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-   -   Help to retrofit a recipe - peach pudding/cake with cream (http://www.lowcarbfriends.com/bbs/low-carb-recipe-help-suggestions/785263-help-retrofit-recipe-peach-pudding-cake-cream.html)

sbarr 10-10-2012 05:21 PM

Help to retrofit a recipe - peach pudding/cake with cream
 
Just had Dottie's coconut flour biscuit and to doctor it up, I added peach preserve, butter and cream over the top and reheated. It brought back a memory of the absolute best dessert I had in Austin in the 10 years I lived there. I haven't had it in 12 years, but now I remember it as if yesterday. This could truly be a decadent treat for company or during the holidays. I would probably halve the recipe for personal use, unless entertaining if the carb count from the peaches is too high.

Here is the original - can someone with LC baking expertise please help advise how to retrofit to be LC? Note - this is not a proprietary recipe, it is freely given out by the restaurant - I checked several links and most of them were identical.

I'm hoping for something relatively detailed with proportions that would substitute the flour and sweetener. Really, everything else is LC except the peaches, which could perhaps be substituted for another fruit if someone wanted, so there is some flexibility here.

If someone will suggest some ingredient changes, I will be the guinea pig and will report back with pictures, research carb counts (assuming using frozen peaches with no sugar added). I am a rank amateur with LC cooking and I am sure that someone will know what mix of flour-type ingredients would best represent such a recipe. I'm willing to try a few times, if necessary, to get it right with some coaching.

To describe the real thing, it is very moist, a bit spongey, but heavy with the fruit sunk to the bottom. Once you pour the heavy cream over, it's heavenly. Some relevant points about the cooking - 85 minutes to cook the cake, of which the first 40 are covered in foil. I think this attributes to the moistness. The peaches are added to the top of the batter and sink down during the cooking process, so that it's a bit like a pineapple upside down cake with the fruit at the bottom.

If you know anyone from Austin, you could ask them if they have had Wom Kim's Peach Pudding from Hyde Park Bar and Grill. My guess is that 90% of foodies will have had it or heard of it. It was legendary back in the 90's and from recent posts appears to still be a favorite. If you do a google search on the name, there are many references.


Wom Kim's Peach Pudding Recipe at Epicurious

Nonstick vegetable oil spray
1 3/4 cups plus 2 T all purpose flour
2 1/4 teaspoon baking powder
3/4 teaspoon coarse kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
3/4 cups (1 1/2 sticks) unsalted butter, room temperature
1 3/4 cups sugar
2 tablespoons vanilla extract
2 large eggs
3/4 cups buttermilk
4 c peeled sliced peaches (from about 3 pounds)
Whipping cream (sweetened as you prefer)

Preheat over to 350F. Spray 13x9x2-inch glass baking dish with vegetable oil spray. Whisk flour, baking powder, salt, and baking soda in medium bowl. Using electric mixer, beat butter in large bowl until smooth. Gradually beat in sugar. Beat in vanilla, then eggs, 1 at a time, incorporating well after each addition. Using low speed, beat in flour mixture alternately with buttermilk in 3 additions each, beating well between additions.

Transfer batter to baking dish, spreading evenly. Arrange peach slices over batter, overlapping slightly as needed. Spray sheet of foil with vegetable oil spray; cover cake with foil, spray side down, and seal at edges.

Bake 45 minutes. Remove foil (some cake may stick). Bake until top is golden brown, edges are crusty, and tester inserted into center comes out clean, about 40 minutes longer. Cool 1 hour. Serve warm with cream.

Thank you to anyone who will help me make this masterpiece. BTW, the picture is far too skimpy with the cream - I used to DRENCH it.

Here's a picture of it - to get a sense of what it looks like - linked from bigoven.com - credit to IvySue

http://mda.bigoven.com/pics/rs/256/w...ch-pudding.jpg

Librarygirl 10-10-2012 05:30 PM

Wow it looks so delish!!! I'm getting ready to write the LC recipe when it comes. Got pen in hand. :D

sbarr 10-10-2012 05:35 PM

It's heavenly, that picture barely does it justice, but I wanted to add the picture and the description and details so that one of the experts could give advice.

Like a spongy and soggy buttermilk pound cake with peaches and lots of heavy cream. It might be overwhelming and too rich for day to day, but I remember I'd sort of moan and whimper at the restaurant while eating it. This was also before LC for me, over 12 years ago and there was also the sense of guilt since it's not low calorie or low fat, but now that I'm freed from the fear of fat, if it's low carb, I'd probably make this a few times a year as a super special dessert.

