Low Carb Friends  
Netrition.com - Tools - Reviews - Faces - Recipes - Home


Go Back   Low Carb Friends > Main Lowcarb Lobby
Register FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 09-25-2008, 10:31 AM   #1
Blabbermouth!!!
 
sbarr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Albany, NY
Posts: 5,251
Gallery: sbarr
Stats: 220/178.2/135 (11-Sept)
WOE: Nutritional Ketosis (18 carb/70 protein/116 fat)
Start Date: Jan 2005/Jan 2011/Oct 2012/Jan 2014 - bah!!
Raising Healthy LC children

I'm starting this thread with the hope that it become a sticky somewhere that we can continue to refer, post, encourage. This is not intended to be a debate about children on Atkins, but how we successfully raise our children to be healthy eaters. As we come to this site, we look for suggestions, encouragement, ideas for ourselves and we should be doing the same for our loved ones.

I look forward to seeing posts and success stories about children who are taught eat well and make good decisions.

Sandra

Last edited by sbarr; 09-25-2008 at 10:36 AM..
sbarr is offline   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old 09-25-2008, 10:32 AM   #2
Blabbermouth!!!
 
sbarr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Albany, NY
Posts: 5,251
Gallery: sbarr
Stats: 220/178.2/135 (11-Sept)
WOE: Nutritional Ketosis (18 carb/70 protein/116 fat)
Start Date: Jan 2005/Jan 2011/Oct 2012/Jan 2014 - bah!!
Myself - I will start. When I was pregnant, I tried to stay moderate carb in my third trimester because of something I read about children developing taste buds. My little girl was born at 50% in height and weight.

As I BF her, I also focused on eating healthy foods so she'd enjoy the same.

As she moved to formula, I focused on organic, milk-based formula.

At 5 months, I focus on good, organic vegetables (I usually grind fresh or frozen veggies and then freeze them and portion them out for the day - cheaper than food in jars and tastes better), egg yolks, fish oil, acidophillus, often sharing a little from my plate.

I've ordered part of a half side of no pesticide grass-fed beef for us now and later when she starts eating meat so she gets no pesticides or hormones.

I will try to focus on taking her to healthy grocery stores and if we do ever go to a big store, we'll stay on the end aisles with real food.
__________________
Don't worry about momentary cheats or stumbles, focus on succeeding in the long run. Always keep your eye on the target and if you stumble, get back up and stay in the race.

What we weigh is the result of a meal, a day, a week, a month, a year of choices...

Psssst...Nothing tastes as good as ketosis feels!

Last edited by sbarr; 09-25-2008 at 10:39 AM..
sbarr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2008, 11:19 AM   #3
Senior LCF Member
 
binga's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: never cold here
Posts: 898
Gallery: binga
WOE: low carb
Start Date: jan every year
I'm in. I take care of 3 very small children,so I'll be reading here each day. Today we had fresh green beans,sliced pear ,and plain yogurt with baby food peaches.
binga is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2008, 11:31 AM   #4
MAJOR LCF POSTER!
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 2,315
Gallery: DorianH
Well, feeding my kids well and teaching them well is something that I feel very strongly about. I have a very tough relationship with food and a long history of eating disorders and poor choices. I do NOT want my kids to struggle as I have had. Already, I can see the effects on my kids- they eat and enjoy their food, but they do not overindulge. My son will ask for a treat (fruit) if he is still hungry after dinner. If he's not hungry, he doesn't ask for it. Sometimes this ability has me in awe- I am not able to function this way. I have some hard and fast rules for eating in our house. It works for us and I have seen success so far:

1. My children have never had candy, processed foods, or soda. I plan to keep it that way as long as I possibly can.
2. I offer a variety of foods but do not force them to eat anything. Dinner always includes a protein, veggie, and a fruit for dessert if they want it.
3. They drink cow's milk and fluoridated water only. No juices or soda.
4. No distractions during dinner- the TV and radio must be off and everyone sits at the table until everyone is done.
5. The kids get a small reward if they choose to try a new, healthy food.
6. The hardest part is at school and parties: I do not allow them to eat candy, cupcakes, etc. If there is a party on a particular day I pack a special treat for them so they don't feel left out.

