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-   -   Almond Flour v Coconut Flour - Which Is Lower Carb/More Useful (http://www.lowcarbfriends.com/bbs/low-carb-recipe-help-suggestions/795591-almond-flour-v-coconut-flour-lower-carb-more-useful.html)

Amber_Baby 01-28-2013 04:39 AM

Almond Flour v Coconut Flour - Which Is Lower Carb/More Useful
 
Hiya

I'm going to buy either some almond flour or some coconut flour. The first thing I'd like to try is combining the flour with parmesan to make 'breading' for chicken or fish and I know there are lots of other uses too.

Can anyone tell me which they would recommend? Which is lower carb?

Thanks

leaving30something 01-28-2013 04:54 AM

I bought both. I think they are both very low, coconut possibly somewhat lower but I don't have it in front of me. I've been using the almond and parm and love it! Have used for chicken, fish, eggplant and zucchini!

emel 01-28-2013 04:59 AM

The characteristics are different.
Almond flour would work better in a breading.
Coconut flour really sucks up moisture, so it makes it a useful ingredient for making LC pancakes, muffins, and breads.

You cannot do a straight substitution between almond flour and coconut flour.
If a baked good recipe calls for 2 T of almond flour, subbing 2 T coconut flour will make it dry. Conversely, subbing almond flour in a recipe that calls for coconut flour will result in a runnier batter.

I'd say I use coconut flour more often. I use it it floopsies. I use it in a flax pancake as a sub for some of the flax. I use it in pizza crust (but I need to tweak my recipe).

I keep both of mine in the freezer, in a zip lock.

emel 01-28-2013 05:18 AM

My breader recipe:

Bowl 1:
2T almond flour mixed w/ Tbl of parmesan, can season w/garlic powder if you want.

Bowl 2:
an egg beaten with a little water

Bowl 3:
2 T almond flour
5 or 6 good sized pork rinds, pulverized to a fine powder
1/4 cup parmesan.

Dust the product by dipping into bowl 1.
Dip the product into the eggwash (bowl 2)
Coat by rolling around in bowl 3.

Calories 466.8
Total Fat 34.0 g
Total Carbohydrate 6.1 g
Dietary Fiber 3.0 g
Protein 32.7 g

A hint:
mix up your stuff but don't use all of it in the bowl at once. It gets gooey from the eggwash and you end up with a sticky mess that you have to throw away.

It's hard to calculate your carbs/cal from this.
Last time I did it, I made an enormous platter of fried veggies and chicken bites. My husband and I shared it and I threw a few pieces away because we were stuffed. Plus some of the breading got tossed as it got gloppy from the egg wash.

Amber_Baby 01-28-2013 05:51 AM

Perfect, I've gone ahead and ordered one of each so thank you for the info.

Emel, thanks so much for the recipe. Are the pork rinds essential or can it be done without them?

emel 01-28-2013 05:57 AM

YOu can do without them. I just like to tweak.
There's lots of recipes online that call for just almond flour and parmesan.

cfine 01-28-2013 07:41 AM

I use my almond flour a lot more than my coconut flour. The only things I use the coconut flour for are pancakes and as a thickener.

ravenrose 01-28-2013 10:57 AM

I just can't use coconut flour. it tastes like COCONUT in everything. LOL really, I don't know why people use it, except in very specialized recipes.

Janknitz 01-28-2013 12:03 PM

I find coconut flour very hard to work with and things rarely have the right texture with it. It occasionally comes in handy, but I've been working with the same 12 oz can I bought more than a year ago. You've already ordered it, but I would suggest for others contemplating this that you can find coconut flour in the bulk bins of health stores like WF--buy a little and see if you like it before committing to a larger quantity.

Almond flour, on the other hand, is used all the time and, while it's not the same as wheat flour, it works pretty well in most things I make (I use it in one minute muffins instead of flax). You can buy it fairly inexpensively at health stores and Trader Joe's and it's not that difficult to make at home in a food processor or blender if you are careful to grind small quantites at LOW SPEED in quick bursts so that you don't end up with almond butter instead.

picklepete 01-28-2013 07:55 PM

I really like blending them. I keep a refrigerated plastic bin of coconut + almond + golden flax and it works for most purposes.

