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-   -   Gluten-Free, Low-Carb Gingersnap Recipe (http://www.lowcarbfriends.com/bbs/low-carb-recipe-help-suggestions/813989-gluten-free-low-carb-gingersnap-recipe.html)

Ginaaaaaa 10-05-2013 02:20 PM

Gluten-Free, Low-Carb Gingersnap Recipe
 
1 Attachment(s)
I made these gingersnap cookies and they came out so good!! The edges get crispy and they're chewy. They actually make a snap sound when you break them in half. They have the perfect gingersnap taste and texture!

This recipe was inspired by a graham cracker recipe found on All Day I Dream About Food a blog by Carolyn Ketchum.

Trisha Gilketson from the blog Intoxicated on Life came up with this incredibly yummy gingersnap recipe. I brought them to a birthday party along with some peanut butter cookies and everyone said the gingersnaps were the best!

Gluten-Free, Low-Carb Gingersnap Recipe

Preheat oven to 250 and line a cookie sheet with parchment paper.

Ingredients
1 1/2 cups almond meal
1/2 cup flaxseed meal
1/3 cup granulated erythritol or 1/4 cup xylitol (read more about xylitol)
1/2 teaspoon pure stevia extract (read more about stevia)
2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 teaspoon ginger
1/4 teaspoon cloves
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 large egg
2 tbsp melted butter
1 Tablespoon blackstrap molasses
2 teaspoon vanilla
Directions
In a bowl, mix together almond meal, flax seed meal, erythritol, stevia, cinnamon, ginger, cloves, baking powder and salt.
Add to the above mixture butter, egg, molasses, and vanilla. Stir until it forms a dough.

Form the dough into small balls and press the balls to desired thickness. Line a cookie sheet with parchment paper and
Bake one hour or more. The baking time will depend upon how thick your dough is. Bake until the cookies are firm and edges are crispy. Turn off the oven and leave the cookies in the oven another hour.

Click on pic to enlarge

Tweaker Geek 10-05-2013 06:55 PM

Oh my, Gina, I love me some gingersnaps! I've tried and tweaked quite a few recipes for low carb ones and haven't gotten a real good "snap". It looks like the low temperature, long baking time may be the answer. I will definitely be trying these!

Ginaaaaaa 10-05-2013 07:09 PM

I hope you do try them, I think you will like these. They're yummy with a cup of pumpkin coffee. I've been told to bring the gingersnap and peanut butter cookies to the next get together.

Oh shoot, I need to ask a mod to change the butter to 2 tbsp. It was a typo in the original recipe!

Tweaker Geek 10-05-2013 07:14 PM

I'm sipping on a pumpkin coffee as we speak--sure wish I had a gingersnap to go with it!:cry:

Ginaaaaaa 10-05-2013 08:34 PM

Aww I wish you lived closer I would bring you some!

Tweaker Geek 10-05-2013 09:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ginaaaaaa (Post 16632160)
Aww I wish you lived closer I would bring you some!

Me too! :hugs:

Pam 10-05-2013 09:44 PM

Gina.....1/2 t. stevia extract is equal to what sweetness equivalent?

dianafoot 10-06-2013 06:44 AM

When you say they "snap" when you break them, does that mean they are crisp or crunchy all the way through? I'm looking for some gingersnaps that are hard and crunchy.

buttoni 10-06-2013 07:01 AM

And don't they look pretty! I love gingersnaps and had copied several recipes to start trying out to get to gingersnap heaven. Looks like I'll be starting out with yours, Gina. They look lovely!

Ginaaaaaa 10-06-2013 08:52 AM

Pam- I used 1/2 cup of xylitol and about 24 drops of liquid Splenda, but I like my cookies on the sweet side. I'm not sure how much 1/2 tsp of stevia equals because I don't use it very often.

Diana- these cookies came out hard and chewy with some crunch. I baked them about 1 hour & 10 minutes. I'm sure if I baked them longer they would have been very crunchy, but I liked the hard chewy texture of these cookies. They're not easy to break apart, I carried a bag of them in my pocketbook and none broke, not the same story with the peanut butter cookies! These are hard, chewy and melt in your mouth. I like them just the way they are, but like I said, the longer you bake them the harder and crunchier they will get. It also depends how thick you make them too, the thinner they are the crunchier they will be.

