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-   -   Can I use vegetable powders in baking? (http://www.lowcarbfriends.com/bbs/low-carb-recipe-help-suggestions/795809-can-i-use-vegetable-powders-baking.html)

Seeking 01-30-2013 03:34 PM

Can I use vegetable powders in baking?
 
I know that people use vegetable powder in smoothies and food bars but what about using a veggie powder as a flour? Does this work?

ravenrose 01-31-2013 09:22 AM

such as? what is vegetable powder? most flour ingredients are made with plant materials so are in some sense "vegetable," but that doesn't seem to be what you mean.

there are a lot of good low carb flour ingredients you can find out about reading the threads here. if you DID have a powdered vegetable, I suspect it would not work at all well and have a lot more carbs too. I suggest eating your vegetables normally.

kalatraza 01-31-2013 09:42 AM

Interesting question. I have a sample size of carrot powder and pumpkin powder (both from spice sage) living in my cabinet and haven't a clue what to do with either. . . .

Charski 01-31-2013 10:22 AM

It may work - a lot of things that need a little thickening call for pureeing some of the cooked veggies and adding back to the soup, stew, potroast, etc.

Would be an interesting experiment for sure! Let us know if you try it!

I dehydrate a lot of summer veggies like zucchini and yellow squash and kale. I bet I could powder those down in my Vitamix and use them as a thickener for soup...hmmmmm.......... :)

rosethorns 01-31-2013 11:26 AM

I use powdered tomato that I dried, also dry cauliflower for soups. I haven't thought of others.

Seeking 01-31-2013 02:24 PM

So nobody knows yet whether vegetable powders may be used in baking?

Strawberry 01-31-2013 08:47 PM

I have a feeling that vegetable powders would be very strong tasting and wouldnt make very good bread and esp would be too strong to make sweet treats.

The main uses I have seen for dehydrated vegetables or powders have been in small quantities to flavor savory things - such as soups or salad dressings.

Also, dehydrated veggies have a lot of carbs - when you take out all the water, and shrink them down and then grind them up. So it may not really have much benefit over using other flour substitutes. For eg, 1 oz of dehydrated green beans has 20g carbs... thats about the same for 1 oz of flour. Now granted, there is more vitamins in there.

Why dont you try using the vegetable powders and let us know what works for you?

Seeking 02-01-2013 07:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Strawberry (Post 16232651)
I have a feeling that vegetable powders would be very strong tasting and wouldnt make very good bread and esp would be too strong to make sweet treats.

The main uses I have seen for dehydrated vegetables or powders have been in small quantities to flavor savory things - such as soups or salad dressings.

Also, dehydrated veggies have a lot of carbs - when you take out all the water, and shrink them down and then grind them up. So it may not really have much benefit over using other flour substitutes. For eg, 1 oz of dehydrated green beans has 20g carbs... thats about the same for 1 oz of flour. Now granted, there is more vitamins in there.

Why dont you try using the vegetable powders and let us know what works for you?

Ah ok. You make some very good points. I hadn't thought about the high carbs for vegetable powders. Thanks for your input; I suppose that kills it. Almond flour would still be the best for low-carb baking.


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