Maybe my rules seem a bit strict, but it's just so important to me. And, it's working! My kids stop eating when they're satisfied, they are a proper weight, they have beautiful teeth, they sleep well, they are in a good mood (most of the time ), and they have no desire for junk food.
DorianH is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2008, 12:06 PM   #5
Way too much time on my hands!
 
suzanneyea's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Montreal, QC
Posts: 11,224
Gallery: suzanneyea
Stats: 156/124/120
WOE: Vlc
The best changes I have made are cutting out juice and processed foods. Andrew is 5 1/2 and I allow him to make a lot of his own choices. We talk about health and nutrition a lot, so he knows the facts. If we are out and he asks for a candy, I always remind him about the health risks and let him make the choice, I always offer a healthy option. My success story is last week, he was offered a donut at church and he said "no thanks, I am really hungry and when I eat donuts I am still hungry after I eat it."
I keep our house junk free, so that is half the battle and I lead by example. He never sees me eat candy, McDonalds, nothing like that.
suzanneyea is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2008, 12:13 PM   #6
Major LCF Poster!
 
Tiffany2288's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: NYC/NJ
Posts: 1,905
Gallery: Tiffany2288
Stats: 172/141/130 5'4
WOE: Atkins 72
Start Date: Oct 2010
sbarr.....your little girl is GORGEOUS!!!

My mom HATES all veggies but she was a HUGE propnent of making her own baby food when I was born.....she would pre-cook on sundays or at night, she would boil or steam every type of veggie, throw it in a blender or food processor, then freeze it in ice cube trays. She then took the ice cubes out and froze them in labled ziploc bags and would take 2-3 out, heat them up and feed me. She is a firm believer that by doing this it helped me eat more organically and I developed a love for all veggies.

She didn't do this with my brother bec she didn't have the time and he isn't nearly the veggie eater that I am. I plan on doing this with my future children as well.
Tiffany2288 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2008, 01:10 PM   #7
MAJOR LCF POSTER!
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 2,315
Gallery: DorianH
Quote:
Originally Posted by suzanneyea View Post
so that is half the battle and I lead by example.
Absolutely!!
DorianH is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2008, 01:18 PM   #8
Way too much time on my hands!
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 16,048
Gallery: fawn
The best things you can do for your children are whole fresh foods and teaching them the difference between life giving foods and life taking foods. Something I have learned on my journey and looking back at my children and their learning disabilities, ADD/ADHD, crooked teeth, crooked jaw, poor eyesight and one with eye/light sensitivity and finally, my oldest who is obese. I am ashamed to admit that she knew how to say fries and juice (soda) from her carseat as we passed Wendy's. I can't help but think that everything I have read on the Weston Price site as well as the myriad of other books by Falon, Enig and the like, I am responsible for all of these maladies my children suffer.

I don't just "think" I know I'm responsible. With that being said, I have apologized to each of my adult children and have made a promise to them that I will always be there unconditionally for their children to help guide through healthy preparation, pregnancy and child rearing for their children.

Everyone is so afraid to say anything to their children because they're afraid that child might become eating disordered but that's like allowing the kid to ride his bike without a helmet because the helmet makes him look less cool. We owe it to our children to educate them and not allow the media to fill their little brains through the television. You figure they see approximately 4-6 commercials 4-6 times during one tv show and the majority are food commercials.

Parents have it very hard right now. One of the most valuable things parents can do at home is teach their children the rights and wrongs with fueling their bodies. Sadly, most Americans are over weight, over tired and over worked. They themselves don't have the tools or education.

Something interesting that I've learned about myself and my children (I suffered extreme ADHD with slight terret/OCD behavior I also had major food cravings...not sugar but fat and sugar. creamy, fried, sweet, salty) The correlation between that and my diet? My mother believed in the Pritikin theory. No fat. I was fat deprived therefore I was EFA deficient. This deficiency affected everything I did. It actually carried over into my adulthood. I have a confession to make. My schooling this time is the only thing I have ever completed. (I"m not quite done but working on my final diligently) I'm not kidding!!! I focused, I worked hard, I studied and I am almost complete with my certification. I would have never finished without my beloved information based on fat, EFA's and a balanced body/mind.

I share this because my life as an ADHD child could have been very different, less humiliating and less stressful had I known what I know now. I was a statistic of the ADD/ADHD world. I was addicted to drugs, had 2 children by the time I was 19 and constantly scrambled to fix what I had procrastinated. An unbalanced check book, a past due electric bill, the list of frustrations go on. Same with my children.

I hope this helps some of you new Moms just based on my own personal experience.

Oh by having your EFA's in order? You and your children will notice that cravings are just not there. Your daughters during mentruation can have less cramps which is a huge complaint right now among teenage girls.

Vegetable oils, sugars, msg and Trans Fats are dragging this society down. It's time to turn it around with new generations!
fawn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2008, 01:31 PM   #9
Very Gabby LCF Member!!!
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 4,135
Gallery: Margot 65
I have so many things to add to this thread! I am very passionate about wholesome and natural WHOLE foods for kids of all ages.

