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-   -   How Do You Roast Your Chicken? (http://www.lowcarbfriends.com/bbs/low-carb-recipe-help-suggestions/805441-how-do-you-roast-your-chicken.html)

evas 06-04-2013 11:15 AM

How Do You Roast Your Chicken?
 
A cooked rotisserie chicken from the grocery store has been a staple of mine for a long time. It is one of my favorite foods! However, In an effort to cut out the additives and preservatives that are found in prepared foods I would like to roast my own. There are a million different roast chicken recipes online so I was wondering if someone could point me in the direction of one that you thought actually tasted like rotisserie chicken so I can eliminate some of the trial and error I would have to go through in recipe testing. Thanks!

pocahontas 06-04-2013 11:47 AM

We prefer to "beer can" ours on the grill. You can google it for instructions.

Another great recipe is Bare Foot Contessa's Lemon and Garlic Roasted chicken. You can dress it however you wish but the basic steps give you a nice juicy bird.

Ntombi 06-04-2013 11:54 AM

Wash and dry.
Coat skin with bacon grease. Butter is good too, but bacon grease is best.
Season liberally with salt, pepper, garlic powder, paprika, cayenne pepper.
Roast at 350* until the juices fun clear.

Prepare to drool.

emel 06-04-2013 12:18 PM

Regular sized bird (4 pounds or so):
350 or 375 for about an hour, ready when thermometer reads 165.

I take an onion chunks and lemon and lime wedges and smear them with olive oil, salt, pepper, thyme, and garlic. I toss them into the cavity. Then I pour melted butter over the bird and season w/salt and pepper.

Big bird-- 7-8 lbs
as above, but 425 for 25 minutes, reduce oven to 375 and roast 60-90 min more until it reaches 165. I baste it a couple times and after awhile I put a cup of water into the bottom of the roasting pan (bird is on a rack). I do this because my husband likes gravy, but you could skip that or use the drippings for a non-flour reduced sauce or save it for soup.

Charski 06-04-2013 12:29 PM

Like Emel, I put halved lemons and onions in the cavity. I prefer mine on the Showtime Rotisserie, but you can do in the oven too.

Soften some butter and mix in some garlic powder/onion powder/ground sage or poultry seasoning.

Loosen skin carefully over breast, leg and thigh. Rub a glop of the butter in between the skin and meat, try to get it down into the thigh joint if possible. Rub any leftover butter all over the outside of the bird and sprinkle with salt and pepper.

Roast at 375* til the skin is crispy and the meat tests done - I use an instant read thermometer. It's the only way to KNOW when it's done, not under- or over-cooked!

If doing in the rotisserie, I follow the times listed on the side of the Showtime - IIRC, it's 12 minutes per pound.

Either way - it's good eats!

ravenrose 06-04-2013 12:45 PM

1. it's just never going to taste like those grocery store birds... but it will be lovely

2. I have come to the conclusion it's just better to cook individual pieces than the whole chicken. it's easier to get each piece done just so.

Jaded62 06-04-2013 01:30 PM

I rinse and dry the chicken.Place on my poultry stand in a foil lined deep lipped pan.I coat it with butter and make a mix of rosemary, blk.pepper,cayenne,sea salt.I sprinkle it on the bird and roast for an hour or one hour and a half. Depending on its size.YUMMY !!! Oh yes, on 450 degrees for 30 minutes then drop to 350.

AnitaLCing 06-06-2013 09:22 AM

Do a dry rub if you want, not necessary.

Take a crock pot and put something in the bottom to keep the chicken off the bottom. Balled up foil will work or any rack that fits in bottom of the crock pot. Set chicken in the crock pot.

Turn crock pot on and 6-8 hours later, roasted chicken. Easy peasy!

Time and temp depends on size of chicken and your crock pot. Make sure the meat has reached the correct temperature to ensure it is cooked fully.

Normally I can not pull the chicken out without it falling apart!! Very moist and tender.

Mistizoom 06-06-2013 12:46 PM

I use my Ronco Showtime rotisserie and Jane's Krazy Mixed Up Salt all over the chicken. Tastes great and very easy to make.

evas 06-06-2013 01:54 PM

I never though of a crock pot, that sounds like it might keep it super moist just like the rotisserie stuff

penguinpower 06-06-2013 04:43 PM

I love chicken roasted in my clay pot roaster - you soak the lid in water for ten minutes, then put the seasoned chicken into the base with no liquids. Skin turns out crispy and delicious and meat juicy and tender in 90 minutes. I found my clay pot roaster at a yard sale and it was only a couple of dollars so I figured no big loss if I didn't like it - now it's the only way I roast chicken.

lilbeetle 06-06-2013 06:09 PM

I like roadkill chicken :)

Take your chicken and cut up its back bone. Spread it out and break drum and wing bones and splay out the chicken so it looks like its been run over.

