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Old 10-08-2012, 03:34 PM   #31
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I am going to try this..

So, you can't really eat them hot, right? Just in tater salad???
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Old 10-08-2012, 03:58 PM   #32
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Right. Cooling slowly then refrigerating them is what turns the starch into resistant starch. Reheating makes the starch change back to what it was before.

One person at the diabetes forum said they retrograde the potatoes, then heats them a little, even brown them a little and they don't spike him/her much. I'm not brave enough to try that yet, but I'd sure love to have some latkes made from real potatoes.

Last edited by Widget; 10-08-2012 at 03:59 PM..
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Old 10-08-2012, 05:10 PM   #33
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You have to boil them whole too? Is that why you want to buy the smaller ones? After cooking you drain cover and leave on counter to cool, then refrigerate?

Sorry just want to make sure I get it right.
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Old 10-08-2012, 05:17 PM   #34
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You've got it. I hope you will post the results here.
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Old 10-08-2012, 05:18 PM   #35
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Yup I will, as soon as I can pick up some potaoes I will try it.
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Old 10-08-2012, 05:32 PM   #36
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Right. Cooling slowly then refrigerating them is what turns the starch into resistant starch. Reheating makes the starch change back to what it was before.

One person at the diabetes forum said they retrograde the potatoes, then heats them a little, even brown them a little and they don't spike him/her much. I'm not brave enough to try that yet, but I'd sure love to have some latkes made from real potatoes.
How about browning mashed potato cakes and eating them after they've come down to room temp (but are still crisp)? I bet they might be almost as good that way as hot (they might even have their own peculiar charm, maybe with some cranberry sauce).
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Old 10-08-2012, 05:40 PM   #37
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How about browning mashed potato cakes and eating them after they've come down to room temp (but are still crisp)?
That won't work. Once the spuds are room temp. they have to be refrigerated for 24 hours.

I was thinking more along the lines of grated raw potato... latkes made the usual way. Cool to room temp. refrigerate 24 hrs. then lightly brown in hot oil only until heated enough to eat. But then I don't know if that will work, either. Once I get the spuds, I might give it a try.
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Old 10-08-2012, 09:40 PM   #38
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Old 10-09-2012, 11:49 AM   #39
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That won't work. Once the spuds are room temp. they have to be refrigerated for 24 hours.

I was thinking more along the lines of grated raw potato... latkes made the usual way. Cool to room temp. refrigerate 24 hrs. then lightly brown in hot oil only until heated enough to eat. But then I don't know if that will work, either. Once I get the spuds, I might give it a try.
I was thinking in terms of mashed potatoes that had already gotten the full "treatment" once. Would that be unlikely to work? (Maybe I need to re-read the thread.)
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Old 10-09-2012, 12:03 PM   #40
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I was thinking in terms of mashed potatoes that had already gotten the full "treatment" once. Would that be unlikely to work? (Maybe I need to re-read the thread.)
I think once you boil, cool and refridgerate, they have been retrograded so it wouldn't work. She was saying that some have tried heating them a little or slightly browning with no bs spike.

Then she was saying she was thinking about retrograding latkes made from raw potaotes, and then trying to heat them, but I'm wondering how that would work since you're suppose to use whole potaotes when you retrograde them.

I do know that red potatoes are the least carby ones. Those are the ones I have always eaten when wanting potatoes. I can eat a small amount without a spike as long as my bs is already at a good number, I do fine.

I can't wait to try this!!

Last edited by Ginaaaaaa; 10-09-2012 at 12:06 PM..
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Old 10-09-2012, 12:12 PM   #41
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Buttoni, I'm pretty sure that unless you have diabetes or some other type of insulin problem, you will not have a rapid rise in bg or anything showing as a response to carbs, as your body uses and makes insulin properly, unlike somebody who does have diabetes, whereas their body doesn't use or make enough insulin and will have a rise in bg after eating carbs. I think a lot of people don't realize that unless you have a medical problem with insulin you will not have the same type of response as someone who does.

Unless I misunderstood and you're going to be using the meter to test your husbands bg if he has disabetes, in that case I apologize for rambling on and on about it.
This is not true. Even a person without diabetes can have an increase in blood sugar after eating. You will not have the same type of response as a diabetic but it will rise, the problem is if it doesn't go back to normal levels in a acceptable period of time.
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Old 10-09-2012, 12:24 PM   #42
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This is not true. Even a person without diabetes can have an increase in blood sugar after eating. You will not have the same type of response as a diabetic but it will rise, the problem is if it doesn't go back to normal levels in a acceptable period of time.
Yes, but it's just a slight increase and will return to normal quickly. I was just saying that the best information on food spikes come from people who do have an insulin problem. I use to test my boyfriend after he ate a carby meal and a sweet dessert and his bg hardly went up whereas mine would go through the roof.