Peggy- these cookies are the best low carb cookies I've made yet, with the best texture!

I hope someone tries them and reports back on their results. These will be a regular fall and winter cookie for me!!

Ginaaaaaa 10-06-2013 09:10 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Here's the link to the original graham cracker recipe that these gingersnaps were inspired by. These did come out very crunchy! I made them last year, they were very yummy and did have the crunch of a graham cracker. I rolled them out thin though and these cookies I rolled into balls then flattened. You can roll the cookies out like the crackers or flatten them more, for crunchy thin cookies. It depends how long you bake them also.

http://www.lowcarbfriends.com/bbs/lo...-crackers.html

I'm trying to capture the texture of these cookies, but I don't have the best camera. I'm using my iPhone lol

dianafoot 10-06-2013 10:57 AM

these are in the oven, baked and cooling down for the last hour before taking them out. They smell wonderful! I couldn't help but taste a hot one, soft as it is. Will report back on taste/texture in about an hour.

snowangel9 10-06-2013 12:58 PM

Hi Gina,
Thanks for posting this! I love gingersnaps! Definitely going to try these. The holidays are closing fast and these sound perfect. I always love it when non-lowcarbers like something too... :)

dianafoot 10-06-2013 01:12 PM

just ate one of these after it cooled down in the oven. They are definitely not crunchy in the traditional sense, although I baked them for a very long time. The flavor is good, but I used erythritol and Ideal and tagatose to sweeten them (can't do stevia) and I can detect that "cooling" effect.

However, I think this is a great base recipe, and I'm going to make them again and tweak. I'll dissolve the sweeteners in the liquid ingredients before adding them and I'm going to add a little more salt and ginger to the recipe to bring out the flavors. These I'll use for crust for the mini cheesecakes I'm making this afternoon!

Ginaaaaaa 10-06-2013 01:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by snowangel9 (Post 16632828)
Hi Gina,
Thanks for posting this! I love gingersnaps! Definitely going to try these. The holidays are closing fast and these sound perfect. I always love it when non-lowcarbers like something too... :)

You're welcome, I hope you like them! I love the chewiness of these cookies and the fact that they're not delicate.

Diana, I chose to use xylitol to avoid the cooling from the erythritol. If you want a crunchier cookie you will need to make thinner cookies and bake longer.

I like the chewy texture better then a really hard crunchy cookie.

dianafoot 10-06-2013 01:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ginaaaaaa (Post 16632857)
Diana, I chose to use xylitol to avoid the cooling from the erythritol. If you want a crunchier cookie you will need to make thinner cookies and bake longer.

I like the chewy texture better then a really hard crunchy cookie.

Still trying to figure this out--Ideal is xylitol (mostly), so I'll leave out the e next time or use pure x. I made them very very thin, almost see-through, and baked them forever (over an hour and a half) until they were almost too dark. Then I let them cool down in the hot oven for an hour. Now, oddly, I put one in the microwave for 25 seconds and when that one cooled a little it was better!

Thanks for the info--I'll keep trying!

Ginaaaaaa 10-06-2013 03:27 PM

That's strange, they were that thin but didn't crisp up. I made mine thicker as you can see and they got crunchy on the edges and were very chewy. Even the graham crackers I made thinner came out crunchy. Maybe try turning the oven down to 250 and baking slower would help, but I'm at a loss as to why yours didn't crisp up at all. :dunno:

Sorry they didn't work for you. :(

kalatraza 10-06-2013 11:28 PM

Goodness, these cookies look good! Ginger is one of my favorite flavors!

Diana, I'm wondering if the Tagatose keeps things from getting crunchy. I keep it for special occasion sweetening because of the cost and don't experiment so much -- end up using it more in things like puddings and such. And chocolate! But when I made cookie bars & cookies, both new recipes to me, and subbed it for 1/2 the sweetener, they weren't crispy at all. I thought it was because they were low carb recipes and I lowered the oven temp to accommodate the tagatose so it didn't overbrown, but now I wonder. . .

Soobee 10-07-2013 04:34 AM

I also think it might be the sweeteners. I read somewhere that Erythritol has a lower melting point and impedes getting a crispy cookie.

Ginaaaaaa 10-07-2013 11:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Soobee (Post 16633542)
I also think it might be the sweeteners. I read somewhere that Erythritol has a lower melting point and impedes getting a crispy cookie.