Avy 01-28-2013 08:55 PM

Coconut flour is much much cheaper here, so I use that one most of the time. I however, really don't like the flavour or texture, so there's only a couple recipes that I really like with it. Combining it with oat fiber really works wonders.

Almond flour seems to have the closest "bread texture" and best flavour of the substitutes I use, but I use it sparingly because it's so pricey here, and I only buy it when it's randomly on sale at a local store, and only when they have it in the bulk section. And then, it's still more expensive than I see others on here paying! lol.

elainesmith 01-29-2013 07:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by picklepete (Post 16225820)
I really like blending them. I keep a refrigerated plastic bin of coconut + almond + golden flax and it works for most purposes.

what percentages of each?

rosethorns 01-29-2013 07:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Amber_Baby (Post 16223873)
Hiya

I'm going to buy either some almond flour or some coconut flour. The first thing I'd like to try is combining the flour with parmesan to make 'breading' for chicken or fish and I know there are lots of other uses too.

Can anyone tell me which they would recommend? Which is lower carb?

Thanks

For chicken and fish I like crushed pork rinds for breading.:)

picklepete 01-29-2013 07:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by elainesmith (Post 16228074)
what percentages of each?

I experiment. I think the current bin is 2 flax, 1 coconut, 1 almond. Works pretty well for mug cakes.

lindaokc 01-30-2013 04:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Avy (Post 16225893)
Coconut flour is much much cheaper here, so I use that one most of the time. I however, really don't like the flavour or texture, so there's only a couple recipes that I really like with it. Combining it with oat fiber really works wonders.

Almond flour seems to have the closest "bread texture" and best flavour of the substitutes I use, but I use it sparingly because it's so pricey here, and I only buy it when it's randomly on sale at a local store, and only when they have it in the bulk section. And then, it's still more expensive than I see others on here paying! lol.

Avy, how do you combine your coconut flour and oat fiber? One to one? Asking because I have a lifetime supply of coconut flour. :laugh:

LindaSue 01-30-2013 06:18 AM

Here are some count comparisons for you:

2 ounces Aloha Nu brand coconut flour:
251 Calories; 9g Fat; 10g Protein; 34g Carbohydrate; 21g Dietary Fiber; 13g Net Carbs

2 ounces almond flour:
329 Calories; 29g Fat; 12g Protein; 11g Carbohydrate; 7g Dietary Fiber; 4g Net Carbs

buttoni 01-30-2013 06:43 AM

I use them both, but in a recipe, I use predominantly almond and just add a tiny bit of coconut flour for the texture synergy it brings to baked goods. Like everyone has already said, it's tricky to use and can overpower a recipe (flavor-wise) real fast. And as a moisture sponge, it can make some bake d goods come out like a dry, hard-to-swallow inedible "brick" if you use too much of it.

Soobee 01-30-2013 07:57 AM

Although coconut flour seems to be way higher in carbs, you use significantly less of it in any given recipe. I think the carbs work out to be higher than almond flour, but not by much.

Charski 01-30-2013 01:44 PM

If I had to make a choice between my Honeyville blanched almond flour and my coconut flour - you could have the coconut flour. I've never cared for much of what I've made with it (exception - the strawberry shortcake recipe on this board someplace) but I LOVE my blanched almond flour.

The Chicken Lady 01-30-2013 06:55 PM

In my opinion, for whatever that's worth, I think the almond flour is far superior for baking, but the coconut flour is better as a filler/binder for things like meatloaves and salmon patties.

This is two cans of salmon.