Make up a rub of:
1 tablespoon paprika
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
1 teaspoon onion powder
1/2 teaspoon celery salt
1/2 teaspoon sage
1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
1/2 teaspoon allspice
1/2 teaspoon oregano
1/2 teaspoon chili powder
1/2 teaspoon pepper
1/2 teaspoon basil
1/2 teaspoon marjoram

Mix well, and rub on chicken

Per Teaspoon: 6 Calories; trace Fat; trace Protein; 1g Carbohydrate; trace Dietary Fiber; 1g Net Carb

Store leftovers in an airtight container, or sealed plastic bag. I get 2 chicken worth from one mix.

Let rub marinate on chicken for an hour or so.

Bake 30 mins @400, check if it needs some oil or water, then bake another 30 mins @350.

The rub is rather red in colour and the herbs look a little like gravel rash. Hence Roadkill chicken.

Jakelilydad 06-06-2013 08:46 PM

My favorite roast chicken is nowhere near a rotisserie taste, but more herbal. I don't like the artificial taste of most rotisserie chickens.

For mine, I make a dry rub mix of:

1Tbsp dried Oregano,
1 Tbsp dried Tarragon,
2 teasp dried Thyme
1 Tbsp dried Rosemary

Sprinkle the chicken liberally with salt and pepper, then rub the herb mix all over the outside of the bird. Try to get it to stick to the bird, and not fall into the pan.

Stick a lemon, cut lengthwise into quarters, into the cavity, along with 2 - 3 smashed garlic cloves.

Put in a roasting rack, and bake at 375 F for about an hour (or 15 min per pound). Check with thermometer that it is 165 degrees.

Don't forget to let it rest at least 10 minutes after taking it out of the oven, so the juices get absorbed back into the meat. I turn mine upside down on the carving board (so the breast is down) to get more juice into the breast meat. Just flip it again before carving.

Note: the better the bird, the better it tastes. I really love the ones I get at the Farmers' Market, but they aren't cheap!

Karerose 06-07-2013 11:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ntombi (Post 16454885)
Wash and dry.

Why are you suppose to wash and dry a chicken? I know I've seen that on cooking shows, and my father probably told me to do that too, but I don't know why? You never wash and dry other meat, so why chicken? And do you wash and dry chicken pieces? I'll admit I never do that. Should I be?

metqa 06-07-2013 11:51 AM

I wash and dry my whole chicken to make sure I get any leftover feather bits off and because I want the skin to be dry so I can salt it up and get a crispier skin. also, I sometimes search for the leftover bit of liver and remove it to keep the drippings from being too discolored.

I also bake my bird at 400* for an hour with only salt on the skin and collect the fat dripping for a dipping sauce afterward.

Soobee 06-07-2013 12:26 PM

Karerose, the latest information I have read and seen on TV is that you should NOT wash your chicken. It actually spreads more germs and bacteria. You are better off putting it directly into the pan to cook. I know some people are uncomfortable with this approach, but I am happy to follow the new advice.

Ntombi 06-07-2013 12:26 PM

I always wash my poultry, whole or pieces. I wash, inspect it all over for stray pin feathers or scaly skin that hasn't been removed, things like that. I almost always find at least a couple of things to take off.

I wipe off other meats with a damp paper towel, but don't wash them in running water like I do poultry. Oh, except ham. I wash ham too.

The drying is crucial for the skin to caramelize properly.

PassionateFire 06-07-2013 12:42 PM

Google "Sticky Chicken" tastes exactly like grocery store rotisserie chicken!

metqa 06-07-2013 12:59 PM

I'm gonna cook the heck out of those germs at 400 degrees. And if they are there, some warm water has got to wash some of it away. and if there is enough there in the first place to make me sick, I'm probably just gonna get sick.

Beth2013 06-07-2013 01:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PassionateFire (Post 16460341)
Google "Sticky Chicken" tastes exactly like grocery store rotisserie chicken!

Sounds pretty easy. There are dozens of hits for Sticky Chicken, though. Is this sort of what you mean?

Directions

1.In a small bowl, mix together salt, paprika, onion powder, thyme, white pepper, black pepper, cayenne pepper, and garlic powder. Remove and discard giblets from chicken. Rinse chicken cavity, and pat dry with paper towel. Rub each chicken inside and out with spice mixture. Place 1 onion into the cavity of each chicken. Place chickens in a resealable bag or double wrap with plastic wrap. Refrigerate overnight, or at least 4 to 6 hours.