My Baby J is ONE today... she is 100% grain/gluten free, sugar free (well except that bite of a timbit that day LOL) she eats meat and eggs and plain yogurt. She eats EVCO and CLO off the spoon. She eats asparagus, brocolli, cauliflower and (very little) fruits and LOVES blueberries, bananas and has been known to eat an entire peach right down to the pit. She eats steak and chicken and pork and turkey.. (I merely cut it into cheerio sized pieces) and has been known to eat more than my DD9 sometimes!

She has NEVER been spoon fed, she prefers to self feed and self moderate. She only got her first tooth 2 weeks ago, so when she does get teeth she is well versed in how to chew (and never once choked, only gagged once when she took too big of a bite of something..)

Her food is never ground, mashed or pureed, and has been eating this way since she was 6 months old.

She get's goat's milk or formula, and I also mix some full fat coconut milk in her bottles with the formula.

here she is at 10 months, chowing down on a rib... you would have an easier time prying a bone out of my 125lb Rottie's mouth, than trying to get her to give it up.




I am off to bake her a SF, gluten/dairy free banana cake for her birthday! I will have much more to say when I have more time
Margot 65 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2008, 01:38 PM   #10
Very Gabby LCF Member!!!
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 4,135
Gallery: Margot 65
Fawn, I do not think I have ever been as emotionally impacted by a post like the post you just made here.

I know we need to make some changes, and if it means educating and empowering the Moms we have here, it will make a difference no matter how small.

We have been misled, misinformed, robbed and cheated... and as easy as it has made our lives at times, the payoff in the end is SO.NOT.WORTH.IT.

We only get ONE chance to raise our kids, and like you.. I wish I knew then what I know now.

Take this chance we have now, it is the best darned gift we can give our kids for LIFE.

(((fawn))) I am so very grateful to be a part of this.
Margot 65 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2008, 01:59 PM   #11
Blabbermouth!!!
 
sbarr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Albany, NY
Posts: 5,251
Gallery: sbarr
Stats: 220/178.2/135 (11-Sept)
WOE: Nutritional Ketosis (18 carb/70 protein/116 fat)
Start Date: Jan 2005/Jan 2011/Oct 2012/Jan 2014 - bah!!
binga/Dorian/Suzanne/Tiffany - thank you! Success in action!

Fawn - Please know that you have impacted many lives. Lindsey has much to thank you for as will others who are moved by that post!

Prozak - after I wiped my tears away, I laughed at your post with little J's greasy face and thought of her battling a Rottie for a bone. I'm also interested in your self-feeding approach. Lindsey's food has been mashed, but I want to take a step back and re-evaluate that; it makes a lot of sense that she eat slower and be more in control of her own eating. It's never too late! Wish her a happy birthday for me!
sbarr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2008, 02:01 PM   #12
Way too much time on my hands!
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 16,048
Gallery: fawn
Thank you Margot. My journey has also led me to friendships like yours and Sandra's and the many others on this board. For that, I am forever grateful.

Baby J what a cutie pie she is and Happy Birthday to our lovely little cavewoman.
fawn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2008, 02:11 PM   #13
Major LCF Poster!
 
kbeth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Chicago
Posts: 1,626
Gallery: kbeth
Stats: 5'4" 43yo 161/148/125
WOE: Paleo-esque
Start Date: April 2002/Restart April 2012
Wow...nice to be among those who are also passionate about this subject.
I almost cried when I read Fawn's description of her life pre-nourishment-knowledge. I also suffered greatly as a teen and young adult with ADD (and depression) I sooo wish I had known then what a difference the right foods/supplements make.
I am eternally grateful that I was already on the ball by the time I got pregnant. My DS- now 28 months- is unbelievably healthy and I feel that the foods I ate while pg, and the foods he receives now are the reason why.
I look forward to trading info/experiences with you.
Prozak...Happy Birthday to that sweet lil babe!!
__________________
<---Avatar Summer 2009. Soooo close to goal and then had a mad, passionate weekend with sugar. Let me be a lesson to you. Not sure you're strong enough to cheat and then get right back on plan?? Then don't do it!!
kbeth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2008, 02:32 PM   #14
Major LCF Poster!
 
Blood Sugar 101's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: New England
Posts: 2,839
Gallery: Blood Sugar 101
Stats: 1998-2009 170/142/145---2010 138/142/138
WOE: 80-100g per day. Metformin (no more prandin!)
Start Date: First LC diet 1998, goal 2003, continual vigilance
One very important thing with kids is NOT to make what they eat an arena in which you battle for control. Little kids will pretty much do what you make them do. But if they perceive something as YOURs, when they get to be teens, that will be a prime area of revolt.