Salmon Patties

1 can drained Wild Alaskan Sockeye Red Salmon (my favorite)
4 eggs, beaten
1/4 cup coconut flour
1/2 teaspoon Garlic Seasoned Salt
Pinch of Old Bay

Mix the eggs and the coconut flour together until you have the consistency of fluffy mashed potatoes. Mix egg mixture with the rest of the ingredients. Form patties, coat with popcorn meal or some other whole grain cornmeal and fry.

Makes 4 large patties.

http://i708.photobucket.com/albums/w...Patties001.jpg

http://i708.photobucket.com/albums/w...Patties002.jpg

http://i708.photobucket.com/albums/w...Patties003.jpg

Ginaaaaaa 01-30-2013 07:15 PM

Wow those salmon partties look amazing!!! I know what's going on my shopping list!

I use both flours so I always have them on hand. I think I use the almond flour for more savory recipes and the coconut flour for sweets, but I do use them both for savory and sweet too.

I use the almond flour for breading, and cakes, cookies and cereal. I use coconut flour for dipping meats in before breading with almond flour to make it stick better. I also use the coconut flour for ouizoids fantastic flour mix. I have lots of recipes that use both flours so I couldn't be without either one. I guess it just depends on your tastes and what you like or want to make.

rosethorns 01-30-2013 07:36 PM

Chicken Lady I have 3 cans of wild Alaskan sockeye red salmon just waiting for this recipe. OH I can't wait. Scrumdelicious!!!!!

I use both flours . I couldn't be without them.

Nikki2777 01-31-2013 04:39 AM

Chicken Lady.... Thank you for the Salmon patties recipe.

picklepete.... I, too, prepackage all the dry ingredients for my OMM in small size snack bags.

Nikki

The Chicken Lady 01-31-2013 03:56 PM

Hey, your welcome guys, Salmon Patties is a favorite around here too.

Jesstar 09-24-2013 12:29 PM

I agree that coconut flour has peculiar sweet coconut taste, so if you don't like coconuts and coconut milk as me, you might not like it. But it's very healthy, that's why I add it sometimes when I cook something sweet, not pizza or something)

oliveoyl 10-04-2013 06:59 AM

I guess it's a little bit late to reply but I just had to add that I've pretty much stopped using coconut flour, first because it sits in my tummy like lead even if I eat just a little bit and second because it makes a mess of my dishwasher. It makes a paste that sticks to the mesh drain and is real hard to get rid of.

mjgh06 10-07-2013 07:24 AM

I was just researching this last night and found a site that stated Almond flour is not good for us if eaten often because you are way overeating almonds which are high in Omega 6 and oxalates. I can't post the link because the site also has a store, but you can google Reasons to Avoid Almond Flour.

I am still undecided. Right now I am not eating any bread-type products, but I wanted to prepare for a low carb alternative when I do end up baking. I read about coconut flour as well and have read mixed reviews on it. Although it has some very beneficial qualities, it is also high in saturated fats (one website said Omega 6 as well, but I thought only unsaturated fats could be Omega 6). so I don't know. Wish there was an Olive flour. I guess there is good and bad to everything and we all just have to make the decision that seems best to us at the time.

SkeeterN 10-07-2013 07:59 AM

Coconut Flour seriously has a learning curve and doesn't work like any thing you have ever used before. It takes eggs to make this work. I have learned it also doesn't take much coconut flour either in comparison to other flours.

I have found for the most part add the coconut flour last after you have added every ingredient in the recipe first works best, stopping just as the batter seems to be getting thickish. Sometimes if you are following a recipe you might think..... the recipe calls for 3/4 cup, therefore I need to add 3/4 cup. Not always the case. Sometimes if you force it the end product may very well be very, very dry.

Before I ever baked with coconut flour I watched Youtube video's and read how to use it.

The pie crust recipe I posted does work pretty good using the amounts I shared but things like cakes and such really does need to be less is more if you know what I mean.

I made a chocolate cake that took a dozen eggs and butter and it still was dry. What saved it was I made a sugar free caramel frosting recipe (someone gave me) and let it sit in the refrigerator frosted and covered and the moistness from the frosting seem to help the cake stop being so dry and was actually very good.


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