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-   -   easy to peel hard boiled eggs (http://www.lowcarbfriends.com/bbs/low-carb-recipe-help-suggestions/796640-easy-peel-hard-boiled-eggs.html)

muncheechee 02-07-2013 04:49 PM

easy to peel hard boiled eggs
 
Just thought this was too good not to pass on. I learned a great method for boiling eggs that are always easy to peel.

Add eggs to the water AFTER it starts to boil!!! Who knew? (Certainly not me)

Do add a splash of vinegar to the water before carefully lowering eggs into the water with a slotted spoon to prevent any escaping egg white from making a big mess in your pot.

Put a lid on your pot to help the water temp recover faster after adding the eggs. Adding salt to the water can help too (or maybe I'm making this up but I always add salt and this reasoning sounds good;) )

Set the timer for around 10 minutes or so depending on how hard boiled you want them and how many eggs you are cooking at once. I usually do a dozen eggs for 10 minutes and they are just shy of being completely done in the center of the yolk.

Hope this helps someone :)

lterry913 02-07-2013 07:00 PM

I agree ...this method works for me too ...I use baking soda in water instead of vinegar.

sylviepajot7 02-07-2013 07:50 PM

Thank you! I have often wondered if there was a better way as I struggled to peel my eggs.

jenericstewart 02-08-2013 04:02 PM

I just tried this experiment, with eggs that were laid early this morning. Sadly, they didn't peel perfectly, but better than how they typically peel.

CarolynF 02-08-2013 04:42 PM

Yes, fresh eggs are hard to peel...

muncheechee 02-08-2013 06:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jenericstewart (Post 16248542)
I just tried this experiment, with eggs that were laid early this morning. Sadly, they didn't peel perfectly, but better than how they typically peel.

Bet eggs that fresh are yummy! I've always heard older eggs are easier to peel... something to do with the membrane breaking down over time.

DiggingDogFarm 02-08-2013 08:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by muncheechee (Post 16248739)
Bet eggs that fresh are yummy! I've always heard older eggs are easier to peel... something to do with the membrane breaking down over time.

The pH increases in older eggs making them easier to peel.
That's why adding some baking soda to the cooking water also helps improve ease of peeling.

From On Food and Cooking: The Science and Lore of the Kitchen By Harold McGee, Page 88:

"Difficult peeling is characteristic of fresh eggs with a relatively low albumen pH, which somehow causes the albumin to adhere to the inner shell membrane more strongly than it coheres to itself. At the pH typical after several days of refrigeration, around 9.2, the shell peels easily. If you end up with a carton of very fresh eggs and need to cook them right away, you can add a half teaspoon of baking soda to a quart of water to make the cooking water alkaline."

~Martin

The Chicken Lady 02-09-2013 11:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jenericstewart (Post 16248542)
I just tried this experiment, with eggs that were laid early this morning. Sadly, they didn't peel perfectly, but better than how they typically peel.

When I gather my eggs I let them sit out on the counter at least one day before sticking them in the frig. They peel like a dream after that....but yeah I don't care what you do an egg that fresh is just not going to peel.

CherylB 02-09-2013 11:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DiggingDogFarm (Post 16248923)
The pH increases in older eggs making them easier to peel.
That's why adding some baking soda to the cooking water also helps improve ease of peeling.

From On Food and Cooking: The Science and Lore of the Kitchen By Harold McGee, Page 88:

"Difficult peeling is characteristic of fresh eggs with a relatively low albumen pH, which somehow causes the albumin to adhere to the inner shell membrane more strongly than it coheres to itself. At the pH typical after several days of refrigeration, around 9.2, the shell peels easily. If you end up with a carton of very fresh eggs and need to cook them right away, you can add a half teaspoon of baking soda to a quart of water to make the cooking water alkaline."

~Martin

I agree with everything in this quote except that putting eggs in the refrigerator for a few days is enough to allow the pH to be good enough for pealing. I have hated making HB eggs for this reason. I heard that using salt was as good as using baking soda so I used salt. It was hit or miss. But with baking soda, problem solved.

How I cook mine is I place them in hot tap water, add baking soda and turn the stove on high. Cover them with the lid and stand by, waiting for them to just begin to boil. Turn stove off and remove from heat (after they started to boil but not so long that they crack and make a mess) and set the buzzer for about 16 minutes.

Just a quick minute in cold water afterward, then peal. I like my eggs warm. :)

lterry913 02-09-2013 12:36 PM

I tried as you mention above but the only way mine peeled effortlessly was when I let the water boil first...don't know why, but I am glad others have found a way because it was sooo frustrating.


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