So if eating "healthy" is MOM's thing and MOM insists they do it, well, be prepared for teens who go way out of their way to eat crap.

My approach was to feed my kids home cooked food when they were little with no soda in the house. Then when they were school age I'd eat the way I eat, explain the reasons why, but if the kids wanted to eat something and asked for it, I would get it for them (within reason.)

My kids knew the theory, and they made pretty good choices, but they also did their share of eating junk because they were teens.

I have seen parents make food into a battle with kids and it isn't pretty. I figured that if the kids understood that what they ate was indeed up to them, and knew some basic physiology, it was going to work out a lot better than if "eating good" meant "Doing what MOM says I have to do."
Blood Sugar 101 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2008, 02:39 PM   #15
Senior LCF Member
 
claire26's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 230
Gallery: claire26
Stats: 203/173/132
WOE: Atkins
Start Date: May 2008
I don't have any children yet, but one of the main reasons I began to change how I eat was because I was scared that I a) would not be able to have children due to PCOS, and b) that if I did have children they would really be negatively effected by my diet and example.

Happily I am well on the road to getting myself in order, and I am so grateful to have all this information for when I do have children. I'm making notes of all this information for when we start having children so I can give them the best start possible.

I also just have to mention this to you, Fawn. I think you are just incredible. You seem to care about everyone so much, even people you don't know. Your time on this board has been the single biggest factor in me making a huge change to how I eat and even think about food. Your thoughtful advice on this board has encouraged me to switch to organic produce, grass-fed meats and dairy, coconut oil and saturated fats, and completely eliminate vegetable oils, MSG, and trans-fats from my and my husband's diets. I feel better than I ever have before, and thanks to you and others on this board I now believe that my future and my husbands future will be a healthy one. I never thought that would have been possible in the past.

Anyway, I just wanted to tell you in case you didn't know how big an impact your advice has on people like me. Honestly I think you're making such a huge difference to so many lives and I just wanted to thank you.

Anyway, sorry for getting so soppy! I just thought this was a good time to mention it
claire26 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2008, 02:41 PM   #16
Senior LCF Member
 
claire26's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 230
Gallery: claire26
Stats: 203/173/132
WOE: Atkins
Start Date: May 2008
PS. Happy birthday Baby J – cutest little girl in town!!
claire26 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2008, 02:50 PM   #17
Senior LCF Member
 
claire26's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 230
Gallery: claire26
Stats: 203/173/132
WOE: Atkins
Start Date: May 2008
I don't have any children yet, but one of the main reasons I began to change how I eat was because I was scared that I a) would not be able to have children due to PCOS, and b) that if I did have children they would really be negatively effected by my diet and example.

Happily I am well on the road to getting myself in order, and I am so grateful to have all this information for when I do have children. I'm making notes of all this information for when we start having children so I can give them the best start possible.

I also just have to mention this to you, Fawn. I think you are just incredible. You seem to care about everyone so much, even people you don't know. Your time on this board has been the single biggest factor in me making a huge change to how I eat and even think about food. Your thoughtful advice on this board has encouraged me to switch to organic produce, grass-fed meats and dairy, coconut oil and saturated fats, and completely eliminate vegetable oils, MSG, and trans-fats from my and my husband's diets. I feel better than I ever have before, and thanks to you and others on this board I now believe that my future and my husbands future will be a healthy one. I never thought that would have been possible in the past.

Anyway, I just wanted to tell you in case you didn't know how big an impact your advice has on people like me. Honestly I think you're making such a huge difference to so many lives and I just wanted to thank you.

Anyway, sorry for getting so soppy! I just thought this was a good time to mention it
claire26 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2008, 02:51 PM   #18
Blabbermouth!!!
 
sbarr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Albany, NY
Posts: 5,251
Gallery: sbarr
Stats: 220/178.2/135 (11-Sept)
WOE: Nutritional Ketosis (18 carb/70 protein/116 fat)
Start Date: Jan 2005/Jan 2011/Oct 2012/Jan 2014 - bah!!
BS101 - I'm glad you posted. You've raised a very good point. Reminds me of when I was a teen, the alcohol drinking children of Mormons, drank a LOT since it there wasn't a concept of drinking responsibly! If something is taboo, it's oh so enticing.

I'm hoping that I can create a casual environment of: "no big deal, this is the way things are - this is what food is all about, it is to be enjoyed and to understand how it impacts our bodies - this is how we eat" and she can develop good taste buds, brain cells while I have a chance - and then as she grows, we have a garden (children will often try what they help grow and cook) and she can develop tastes and pride in good food.