Soobee 10-11-2012 05:00 AM

I have a buttermilk cake recipe from Jen in my files. Would this work as the cake?
Almond Vanilla Layer Cake Jen
21/4 cups Bake Mix
1 tbs. baking powder
1/2 tsp. baking soda
1/4 tsp. salt
1/4 cup butter, melted
Liquid Sucralose to equal 3/4 cup
1/2 cup granulated erythritol
1 cup buttermilk
1 tbs. vanilla extract
4 eggs, separated
1/2 tsp. cream of tartar
Preheat oven to 350F. Grease the bottoms only of 2, 8-inch nonstick cake pans really well and dust with a small sprinkling of bake mix. Set aside. In large bowl, combine Bake Mix, baking powder, baking soda and salt. In food processor, process butter and egg yolks. Add Liquid Sucralose and erythritol. Add buttermilk and vanilla extract; process well. Beat egg whites until frothy. Add cream of tartar and continue whipping until egg whites are stiff. Add dry ingredients to buttermilk mixture, processing well until thickened, scraping sides occasionally. Fold in the egg whites. Pour into cake pans, smoothing tops gently and evenly. Bake 25 to 30 minutes, or until turning brown on top, and a cake tester inserted in the center comes out clean. Loosen sides with knife and using spatula loosen underneath cake, support with hand; invert on cake rack.

To make homemade buttermilk, add 1 tbs. lemon juice in measuring cup and then fill with low carbmilk; set aside 5 minutes.

sbarr 10-11-2012 08:20 AM

Thank you, thank you - This looks really close - trying to line up the different ingredients

1 3/4 cups plus 2 T all purpose flour / 2 1/4 cups Bake Mix
2 1/4 teaspoon baking powder / 1 tbs. baking powder
*LC Only* 1/2 tsp. baking soda
*LC Only* 1/2 tsp. cream of tartar
3/4 teaspoon coarse kosher salt / 1/4 tsp. salt
3/4 cups (1 1/2 sticks) unsalted butter / 1/4 cup butter, melted
1 3/4 cups sugar / Liquid Sucralose to equal 3/4 cup + 1/2 cup erythritol
2 tablespoons vanilla extract / 1 tbs. vanilla extract
2 large eggs / 4 eggs, separated
3/4 cups buttermilk / 1 cup buttermilk
4 c peeled sliced peaches
Whipping cream

These are very close - the only ingredient differences are baking soda, cream of tarter and the fruit. The main process difference seems to be beating the egg whites and the 2 stage (much longer cooking process).

Some of the quantity differences make sense:

Less baking powder, less rise/airy texture
More salt since butter is unsalted (is there a standard rule of thumb to say X amount of salt with unsalted butter vs. salted butter)

A few questions - worded generically in case a poster hasn't created Jen's cake, but might be familiar with ingredients and baking:

What are the ingredients in Jen's bake mix?
Can Jen's bake mix be substituted for flour 1:1? Do they have identical liquid needs?
Is there something about Jen's bake mix that would make cooking longer a problem, i.e., would it dry out? - this recipe is cooked for 85 minutes (the first 40 covered with foil)
Is there anything about sucralose and erythrytol that bakers adapt a little bit lower (or is this just a legitimate recipe difference, one cake is sweeter)
What is the purpose of the cream of tartar in this type of recipe? :o
What is the purpose of the baking soda in this type of recipe? :o:o

So really, it looks like the main difference is Flour/Jen's mix and cream of tartar and soda and 2 pans vs. 1 pan, beating egg whites and cooking time (I'll go with the assumption that the fruit and butter difference is a moot point since this is a different recipe). Sorry so many questions, but now that I've remembered that recipe, I want to be careful so the LC recipe is as close as possible to the original first try or maybe just one or two additional tweaks.

Sorry for the lame questions, but this is promisingly close. And, when this is all done, I most definitely want to try Jen's Layer Cake for its own merit. Sounds great.

Soobee 10-11-2012 09:03 AM

Jennifer Eloff is a regular poster here and a terrific cookbook author. She has many different types of bake mixes. I don't remember which one this recipe used. You can google her name to go to her blog, Splendid Low Carbing, or you can PM her for answers if she doesn't see this thread.

sbarr 10-11-2012 09:15 AM

Ohhhhhh, I hadn't realized this was the same Jen/Jennifer Eloff. Excellent!