2.Preheat oven to 250 degrees F (120 degrees C).
3.Place chickens in a roasting pan. Bake uncovered for 5 hours, to a minimum internal temperature of 180 degrees F (85 degrees C). Let the chickens stand for 10 minutes before carving.

PassionateFire 06-07-2013 01:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Beth2013 (Post 16460381)
Sounds pretty easy. There are dozens of hits for Sticky Chicken, though. Is this sort of what you mean?

Directions

1.In a small bowl, mix together salt, paprika, onion powder, thyme, white pepper, black pepper, cayenne pepper, and garlic powder. Remove and discard giblets from chicken. Rinse chicken cavity, and pat dry with paper towel. Rub each chicken inside and out with spice mixture. Place 1 onion into the cavity of each chicken. Place chickens in a resealable bag or double wrap with plastic wrap. Refrigerate overnight, or at least 4 to 6 hours.

2.Preheat oven to 250 degrees F (120 degrees C).
3.Place chickens in a roasting pan. Bake uncovered for 5 hours, to a minimum internal temperature of 180 degrees F (85 degrees C). Let the chickens stand for 10 minutes before carving.

That's the one! The drippings are to die for!

emel 06-08-2013 08:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by evas (Post 16458704)
I never though of a crock pot, that sounds like it might keep it super moist just like the rotisserie stuff

The meat is moist, but the skin does not get crisp at all in the crock pot.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Karerose (Post 16460209)
Why are you suppose to wash and dry a chicken? I know I've seen that on cooking shows, and my father probably told me to do that too, but I don't know why? You never wash and dry other meat, so why chicken? And do you wash and dry chicken pieces? I'll admit I never do that. Should I be?

USDA says not to rinse due to risk of cross-contamination.
I DO rinse. In a bowl in my deep sink. And then I thoroughly wipe and disinfect the area. Might not do any good, but the health code guy will bust a restaurant for not rinsing chicken, so I do it out of habit.

Beth2013 06-08-2013 09:15 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PassionateFire (Post 16460440)
That's the one! The drippings are to die for!

Great and thanks for bringing it to our attention. I'm going to try it!

metqa 06-09-2013 08:34 AM

how can you cross contaminate one chicke? Whatever was on the bird will still be on the bird. It's not like you are bathing your chicken with your beef roast. I don't understand. Besides that if you cook the dang thing to the safe temperature it should kill everything that is not ebola ( I mean e coli! :D)

What do home farmers do when they pluck their chickens? I'm sure they clean them afterwards. That warning is nonsense. I don't want chicken bloody juice all over my bird as I'm trying to prepare it. I need to rinse and dry the skin of so the surface can get nice and crispy.

Because I cook it at such a high temperature, I don't put any organic seasonings on top as they will char and burn off, I use only salt, but I can put herbs or seasoning under the skin or inside the cavity where the high heat won't incinerate them.

at_last 06-10-2013 05:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by metqa (Post 16462514)
how can you cross contaminate one chicke? Whatever was on the bird will still be on the bird. It's not like you are bathing your chicken with your beef roast. I don't understand. Besides that if you cook the dang thing to the safe temperature it should kill everything that is not ebola ( I mean e coli! :D)

:laugh:

By cross-contamination, I believe they mean contaminating your kitchen surfaces with bacteria. When you hold the chicken under running water, the spray settles on surrounding surfaces, carrying the bacteria with it.

That's why emel rinses their chicken in a bowl of water.

metqa 06-10-2013 10:45 AM

Oh, okay, I can see that, but I'm already cross contaminating everything I touch while I'm holding and processing the bird, water dribbling down to my elbows, I dont get that much spray from water running, I don't use the spray nozzle, but it's such a big production that you get water everywhere anywere, so I guess that advice is for people who don't know to wipe up afterward. :rolleyes:

Does anyone have suggestion for rosemary chicken? Do you put the rosemary on the surface of the skin or beneath?

SCOTTSDALEJULIE 06-13-2013 11:58 AM

This recipe is unbelievable;
Home > Recipes > Recipe
Pan-Roasted Chicken & Gravy
Print Full
Source: EatingWell Magazine

Recipe Save Recipe view my favorites email recipe to a friend
Rating: Reviews: 0
Rate/Review this Recipe
Active Time: 25 Minutes
Total Time: 1 Hour 15 Minutes
Yield: 6 servings
A cast-iron skillet is the perfect vessel for a simple roast chicken. Almost every side dish, be it vegetables, legumes, pasta or rice, goes well with it. Try Braised Fennel with Tomatoes & Potatoes or Tuscan Cabbage & Mushrooms.
RECIPE INGREDIENTS
1 large clove garlic, minced
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
1/4 teaspoon ground white pepper
1 1/2 teaspoons fresh thyme leaves
1 3 1/2-pound chicken, giblets removed
1 teaspoon peanut or canola oil
2 teaspoons butter, softened, divided

2 teaspoons all-purpose flour
1 1/2 cups reduced-sodium chicken broth
1 tablespoon minced fresh flat-leaf parsley for garnish

You May Also Like
Ham-&-Cheese-Stuffed Chicken Breasts See More Similar Recipes
DIRECTIONS
Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.