I'm looking forward to more posts on how children can be raised, both early on - eat the right foods for development and taste and later on, about making good decisions.

Last edited by sbarr; 09-25-2008 at 02:55 PM..
sbarr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2008, 02:53 PM   #19
Major LCF Poster!
 
Tiffany2288's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: NYC/NJ
Posts: 1,905
Gallery: Tiffany2288
Stats: 172/141/130 5'4
WOE: Atkins 72
Start Date: Oct 2010
Fawn...how is it possible that you have adult children when you look 25 yrs old yourself? WOW! You're a beauty!

Last edited by Tiffany2288; 09-25-2008 at 02:55 PM..
Tiffany2288 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2008, 03:02 PM   #20
Senior LCF Member
 
claire26's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 230
Gallery: claire26
Stats: 203/173/132
WOE: Atkins
Start Date: May 2008
Sorry about the triple post – my Firefox keeps on crashing when I try to submit posts. I think that's what's doing it
claire26 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2008, 03:12 PM   #21
Very Gabby LCF Member!!!
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 4,135
Gallery: Margot 65
Breakfast ideas!!

One of the best things we can do is to send our kids off into the world with a lower carb, high fat and great protein breakfast.

Really.. they will not know what hit them. The change is almost shocking when you realize how they do not clamor for a sugary snack within an hour of eating.

I do want to mention, that it has been shown that a child who has eaten a HIGH CARB (SAD) breakfast, will have a LOWER blood sugar reading within an hour or so after eating, than a child who ate nothing at all. So, the theory that 'any breakfast is good as long as it is food' just flies out the window considering low blood sugar is NOT a healthy state of body or mind.

Tropical Tornado:

1 egg (organic free range)
1/4 frozen banana
1/4 cup coconut milk (full fat) or milk or goat's milk or 1TB of cream
1/3 cup OJ (pure 100% nothing added preferably home-squeezed.. they might like to do that themselves!)
1/2 cup ice

while it is blending slooooowly add 2tsp melted ECVO

My kids LOVE these, even hubby LOL.. I serve them this with 2 thick slices of bacon for breakfast and they eat/drink every drop and crumb!!

And rarely do they eat their morning recess snack (which is whole food as well.... NOTHING refined or processed)
Margot 65 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2008, 03:37 PM   #22
Way too much time on my hands!
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 16,048
Gallery: fawn
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiffany2288 View Post
Fawn...how is it possible that you have adult children when you look 25 yrs old yourself? WOW! You're a beauty!
oh you are kind Tiffany. My kiddies are 26, 24, and 20. I was 24 by the time I had my 3 kids. Explains the irresponsible feeding for sure!

As I told you Sandra in a PM, I'll share here as well.
I went to a childhood obesity clinic last week and one of the guest speakers was a County Nutritionist for the Public Health department here in Sonoma Co. Just as most of us were raised in the "Old Days" this gal is raising her child the same. Eating out is a treat not a right. While she despises fast food as I do, her little girl gets a happy meal once a month.

If you are going to treat children, I think the best way to do it is with high quality treats not the cheap stuff. This will then help to establish a sophisticated palate. That can begin at a very young age which Baby J has proven in the past right Margot?
fawn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2008, 04:56 PM   #23
Way too much time on my hands!
 
suzanneyea's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Montreal, QC
Posts: 11,224
Gallery: suzanneyea
Stats: 156/124/120
WOE: Vlc
Ready for a scandle? Sometimes my son goes to school without breakfast!!!! Shocking, I know. I ask him if he is hungry and sometimes, just like the rest of us, he is not hungry at 8am. I just pack extra cheese in his snack for school. I will never force my child to eat when he is not hungry. I mean I pick him up for lunch at 11:30 anyway and school only starts at 9:05, he will certainly not starve to death.
suzanneyea is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2008, 06:43 PM   #24
MAJOR LCF POSTER!
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 2,315
Gallery: DorianH
Prozak- I'm with you! Breakfast is my kids' best meal of the day. They usually eat a pretty light dinner, so they eat a hearty breakfast and a pretty good lunch, which I pack. They have a yogurt smoothie just about every morning....I sneak in all kinds of good stuff.

Since everyone else posted, I figured I'd add my two munchkins too



DorianH is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2008, 08:29 PM   #25
Way too much time on my hands!
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 16,048
Gallery: fawn
Oh Dorian, they're absolutely beautiful. Thank you for sharing.
fawn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2008, 09:27 PM   #26
something there
 
cleochatra's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Denver, Colorado
Posts: 14,736
Gallery: cleochatra
Stats: 364/233/125 5'5" [44]
WOE: Atkins '72
Start Date: August 31, 2012
To speak to the difficulty in raising kids in a high-gluten, high-carbohydrate world is an understatement. An even greater challenge lies especially when they tend to share the same sugar issues/cravings/crashes we parents experience.