I look forward to some comments from her, especially if she's the creator of the recipe (and such a guru) that she will be able to easily explain the differences also leveraging her experience. My guess is that as the author, she would have cooked it several times and could offer insight.

I'm sure there are other gurus who can also weigh in on some of these items so I look forward to input before I start my first batch.

Promise to the forum - I will post a final recipe, observations and pictures. It really is a heavenly delicious and decadent dessert that I remember from 12+ years ago and it had just slipped my mind until I tried Dottie's biscuits and realized that my tweaks were in the spirit of that old recipe so I thought to take it to the next level by posting for a retrofit.

Edited to add the recipe for Jen's Bake Mix to save someone else from typing and to keep it all together.


Jennifer's Bake Mix

1 2/3 cups ground almonds
2/3 cup vanilla whey protein
(sweetened with sucralose, i.e. Splenda) comment - looks like I would have to adjust the sugar on the first recipe to accommodate this. I wonder how much? :confused:
2/3 cup vital wheat gluten

pinemeadows 10-11-2012 10:21 AM

bake mix
 
This bake mix you posted with the VWG is probably one of Jen's earlier mixes.

One of her latest bake mixes is made with oat flour I believe, and no gluten. I wonder if the two are interchangeable?

sbarr 10-11-2012 12:07 PM

Ah good point, I had just done a search based on a few key words - I hope she can stop by here and advise on a couple of tweaks. I'm so ready to make this cake

ladeeda 10-30-2012 04:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sbarr (Post 16006143)
Just had Dottie's coconut flour biscuit and to doctor it up, I added peach preserve, butter and cream over the top and reheated. It brought back a memory of the absolute best dessert I had in Austin in the 10 years I lived there. I haven't had it in 12 years, but now I remember it as if yesterday. This could truly be a decadent treat for company or during the holidays. I would probably halve the recipe for personal use, unless entertaining if the carb count from the peaches is too high.

Here is the original - can someone with LC baking expertise please help advise how to retrofit to be LC? Note - this is not a proprietary recipe, it is freely given out by the restaurant - I checked several links and most of them were identical.

I'm hoping for something relatively detailed with proportions that would substitute the flour and sweetener. Really, everything else is LC except the peaches, which could perhaps be substituted for another fruit if someone wanted, so there is some flexibility here.

If someone will suggest some ingredient changes, I will be the guinea pig and will report back with pictures, research carb counts (assuming using frozen peaches with no sugar added). I am a rank amateur with LC cooking and I am sure that someone will know what mix of flour-type ingredients would best represent such a recipe. I'm willing to try a few times, if necessary, to get it right with some coaching.

To describe the real thing, it is very moist, a bit spongey, but heavy with the fruit sunk to the bottom. Once you pour the heavy cream over, it's heavenly. Some relevant points about the cooking - 85 minutes to cook the cake, of which the first 40 are covered in foil. I think this attributes to the moistness. The peaches are added to the top of the batter and sink down during the cooking process, so that it's a bit like a pineapple upside down cake with the fruit at the bottom.

If you know anyone from Austin, you could ask them if they have had Wom Kim's Peach Pudding from Hyde Park Bar and Grill. My guess is that 90% of foodies will have had it or heard of it. It was legendary back in the 90's and from recent posts appears to still be a favorite. If you do a google search on the name, there are many references.


Wom Kim's Peach Pudding Recipe at Epicurious

Nonstick vegetable oil spray
1 3/4 cups plus 2 T all purpose flour
2 1/4 teaspoon baking powder
3/4 teaspoon coarse kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
3/4 cups (1 1/2 sticks) unsalted butter, room temperature
1 3/4 cups sugar
2 tablespoons vanilla extract
2 large eggs
3/4 cups buttermilk
4 c peeled sliced peaches (from about 3 pounds)
Whipping cream (sweetened as you prefer)

Preheat over to 350F. Spray 13x9x2-inch glass baking dish with vegetable oil spray. Whisk flour, baking powder, salt, and baking soda in medium bowl. Using electric mixer, beat butter in large bowl until smooth. Gradually beat in sugar. Beat in vanilla, then eggs, 1 at a time, incorporating well after each addition. Using low speed, beat in flour mixture alternately with buttermilk in 3 additions each, beating well between additions.

Transfer batter to baking dish, spreading evenly. Arrange peach slices over batter, overlapping slightly as needed. Spray sheet of foil with vegetable oil spray; cover cake with foil, spray side down, and seal at edges.