I'm not sure that the erythritol is the problem because the original graham cracker recipe uses erythritol and they came out crunchy. She used 3 different sweeteners so it's hard to say what prevented them from getting crunchy.

I was thinking maybe turning the oven temp down to 225 and baking at a lower temp may help.

I'm happy with the way mine came out, hard and chewy. They were eaten up and people are asking for more! I could have baked them longer for more crunch but I liked them this way.

solarpluvia 10-07-2013 01:12 PM

The soft/crisp problem might also have to do with local humidity. The humidity difference between Maine and the South is pretty signifigant most of the time. Also gas vs. electric ovens, ingredient storage and age, type of baking sheets...

Even with wheat and sugar standard recipes, there's a reason why baking is considered a science. This is why all commercial bakeries use weights instead of volume to measure, and the huge bakeries store and age flour in climate controlled conditions to get consistant results.

Erythritol has a high melting point point, so it may not get hot enough to melt all the way, and it can recrystalize into larger crystals. Xylitol is a little better, closer to sugar in my experience. Tagatose has a lower point than sugar, which is why when using it in large proportion it is necessary to decrease baking temperature, but has no cooling taste like either E or X. And they all seem to attract water from the environment even more than sugar.

As an experiment if you want the cookies to be more crisp/crunchy/dry, you could warm up the almond and flax meals in a low oven for a while to dry them out before mixing the cookies. Just enough to evaporate the water out, until they're warmer than room temp but not actually cooked.

You could also double bake them, like biscotti. Bake once to cook, then let cool, bake again at a lower temperature to dry them out.

Ginaaaaaa 10-07-2013 01:28 PM

Wow I didn't realize there was so much to consider when baking cookies! Thanks for all that info, I'm sure it will be a big help. The double baking idea sounds good, that would probably help crisp them up.

I'm baking some more today using the xylitol, and the humidity is at 83%. I will see of it makes a difference in the outcome.

Sorry about all the confusion with the cookies, I hope others have better luck!

sligh 10-07-2013 01:41 PM

solarpluvia - I love it when someone can explain the science behind some of these cooking mysteries. Thanks for taking the time to do that. I learned quite a bit.

Ginaaaaaa 10-07-2013 03:09 PM

Mine came out hard and chewy again. I baked them for 1 hr and 10 minutes at 225 then I baked them for 35 more minutes at 250.

I love the texture of them but I forgot to add the liquid Splenda so they're not as sweet as I would have liked!

I might rebake them to see if I can get them really crunchy, but I like them just as they are.

solarpluvia 10-08-2013 12:52 AM

Glad to be of service! I've never liked cooking much, but I love to bake and took it very seriously for a while. Cookies were my special love, and this recipe sounds so yummy and reminded me of an old favorite.

My heart has kind of gone out of baking since I went LC. Most of the recipes that have gotten good results consistantly for me have flaxmeal, which I can't eat (OMG the pain) and doesn't really have a good substitute, or almond butter (hello, stall). Though I have been doing a bit with a variation of the BTF mix lately and sometimes the things come out the way I hope.

For learning about good old wheat and sugar baking, the King Arthur Baking and Cookie Companions are awesome.

Another idea for making the cookies crunchy/harder: Signifigantly lower or even omit the sugar alcohols and just use liquid splenda to make up the sweetness. In most cookie recipes, sugar acts like a liquid and is included as a liquid ingredient but doesn't add that much actual bulk, which is why fluffy granular Splenda still works in recipes. Or use coconut oil (or palm oil or even transfat free shortening) instead of butter, which is 20% water.

Trivia: The glazed looking top on brownies is basically a layer of sugar that has melted during mixing and risen to the top during baking. Which is why LC brownies don't do that.

Now I'm just babbling and need to go to bed!

Ginaaaaaa 10-08-2013 07:59 AM

Thanks solarpluvia!! :goodpost:

We'll that stinks you can't have flax! It does work really well in this recipe.

I've always liked baking from scratch so learning to bake low carb has been a welcome challenge. Low carb ingredients do work so much differently than the high carb ones.