As we find we are increasingly gluten intolerant (and so are they), or diabetic (and they're now predisposed genetically due to varying factors), or just looking to change the way you eat in order to positively affect your health and the health of the younger generation in your home, we are faced with a very real challenge: winning kids over to healthy living.

Regardless of reason for dietary changes in a household, it remains difficult to work with kids in making changes. Because they’re kids, they don’t necessarily appreciate healthy choices as much as they like having Wheat Bites for a snack-- because they've always had Wheat Bites for a snack.

Following are some ideas for keeping your crew happy while they chew:

Slow Ride. Whereas adults can more quickly shift to a different style of eating, kids thrive on routine and knowing what to expect. If, for them, breakfasts have always been Poptarts or Froot Charms, you're not going to be able to enthuse your progeny with a sudden bowl of steel cut oatmeal one fine morning. In fact, a rebellion will most likely ensue as the fear of further change creeps in. Start by trying an acceptable substitute for a snack item in the house instead of a major (and traditionally high-carbohydrate) meal such as breakfast.


Take it Easy. Unless you are dealing with an immediate need due to intolerances or allergies, change one snack item at a time as opposed to removing all pastas, cereals, crackers, breads and rices from the home simultaneously. You might be able to substitute Wasa crisp breads for the Wheat Bites, but don't also attempt to change out all pastas and cereals that same day. Help kids ease into transitions by still allowing for their standby favorite of strawberry cream cheese on the Wasa, and you are making slow, less threatening changes.


Stock foods in the house which are healthy...and, more importantly, liked. “Liked” is the key term. If you are bringing hummus leather into the home, and your kids hate hummus leather, expect a battle if you expect them to do anything more than fling at against the wall like a wacky glass walker. On the other hand, kids can see a fun food, like string cheese, and they're more likely to follow suit and mimic positive snacking behaviors. When there is something they like, and if it's acceptable, higher-protein/fat/health/less processed, go for it. Foods like nuts, cheeses, olives, fresh vegetables, berries and jerky are viable options, especially when they can be purchased without added sugars or nitrates (or other problematic preservatives).

Baby Steps. Start by incorporating part of something into a meal, rather than instituting a change of mammoth proportions (especially if your kids aren’t used to eating mammoths). If your family is accustomed to mashed potatoes, adding 1/4 mashed cauliflower to the potatoes is a great beginning. Over time, continue to increase the amount of cauliflower ratio to the potatoes allows the taste buds adapt while instituting a healthier choice for fiber in a dinner side dish. A friend of mine began incorporating small amounts of spaghetti squash to her pots of spaghetti. Now, they are currently at the half-way mark! Remember: Change is change, regardless how slow it might seem.

Critics, Please! Engage your kids in meaningful conversation about what they really like and don't like about a meal. If the mashed cauliflower was a bust because it was too milky the last time, listen. This time, try a little garlic salt and cream cheese instead of the butter and milk (the milk made it too runny anyway). Enlisting kids as taste testers helps ease the "I tell you to eat it--so eat it!" mentality and allows them to be more willing to try something two--or even three-- times.

’One bite per year’ rule. At my dinner table, there is a rule: one bite (for the pensive, they’re usually miniscule) per year of age. It is easy to decide that turnip fries are unacceptable in name. One taste tells them that the texture is different. That's not enough. Give a kid time for their taste buds to consider the food. Serving a small helping rather than a big ‘blop’ allows them to feel they finished most of a portion rather than the usual lamenting about the wasting of food.

Rarely Trick. Sometimes, while it might be easy to sneak healthy things into their meals, don't lie to kids. If they ask if there are beets in the cheesecake, be honest. Don’t necessarily volunteer the information, but build a level of food trust with kids. Respect them, their intelligence, and their input. In return, they will reward you with respect and a more open mind for broccoli as a pizza crust ingredient.

Sometimes treat. The kids with the most stringent religions are the ones who sometimes tend to rebel. The same goes for Susie, who is told that never again will another chocolate bar pass her little lips. Unless there is an actual allergy, food intolerance, or medically-mandated change, there is nothing wrong with the occasional McDonald's French fry. The key is to not make an off-plan item or meal an 'event', lest kids grow up thinking that Happy Meals make them truly happy, or that food is a celebration (and not fuel for the body’s engine).