Mash garlic and salt into a paste in a small bowl, using the back of a spoon. Stir in pepper and thyme.


With a sharp knife, remove any excess fat from chicken. Dry the inside with a paper towel. With your fingers, loosen the skin over the breasts and thighs to make pockets, being careful not to tear the skin. Rub the garlic mixture over the breast and thigh meat.


Heat oil and 1 teaspoon butter in a 12-inch cast-iron skillet over medium heat. Add the chicken and cook, turning often, until nicely browned on all sides, about 10 minutes.


Transfer the pan to the oven and roast the chicken until the internal temperature in the thickest part of the thigh reaches 165 degrees F, 50 minutes to 1 hour. Transfer the chicken to a clean cutting board; tent with foil.


Meanwhile, mash the remaining 1 teaspoon butter and flour in a small bowl until a paste forms. Place the pan (use caution, the handle will be hot) over medium-high heat. Add broth and bring to a simmer, stirring to scrape up any browned bits. Gradually whisk in the butter-flour paste a few bits at a time, until the gravy thickens, about 8 minutes. Remove from the heat and let stand for 5 minutes, allowing any fat to rise to the top. Skim off the fat with a spoon. Carve the chicken and serve with the gravy. Garnish with parsley, if desired.

SCOTTSDALEJULIE 06-13-2013 12:02 PM

This is so good and only 1 gram of carbs per serving

Home > Recipes > Recipe
Pan-Roasted Chicken & Gravy
Print Full
Source: EatingWell Magazine

Recipe Save Recipe view my favorites email recipe to a friend
Rating: Reviews: 0
Rate/Review this Recipe
Active Time: 25 Minutes
Total Time: 1 Hour 15 Minutes
Yield: 6 servings
A cast-iron skillet is the perfect vessel for a simple roast chicken. Almost every side dish, be it vegetables, legumes, pasta or rice, goes well with it. Try Braised Fennel with Tomatoes & Potatoes or Tuscan Cabbage & Mushrooms.
RECIPE INGREDIENTS
1 large clove garlic, minced
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
1/4 teaspoon ground white pepper
1 1/2 teaspoons fresh thyme leaves
1 3 1/2-pound chicken, giblets removed
1 teaspoon peanut or canola oil
2 teaspoons butter, softened, divided

2 teaspoons all-purpose flour
1 1/2 cups reduced-sodium chicken broth
1 tablespoon minced fresh flat-leaf parsley for garnish

You May Also Like
Ham-&-Cheese-Stuffed Chicken Breasts See More Similar Recipes
DIRECTIONS
Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.


Mash garlic and salt into a paste in a small bowl, using the back of a spoon. Stir in pepper and thyme.


With a sharp knife, remove any excess fat from chicken. Dry the inside with a paper towel. With your fingers, loosen the skin over the breasts and thighs to make pockets, being careful not to tear the skin. Rub the garlic mixture over the breast and thigh meat.


Heat oil and 1 teaspoon butter in a 12-inch cast-iron skillet over medium heat. Add the chicken and cook, turning often, until nicely browned on all sides, about 10 minutes.


Transfer the pan to the oven and roast the chicken until the internal temperature in the thickest part of the thigh reaches 165 degrees F, 50 minutes to 1 hour. Transfer the chicken to a clean cutting board; tent with foil.


Meanwhile, mash the remaining 1 teaspoon butter and flour in a small bowl until a paste forms. Place the pan (use caution, the handle will be hot) over medium-high heat. Add broth and bring to a simmer, stirring to scrape up any browned bits. Gradually whisk in the butter-flour paste a few bits at a time, until the gravy thickens, about 8 minutes. Remove from the heat and let stand for 5 minutes, allowing any fat to rise to the top. Skim off the fat with a spoon. Carve the chicken and serve with the gravy. Garnish with parsley, if desired.

SCOTTSDALEJULIE 06-13-2013 12:03 PM

Sorry for the double post. But, really it is that good:)

Strawberry 06-15-2013 08:23 PM

A friend mine has a George Forman rotisserie and it makes the most delicious moist tasty chicken! And with minimal effort. All you do is rub it with oil and salt and pepper and garlic powder and put it in to cook. If you really love rotisserie chicken and eat it frequently, investing in a home rotisserie might be worth it for you.


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