve regularity, we are encouraged to buy supplements. Everyone is on the regularity bandwagon and, by extension, the fiber bandwagon. The much despised Jane Brody has written countless times on the virtues of fiber, WebMD encourages us to get our share, even C. Everett Coop exhorts us to keep the fiber coming. And, despite numerous studies showing that fiber doesn’t really do squat for us healthwise, everyone continues to recommend it.

To paraphrase John Huston: Evidence? We ain’t got no evidence. We don’t need no evidence. We don’t have to show you any stinking evidence.

Into this society of bowel movement lovers a researcher comes along and writes a paper showing how fiber causes an increase in regularity. Our intrepid researcher’s name is Dr. Paul L. McNeil; he is a cell biologist at the Medical College of Georgia. I’ll let him tell how it all works.

When you eat high-fiber foods, they bang up against the cells lining the gastrointestinal tract, rupturing their outer covering. What we are saying is this banging and tearing increases the level of lubricating mucus. It’s a good thing.

Indeed?

He goes on:

It’s a bit of a paradox, but what we are saying is an injury at the cell level can promote health of the GI tract as a whole.

Really?

He goes on to explain that even though epithelial cells usually live less than a week, they are regularly bombarded, in most of us at least three times a day, as food passes by.

These cells are a biological boundary that separates the inside world, if you will, from this nasty outside world. On the cellular scale, roughage, such as grains and fibers that can’t be completely digested, are a mechanical challenge for these cells.

But in what he and colleague Dr. Katsuya Miyake view as an adaptive response, most of these cells rapidly repair damage and, in the process, excrete even more mucus, which provides a bit of cell protection as it eases food down the GI tract.

As reported in ScienceDaily

In research published in 2003 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Dr. McNeil showed proof of his then decade-old hypothesis that cells with internal membranes use those membranes to repair potentially lethal outer-membrane injuries. A recent paper published in Nature in collaboration with Dr. Kevin Campbell’s laboratory at the University of Iowa showed how human disease, including certain forms of muscular dystrophy, can result from a failure of this mechanism.

An outer membrane tear is like an open door through which calcium just outside the cell rushes in. Too much calcium is lethal but that first taste signals the vulnerable cell it better do something quick. With epithelial cells, several of the internal mucus-filled compartments fuse together within about three seconds, forming a patch to fix the tear. In the process the compartments expel their contents so, almost like a bonus, extra mucus becomes available to lubricate the GI tract.

And a final telling paragraph.

The scientists aren’t certain how many times cells can take a hit, but they suspect turnover is so high because of the constant injury. Potentially caustic substances, such as alcohol and aspirin, can produce so much damage that natural recovery mechanisms can’t keep up. But they doubt a roughage overdose is possible.

(You can click here to read this study in its entirety in PLoS Biology)

So, we have a situation where a product causes damage to the cells lining a tube, causing them to produce a lot of mucus in an attempt to protect themselves. In the process many of these cells die and are replaced by new cells. And this is perceived as a good thing.

My question is: is it really a good thing?'
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Last edited by Lola Bartez; 04-08-2013 at 02:00 AM..
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Old 04-08-2013, 02:41 AM   #34
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fascinating.

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Old 04-08-2013, 07:10 AM   #35
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Reduced Residue... used to be the Astronauts were fed to prevent having to go with the early space flights...
Yes it is normal, especially early on as our bowels are stretched by the bulk of the other way of eating. Dr Atkins recommend psyillium fiber capsules... were available through their web site. I have since found a comparable psyillium capsules in stores... I take 1-2 with every meal. It's better to prevent constipation than to treat it with laxitives.
I don't go every day but approx every other. Keep your fluids up.
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Old 04-08-2013, 10:59 AM   #36
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I agree 100%. It's a total myth that we have to have a daily bowel movement


Me too....problem is I WANT to have a daily bm. I just don't feel comfortable without one.
Sooooooooooooo.....I use ground flax meal as an additive twice a day.
I first got flax meal in the very beginning of my lc'ing. I missed bread so much that I made flax pancakes and used like tortillas for a faux bread experience. It was instrumental in my getting used to no carbs.
After a few weeks I lost the craving for bread and so stopped the flax pancakes.
Immediately following this decision the constipation started...
It was a problem for me...It wasn't just the discomfort of not having a daily bowel movement, but the stool became dry and hard and passing it was painful. I have hemorrhoids and they would flare up terribly, causing major discomfort including bleeding. I was basically in LC crisis. If I didn't find a solution then LC was doomed.
That's when the light went on and I remembered the flax.
Walmart carries Hodgsdon mills ground flax seed that has zero net carbs. It has a bland but slightly nutty taste and a texture of coarse meal. I poured into a big diner style sugar jar and sprinkle it on my two main meals.
Voila!!! problem solved.
With a few execptions here and there I'm back to my daily routine...Feel great, and have been losing weight steadily.
good luck to you
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Old 04-08-2013, 11:13 AM   #37
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I think it's more important how you go, and how it comes out than how often you go. If you have to strain, and push and give yourself a hernia, then maybe you aren't going often enough so that it has sat too long, or maybe you have too much roughage.

I don't think it should be loose as a goose, but it should come out easily, without pain and struggle. We have sphincter to keep it in, it should be easy to get out. How often you go can affect that, but also diet and liquid intake as well.
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Old 04-08-2013, 11:31 AM   #38
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I am a daily or every other day person. I can't imagine going longer than that, but I also eat a ton of vegetables, take magnesium malate, vitamin C, and drink a lot of water.

Plus, I've also found that exercise leads to more regularity. The same is true for cats and dogs I've found- when they run around and get a lot of exercise they usually have to use the bathroom right after.
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Old 04-09-2013, 05:09 AM   #39
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I love my cheese but when LCing... too much will stop me uplike a cork! Lesson learned. It's supposed to be limited on Atkins 72 anyway.
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Old 04-09-2013, 01:48 PM   #40
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For years I heard the saying when things got difficult, "that makes the cheese more binding". Still not sure about the old saying, but have learned about the binding power of cheese. LC makes me irregular and occasionally constipated. Fiber supplements, lemon juice (sugarless lemonaide), and limiting cheese intake seems to help, but I have learned that at least for me it is an "occupational hazzard". I try to avoid laxatives as they certainly can be addictive. Lots of veggies along with the things above and never failing to go at the time my body tells me its ready help to solve the problem for me.
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Old 04-09-2013, 08:40 PM   #41
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chia seed pudding helped me, flax helped my friend
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