If at first you don’t succeed... No matter how hard we have labored in the kitchen, certain foods will probably never be able to take the place of other foods. No matter how many times you tried to wrap your riced cauliflower in nori in an effort to make low glycemic load sushi, you ended up with a gum eraser that smelled like sweaty feet. Accepting that some foods (like rice) are what the sushi requires will help you to either realize that you never missed the food in the first place or that you appreciate it all the more for what it is. Go ahead and use the lower-carb white bread or the low-carb wraps-- albeit sparingly— for the lunch sandwiches, but never make a special occasion out of a food you don’t want kids to associate with happiness.


Food for Fuel. Of course, most importantly, is to instill that eating should be for hunger, and never for reasons of boredom, comfort or sadness—and never as a celebration or as reward (‘I deserve this’). Masking any emotion with food or eating when not hungry, helps to create difficult-to-break patterns of mindless eating, or eating as a response to environmental stimulus as opposed to eating due to bodily needs. Even healthy snacks, eaten en masse, can be stored in the body for fat when the fuel isn’t needed. When what we eat becomes a celebrational chowa-thon no longer is a person feeding the need for fuel; instead we’re socially downing as many crab cakes as we desire while we are regaled by Aunt Myrna’s tales of woe in the bathroom during the family Christmas party. Remember: food is fuel, and celebrations should be about the people and activities and not what passes the lips.




Make no mistake: teaching kids to make positive nutritional choices begins at home. Your kids are watching, learning and growing in accordance to your actions and your choices. Still, don’t worry when your toddler wrinkles her nose at zucchini. Be kind to yourself and to your kids, and you will give rise to a new generation of conscientious eaters who will fuel their growing bodies with the right kinds of meals. And who knows? Maybe they’ll be able to out-cook you in the kitchen before they’re asking for the car keys.

from Examiner.com
__________________
Jamie

I've lost 131 pounds

My rinky dink blog for thinky thoughts and things of absolutely no consequence.
cleochatra is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2008, 09:28 PM   #27
something there
 
cleochatra's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Denver, Colorado
Posts: 14,736
Gallery: cleochatra
Stats: 364/233/125 5'5" [44]
WOE: Atkins '72
Start Date: August 31, 2012
It was June the last time I looked.

With school around the corner, parents are grappling for the first time with students and a low-carbohydrate, and possibly gluten-free lifestyle.

Whereas in the past, we may have looked to peanut butter and jelly sandwiches or the school lunches we were used to having kids purchase (what was that batter-fried stuff anyway?), suddenly options might seem dismally limiting for little people whose one-time use of processed products kept life serene, tossing bags of fruit snacks and chips into small sacks along with those peanut butter and jelly sandwiches.

Fear not. As kids grow, life may become more complicated, but lunches just got easier.

In fact, even if your wee ones are abiding by a lower or moderate carb regimen for reasons of health or food intolerances, it is still easy to shuffle them out of the door on time without sacrificing your sanity.

1. Ban the bread. Whether there is an intolerance to wheat or not, there's just not enough fiber in bread to keep a young stomach full for an entire day. Add any measurable amount of sugar, and suddenly, bread becomes pals with the glucose, and they happily short-circuit from the small intestines back into the bloodstream, rather than digesting nicely and keeping your child full for the day. Even diet breads tend to contain artificial sweeteners, and since it's not perfectly known what the long-term ramifications of their use are, it's better to avoid diet breads altogether.

Instead try... No gluten intolerance? Then look to low-carb burrito wraps and sandwich wraps as a bread substitution. A wrap is a quick and fun way to prepare a sandwich for kids. If you have a child with gluten issues, look, instead, to crispy lettuce wraps, flax muffins, oopsie rolls or flax crackers packed with a Lunchables-type array, with small meats and cheeses.*

2. Skip the chips. It is so easy at 5:30 am, while you're mind is still attempting to wrap itself around the first cup of coffee, to insert a bag of a processed potato item into lunch sacks. After all, they are potatoes, in some form. Or were. With virtually no fiber to be found in those bags of crisps (only 1.2 grams for 8 ounces), there are better ways to get the crunch on for that many carbs.

Instead try... Fresh vegetables. I know it sounds unromantic, but by letting kids choose which vegetables they want to start, and branching out from there will feel like less of a drudgery. Those bright, colorful carrots and crunchy celery sticks might not seem initially enticing next to Bob's ruffled potato chips, but veggies contain much more fiber and vitamins per cacophanous bite. Include a high-fat dip or 2 Tbsp peanut butter to add flavor while limiting the condiment.

