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-   -   is there such a thing as low carb roux? (http://www.lowcarbfriends.com/bbs/low-carb-recipe-help-suggestions/795770-there-such-thing-low-carb-roux.html)

flatferenghi 01-30-2013 04:44 AM

is there such a thing as low carb roux?
 
i have watched every tv chef make it. i can do it too. There MUST be a lc carb alternative...anyone? And remember: you will RUE the day if you RUIN the ROUX. Love & Profits: FLATFERENGHI

slbbw 01-30-2013 05:11 AM

Well, I will weigh in here. For some reason, outside Louisiana anyway, most people appear to think the dark, smokey roux that we create for gumbo is for "thickening". Actually, if creoles want thick gumbo, they add okra, or file (sassafras root). The roux is for flavor.. period. The flour in the this kind of roux (with an equal amount of oil) actually loses it's thickening attributes as it is slowly, carefully browned to a dark chocolate color. The darker the roux (without burning!) the richer and more flavorful is the gumbo. Butter and flour, cooked together without browning, is the type of roux used in many applications for thickening.

I posted about this a couple of years ago when I was desperate to find a flour substitute for roux. Nothing I found works. This is what I decided. Since the roux is a flavoring agent, I use flour, but as small amount as possible to still maintain flavor. Generally speaking, my gumbo serves 8-10 using 1/2 cup of flour for about 50 carbs for the total recipe plus any added by aromatics/sausage, etc. I don't eat the rice. I can work that many carbs into my diet occasionally w/o probs.

Anyway, long answer, but imo, no there is no such thing as lc cajun/creole roux. :)

flatferenghi 01-30-2013 05:27 AM

thanks, slbbw!
 
that was a perfect answer. when i start making recipes requiring roux, i will keep the flour quantity to a minimum. FF

buttoni 01-30-2013 06:50 AM

When I was still eating wheat, I could brown Carbalose or sift the shortening out of Carbquick and get a pretty good roux nutty flavor. But they have wheat, so those aren't an option for me anymore. I haven't tried a roux since going Primal/Paleo and ditching wheat. Have thought about powdering quinoa as fine as possible and seeing if one can brown that and trying it for a roux.

ravenrose 01-30-2013 08:13 AM

99% of the time when people say "roux" they are referring to thickening sauces with a mixture of fat and flour. that browned Louisiana roux is a different thing and used in only a few specialized recipes.

for thickening, you will want glucomannan, or perhaps guar or xanthan gum. they all tend to lump badly, so either mix them with oil before adding to the cooking mixture (about 50/50) or sprinkle on a LITTLE at a time and stir stir stir. You use very little compared to flour, so don't overdo.

slbbw 01-30-2013 08:39 AM

Peggy, I also tried carbalose and carbquick. I thought the taste was pretty much horrendous. Different strokes? As for thickening, for those who prefer that, use okra. Or file. Again, different strokes. Some people put ::gasp:: tomatoes or tomato sauce in it. :hyst: I wouldn't eat it, but hey :)

DixieMoon 01-30-2013 12:03 PM

Can you make a roux using coconut flour????

Charski 01-30-2013 01:27 PM

I've made roux using quinoa flour - not the super-dark roux of which Sharon is speaking, but the one for thickening (blonde in color) - I bet you could use the quinoa and continue cooking to that dark color though.

KCSoccer 01-30-2013 02:21 PM

When I created my Chicken and Andouille Sausage Gumbo, I made a roux out of 1/4 cup light olive oil and 1/4 carbalose flour (or you could use regular flour). I made this in the microwave - much easier to do, and not as much chance of scorching the roux. I found that this amount gave the gumbo the "proper" nutty roux taste, but it didn't add to much in the way of carbs per serving. As slbbw says, since it is an occasional thing, I don't worry about the little extra bit from the flour or carbalose flour.

Here are the directions for the microwaved roux:
In a 2-cup Pyrex cup, cook olive oil and Carbalose flour for 3 minutes, stirring once or twice. Continue cooking, checking every 30 seconds, until mixture is the color of peanut butter. Be careful as it's very HOT - there's a reason this stuff is called "Cajun Napalm".

buttoni 01-30-2013 06:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Charski (Post 16229622)
I've made roux using quinoa flour - not the super-dark roux of which Sharon is speaking, but the one for thickening (blonde in color) - I bet you could use the quinoa and continue cooking to that dark color though.

Oh, good, Char. I'll try that next etouffee I make. Appreciate your experience feedback.

buttoni 01-30-2013 06:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by slbbw (Post 16229006)
Peggy, I also tried carbalose and carbquick. I thought the taste was pretty much horrendous. Different strokes? :)

My Cajun spices and veggies always drowned out any C or CQ aftertaste. :)

Ginaaaaaa 01-30-2013 07:30 PM

When I want a low carb roux I usually use a combo of glucommanan and corn starch, that way its such a small amount of corn starch per serving so it barely adds many carbs to the recipe. 1 tbsp of cornstarch has 7.4 gm of carbs, split that between 5 or 6 servings and it only adds about 1 1/2 gm of carbs per serving.

I just made beef and broccoli and I used 1 tbsp of cornstarch and 1/2 tsp of glucommanan to thicken about 2 cups liquid and it worked really well.