Bake 45 minutes. Remove foil (some cake may stick). Bake until top is golden brown, edges are crusty, and tester inserted into center comes out clean, about 40 minutes longer. Cool 1 hour. Serve warm with cream.

Thank you to anyone who will help me make this masterpiece. BTW, the picture is far too skimpy with the cream - I used to DRENCH it.

Here's a picture of it - to get a sense of what it looks like - linked from bigoven.com - credit to IvySue

http://mda.bigoven.com/pics/rs/256/w...ch-pudding.jpg

This looks so promising. Has anyone come up with a viable recipe:dunno:

RVcook 10-31-2012 07:08 PM

My answers to some of your questions. I have used Jen's mix quite successfully and think I have a good grasp on it's idiosyncrasies.

Quote:

Originally Posted by sbarr (Post 16007435)
...

What are the ingredients in Jen's bake mix?

Jens LC-GF Bake Mix:
1 2/3 C. Almond Flour
3/4 C. Oat Flour
2 TB sifted coconut flour
3/4 tsp. xanthan gum

Can Jen's bake mix be substituted for flour 1:1? Do they have identical liquid needs?

Not exactly 1:1. I have a regular muffin recipe that calls for 2 C. flour so I use 2 1/4 C. Also, an extra egg is always needed. Her 'rules' for subbing: Add 1/4 C. additional bake mix when subbing for 1 C or more flour and use 2 TB additional bake mix when subbing for less than 1 C. Always begin by adding an extra egg in muffins, loaves, cakes and coffee cakes, except for cookies or when less than 1 C. is used. Withhold 1/4 of the liquid/wet ingredients and add as needed to achieve correct texture.

Is there something about Jen's bake mix that would make cooking longer a problem, i.e., would it dry out? - this recipe is cooked for 85 minutes (the first 40 covered with foil)

Not sure about this one, but I usually have to bake my converted regular recipes for less time.

Is there anything about sucralose and erythrytol that bakers adapt a little bit lower (or is this just a legitimate recipe difference, one cake is sweeter)

I usually sub for an equivalent sugar sweetness. If this is your first time subbing, I would err on the side of caution and add more if needed.

What is the purpose of the cream of tartar in this type of recipe? :o

The cream of tartar helps the whipped egg whites hold up which add lightness to the recipe. You could make it without the cream of tartar, but I suspect that the height of the finished cake wouldn't be as tall.

What is the purpose of the baking soda in this type of recipe? :o:o

Baking soda assists in balancing off the leavening that is somewhat compromised by the cream of tartar. Its an 'acid -vs- base' chemical issue...

I say go ahead and try it. The thing I would be most concerned with would be the baking time. The rest should be pretty easy...really.

HTH

That Girl 11-01-2012 08:48 AM

I just checked the carb count for the oat flour and for a third cup of it, netrition says it's 22 net carbs.......is there any other sub for the oat flour? That sounds like such a high count for me...yikes!

RVcook 11-01-2012 09:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by That Girl (Post 16051521)
I just checked the carb count for the oat flour and for a third cup of it, netrition says it's 22 net carbs.......is there any other sub for the oat flour? That sounds like such a high count for me...yikes!

You are correct so if we do the math:
22g net carbs for 1/3 C.
22 x 3 = 66g for 1 C.
66 / 4 = 16.5g per 1/4 C.
16.5 x 3 = 49.5 per 3/4 C.

By adding 3/4 C. oat flour, you are adding approx 49.5g carbs for the entire recipe. If you get 12 servings out of a 13 x 9 pan the oat flour would contribute a total of 4.1g net carbs per serving. Of course this isn't taking into account any of the other carby ingredients, but yes...the flour definitely adds carbs.

Because of the nature of GF baking, ingredients that reproduce traditional flour-based items tend to be a little fidgety. I think Jen has found a good, basic mix that can not only be used by those looking to eliminate their intake of gluten, but to significantly reduce the carbs usually contained in standard GF mixes which are mainly a combination of starches.

If you are concerned that the mix may be too carby for your plan, you may want to consider looking for mixes that don't use it or just stick to TNT recipes that only use almond flour. There are a lot of them! But for the OP, she just wanted some advice on subbing out ingredients for her own TNT recipe and this mix may just work perfectly for her.

HTH

That Girl 11-03-2012 08:36 PM

Makes sense, thanks!

ladeeda 01-24-2013 04:48 PM

Has anyone been successful with this?


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