I think the chewy results I'm getting in these cookies is partly due to the flax and the blackstrap molasses. I will have to try it with just the Splenda and see if it makes a crunchier cookie. I did use ghee in place of the butter, I think that eliminated some of the moisture. Baking them at 225 allows them to bake for a longer time, so they came out even chewier than the first time I made them. I did use more xylitol than the recipe called for too. I used 1/2 cup instead of 1/4 cup so that could be why mine didn't get crunchy. In the original graham cracker recipe I used the 1/4 of erythritol and they came out crunchy so I think you're right about the sugar alcohols.

I'm happy with the chewy results though! I think most people who do a lot of low carb baking know that usually cookies and brownies come out more cake like than the chewy texture found in high carb baked goods. I got my peanut butter cookies to come out a little chewy by adding some isomalt. I need to work on a chewy brownie next!

Thank you so much for all the information you provided solarpluvia, it really does help us out! :)

dianafoot 10-08-2013 10:50 AM

this conversation has gotten so interesting! Thank you solarpluvia and Gina for all your tips and thoughts.

I will try these again and experiment with the sweeteners. I just found this online:
"biscuits and cookies with ISOMALT absorb a negligible amount of water, enabling them to stay crisp during storage" BENEO-Palatinit > Home

I thought I might try using isomalt and liquid splenda and see how that works. I'm on a mission to get a crispy crunchy cookie!

Ginaaaaaa 10-08-2013 10:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dianafoot (Post 16635410)
this conversation has gotten so interesting! Thank you solarpluvia and Gina for all your tips and thoughts.

I will try these again and experiment with the sweeteners. I just found this online:
"biscuits and cookies with ISOMALT absorb a negligible amount of water, enabling them to stay crisp during storage" BENEO-Palatinit > Home

I thought I might try using isomalt and liquid splenda and see how that works. I'm on a mission to get a crispy crunchy cookie!


Oh, I can't wait to hear the results Diana! I never thought about using isomalt in these cookies. I hope it works!

PaminKY 10-08-2013 12:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by solarpluvia (Post 16634207)
Erythritol has a high melting point point, so it may not get hot enough to melt all the way, and it can recrystalize into larger crystals. Xylitol is a little better, closer to sugar in my experience. Tagatose has a lower point than sugar, which is why when using it in large proportion it is necessary to decrease baking temperature, but has no cooling taste like either E or X. And they all seem to attract water from the environment even more than sugar.

I'm sorry but this not true at all. Erythritol has a lower melting point which is why cookies may spread more in the oven and why I use pans with indentions in them to keep them in the shape and size I want. The melting point of E is 121C where white sugar is 186C, Xylitiol is even lower. E does have a strong tendency to recrystallize when it cools which can make it appear that it didn't melt, the addtion of some type of gum such as guar, xanthum or glucomannan helps that issue but doesn't also resolve it.

It is also non-hygroscopic which means it does not attract water so it can have a tendency to make baked goods dry which is also helped by the use of a gum but if you're wanting a dry crunchy cookie you wouldn't want to add the gum. Xylitol will absorb water.

rosethorns 10-08-2013 01:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by solarpluvia (Post 16634837)
Glad to be of service! I've never liked cooking much, but I love to bake and took it very seriously for a while. Cookies were my special love, and this recipe sounds so yummy and reminded me of an old favorite.

My heart has kind of gone out of baking since I went LC. Most of the recipes that have gotten good results consistantly for me have flaxmeal, which I can't eat (OMG the pain) and doesn't really have a good substitute, or almond butter (hello, stall). Though I have been doing a bit with a variation of the BTF mix lately and sometimes the things come out the way I hope.

For learning about good old wheat and sugar baking, the King Arthur Baking and Cookie Companions are awesome.

Another idea for making the cookies crunchy/harder: Signifigantly lower or even omit the sugar alcohols and just use liquid splenda to make up the sweetness. In most cookie recipes, sugar acts like a liquid and is included as a liquid ingredient but doesn't add that much actual bulk, which is why fluffy granular Splenda still works in recipes. Or use coconut oil (or palm oil or even transfat free shortening) instead of butter, which is 20% water.

Trivia: The glazed looking top on brownies is basically a layer of sugar that has melted during mixing and risen to the top during baking. Which is why LC brownies don't do that.

Now I'm just babbling and need to go to bed!

I'm allergic to flax. I use chia seed ground to a flour to replace the flax....I've used it in a few things and it works great.

Just a thought hope it helps.


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