Strawberry 01-30-2013 08:10 PM

Flatferengi, if you want to do cajun style recipes, try just following the recipe minus the flour. I have made gumbo and jumbalaya (using cauliflower instead of rice) and the flavor of andouille sausage and the other seasonings are so strong that I didnt miss the roux at all. Now, I'm not a Lousianna native or a fine chef, so maybe there is some difference, but I couldn't tell and really enjoyed the recipes.

flatferenghi 01-31-2013 10:58 AM

Thanks for all the advice, HEWMONS
 
I will be spending lots of time in the kitchen after 2/15/13. FF

drjlocarb 01-31-2013 01:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by flatferenghi (Post 16231632)
I will be spending lots of time in the kitchen after 2/15/13. FF

:jumpjoy::clap:


Don't forget about us when you are NOT working!

Charski 01-31-2013 01:24 PM

Boy I bet you are counting every second between now and then! :D

What else are you planning for all your free time??

flatferenghi 02-01-2013 07:43 AM

I PLAN to spend as little latinum as possible.
 
buying a whole chicken or chicken thighs instead of chicken chests. Cheaper cuts of everything as a matter of fact. when making tuna salad, using half solid white and 1/2 chunk light instead of all solid white. That sort of thing. Getting back into walking, on a regular basis. Most important-to stay as busy as possible to stay as far away from the fridge as possible.Not to be RUDE even i should RUIN the ROUX FF

yougottaeat 02-02-2013 01:33 PM

I use almond flour with half butter half oil for the fat when making roux for gumbo. It has a slightly different texture as well as flavor, but my family likes it just fine in gumbo. It has a slight nutty flavor like browned butter. Even the carb eaters eat it without comment that it is different.

piratejenny 02-24-2013 02:26 PM

I re-discovered chickpea flour today, for making gravy.
(I used to use it a long time ago, but sort of forgot about it.)
It has thickening superpowers, and doesn't get lumpy. It has a nice flavor, and is cheap compared to many other LC flour substitutes ($3/lb vs $9/lb for almond flour at my local store).

I toasted it in a dry pan and then added ingredients to make gravy.

PS--13g net carbs per 1/4 cup (compared to 23 g carbs in wheat flour),
and a little goes a long way! It's tastier than flour, too, but not particularly "beany".

buttoni 02-26-2013 11:34 AM

The next Cajun recipe I make I'm going to try using my new lupin flour for making a roux and see how that comes out.

Ginaaaaaa 02-26-2013 11:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by buttoni (Post 16282081)
The next Cajun recipe I make I'm going to try using my new lupin flour for making a roux and see how that comes out.

I've used the BTF mix to make a roux, and it worked just like regular flour.

Barbo 02-26-2013 05:49 PM

Thanks Sharon
 
For providing the difference between making a roux as the
flavor of the gumbo vs. the thickening. Okra can be purchased
in our area frozen in winter. I love gumbo and I do use regular
flour for the roux. I am going to try oat flour next and see what
happens.

Wendi-Bell 01-30-2014 12:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by yougottaeat (Post 16235801)
I use almond flour with half butter half oil for the fat when making roux for gumbo. It has a slightly different texture as well as flavor, but my family likes it just fine in gumbo. It has a slight nutty flavor like browned butter. Even the carb eaters eat it without comment that it is different.

Exactly what I was looking for. Thanks!!

NAT&RD 02-02-2014 08:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by piratejenny (Post 16278190)
I re-discovered chickpea flour today, for making gravy.
(I used to use it a long time ago, but sort of forgot about it.)
It has thickening superpowers, and doesn't get lumpy. It has a nice flavor, and is cheap compared to many other LC flour substitutes ($3/lb vs $9/lb for almond flour at my local store).

I toasted it in a dry pan and then added ingredients to make gravy.

PS--13g net carbs per 1/4 cup (compared to 23 g carbs in wheat flour),
and a little goes a long way! It's tastier than flour, too, but not particularly "beany".

Do you mix with a little water and add to recipe, or cook with fat then add liquid ?

shipoo 02-02-2014 01:36 PM

I used part of a recipe of maria's using 1 tbsp. Butter 4 oz cream cheese and I cup chicken bouillion. Cook over low until melted. Depending how thick and how much you need you can add grated cheese and more almond milk to get it to your required thickness and volume.

piratejenny 02-07-2014 06:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by COOLCRUISER (Post 16783354)
Do you mix with a little water and add to recipe, or cook with fat then add liquid ?

I lightly brown the flour in a heavy pan, then add fat & mix it into a paste, then add liquid.

If you add liquid to the hot pan with only flour, it steams up a lot and scatters "dust" all over your stove!

watcher513 02-09-2014 02:01 AM

Arrowroot is 6.8 net carbs per Tablespoon. A little less than cornstarch.

Ginaaaaaa 02-09-2014 08:43 AM

I use arrowroot but keep in mind it doesn't keep it's thickening power if you need to reheat the food. It seems to work really well and you don't need much at all. I especially like it for thickening cold stuff like puddings and fruit glazes for pies. It makes then nice and glossy.

pooticus 02-09-2014 11:18 PM

I've used coconut flour and oat fiber combined with fat 1;1 to form a dark brown roux for brown gravy. It doesn't have as much thickening power but did give good flavor. I then thickened with gluc powder.


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