3. Forget the Fruit Snacks. With a large concentration of high-fructose corn syrup, fruit snacks are not the easy replacement many parents may think they are as a healthy fruit dessert. Carefully molded into shapes like Spongebob Squarepants and in colors so bright Crayola could cringe, these bits of sugared candy are not a fresh and fibrous lunch chaser, containing 15.55 grams of sugar and no fiber per small pouch.

Instead try... Fresh, fruit. Nature's bounty is pretty amazing. Organic, ripe strawberries (in fact any berries), grapes, cantaloupe and other easy-to-pack fruits make a fantastic finish to fresh fare. Make sure to wash fruit before packing, as little hands will happily pop bits of kiwi into their mouths where once gummy animals peeked out from between teeth. Refrain from fruit juices, which remove the fiber necessary to offset the fructose (which could lend towards hunger later on).

Examiner.com
cleochatra is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2008, 09:32 PM   #28
something there
 
cleochatra's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Denver, Colorado
Posts: 14,736
Gallery: cleochatra
Stats: 364/233/125 5'5" [44]
WOE: Atkins '72
Start Date: August 31, 2012
There's nothing like shopping for school supplies to get the year started off right. And because we're packing healthier lunches for those kids-a-go-go, it is important to shop for containers which will keep those hot foods hot and those cold foods cold.

One option? Bento.

Bento lunch boxes are Japanese lunch boxes ranging from cute and cuddly to no-nonsense holders of traveling foods (one serving).

Bento originated in the late Kamakura Period of Japan with the advent of cooked, dried rice. As culture became more refined, onigiri (shaped rice patties, usually with a small piece of dried fruit or fish tucked inside) was added. The first ekiben was sold in train stations, perfect for nourishment on the go, and because schools did not provide lunches, students began toting their own.

Bento, waning during the Taisho Period due to the scarcity of aluminum for the boxes, made its resurgance in the 1980's, and has kept its rightful place in many a heart, if not a stomach. If you've ever seen them, they are very cute. They usually stack 2-3 tiers high and can be used for individuals or for groups. Collecting the boxes is as addicting as making the bento.

Japanese anime has largely helped bring this mania for cute, small portions to the United States and to other countries.

As seen in the picture to the left (source), bento boxes can be as simple as a plastic storage container. The art is in the presentation and organization.

Because the food portions are very small, cooking takes place for the preparation of the lunch boxes, and foods can be kept cold or warm or served at room temperature. School lunches are fun, but not as healthy as we would like, and because we tend towards lower glycemic load, readers will be seeing your favorite columnist (teeth gleam insertion here) experimenting and having a great time making different foods for the kids. I don't want them to totally rebel, so I'm combining foods for them as I wean them down to largely healthy food items.

Still, bento! I am so addicted to you! I must have your condiment containers shaped like puppies! I need those little fish-shaped soy bottles! The littlefurikake dispenser! The bands in various colors for my many moods of bento.

I must have the monkey-faced mayonnaise containers. The cute food picks. The paper grass dividers. I've never been more excited to try fish sauce, toast my sesame seeds or cook small portions of food for one meal.

If it's a sickness, don't call the doctor. I'll be over here hugging my Sailor Moon lunch towel in the corner and nibbling my fruit cup with Hello Kitty chopsticks.

Pictures for the article here
cleochatra is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2008, 09:33 PM   #29
something there
 
cleochatra's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Denver, Colorado
Posts: 14,736
Gallery: cleochatra
Stats: 364/233/125 5'5" [44]
WOE: Atkins '72
Start Date: August 31, 2012
I can do more than C&P my own articles, but I worked for 10 hours today, wrote for another two and need to be lazy for another 1. I will be back with some fresh content.
cleochatra is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2008, 03:31 AM   #30
Way too much time on my hands!
 
suzanneyea's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Montreal, QC
Posts: 11,224
Gallery: suzanneyea
Stats: 156/124/120
WOE: Vlc
Now, I have made lots of positive changes in my son's diet, but I still have this weird desire to "treat" him to things like a candy bar or McDonalds. I hardly ever act on it, but I still do it. Why? I would never ever eat candy, just would not put that in my body. But, the other day I was paying for the gas and I asked my son if he wanted a candy bar??? I spent all this time and effort to keep a healthy diet and then I do weird things like that? It seems I stiil see certain junk foods as a yummy, I am not sure. I am working very hard not to act on these impulses, but they are certainly there.
suzanneyea is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 07:35 AM.


Copyright ©1999-2014 Friends Forums LLC. All rights reserved. - Terms of Service | Privacy Policy
LowCarbFriends® is a registered mark of Friends Forums, LLC.