It's kind of redundant for someone who doesn't have diabetes or an insulin resistance to test their bg for something such as retrograded potatoes.

I wasn't saying that people who don't have diabetes have no raise in bg, I was saying they won't have a spike like someone who does have diabetes.

For the sake of misunderstanding, buttini did say she didn't have an insulin resistance, so that's what I was responding to.
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Old 10-09-2012, 12:29 PM   #43
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What exactly did I say that was untrue by the way. Please quote what part so I can understand. Thanks!!
I never said a person who doesn't have diabetes wont have a rise in bg, I said they won't have a spike like a diabetic. The same thing you said.
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Old 10-09-2012, 01:25 PM   #44
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Sorry to misunderstand but I thought it sounded like you were telling Peggy it would be a waste of time to test herself. Normal blood sugar is around 70-100 and can spike up to around 180 in non-diabetics when eating certain foods. It should return to normal levels within 1-3 hours and if it doesn't indicates symptoms of diabetes. Ideally non-diabetics should only eat things that don't cause such a rise.


Every book I've read talks about using blood glucose monitoring to see how certain foods affect levels and none indicate it should only be used on diabetics to get an accurate read.



You stated this an another post:

I was just trying to say, if you haven't been diagnosed with any insulin problems you wouldn't see any spikes of bg when testing. Your body makes and uses insulin so your bg maintains a normal level.
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Old 10-09-2012, 01:38 PM   #45
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Sorry to misunderstand but I thought it sounded like you were telling Peggy it would be a waste of time to test herself. Normal blood sugar is around 70-100 and can spike up to around 180 in non-diabetics when eating certain foods. It should return to normal levels within 1-3 hours and if it doesn't indicates symptoms of diabetes.
If someone who has not been diagnosed with diabetes is having readings up to 180, I would suggest they get tested because anything over 140 is dangerous.



To me unless you have been diagnosed or have found through self testing that your blood glucose is rising well above 100 after a meal, then it seems it would be a waste of time to monitor blood glucose.

If people are trying to discover if these potatoes will cause a blood glucose spike then who better than a diabetic? That's who I would get the best information from.

I use to test my boyfriends bg after meals and dessert and his never went above 112 that was the highest. So I'm just going by what I've seen.
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Old 10-09-2012, 02:15 PM   #46
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I was thinking in terms of mashed potatoes that had already gotten the full "treatment" once. Would that be unlikely to work?
That would be more likely to work than grated and fried raw potatoes because at one website it says that cooking (I assume they mean boiling.) causes starch to absorb water and swell. As it slowly cools, portions of the starch crystallize into a form that resists digestion.

That being said, if I grate and fry them, there won't be any water to be absorbed, so my idea probably won't work, but I will be trying it anyway because after being raised on the grated latkes, the mashed potato ones just don't cut it for me.

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She was saying that some have tried heating them a little or slightly browning with no bs spike.
One person said he has reheated retrograded potatoes and his bg didn't rise too much, but he didn't say how much. I do know that person eats quite a few things I don't because they are pretty high in carbs. I think this requires testing with bg readings.

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Then she was saying she was thinking about retrograding latkes made from raw potatoes, and then trying to heat them, but I'm wondering how that would work since you're suppose to use whole potatoes when you retrograde them.
The reason I use whole spuds is because I read on the web that boiling them whole kicks the resistant starch factor up several notches. Some of the people at the diabetes forum boiled cut-up potatoes and it didn't raise their bg as much as un-retrograded potatoes, but did raise it higher than mine, using whole new potatoes.

Looks like we have some experimenting to do so we can have some definite answers.
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Old 10-09-2012, 02:46 PM   #47
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I thought this was interesting:

You can alter the nature of the starch in potatoes by cooking and then cooling(in a fridge), this causes some of the starch to become retrograde starch which is not absorbed by the body. This effect lasts even when the potato is reheated. The variety used also matters a lot.
One study found gis of
intermediate (boiled red potatoes consumed cold: 56) to moderately high (roasted California white potatoes: 72; baked US Russet potatoes: 77) to high (instant mashed potatoes: 88; boiled red potatoes: 89) and concluded 'Individuals who wish to minimize dietary glycemic index can be advised to precook potatoes and consume them cold or reheated'
Another found a 25% reduction in GI by cooking, cooling and reheating. Others have found that adding vinegar makes it lower still as does fat, so a potato salad has a much lower gi than hot potatoes.



Also this:


At WD-50 I saw something done to the potatoes that makes a cook scream, “yes!” A method of cooking the potatoes with an explanation using true understanding of the molecules inside the potatoes and the effects of heat on them.

The potatoes are peeled, sliced, and cooked in a water bath at 65 degrees celsius for 30 minutes. The potatoes are transferred to an ice bath to cool completely. At this point the potatoes are still crisp, seemingly unchanged. Once cooled, the potatoes are cooked just as you would have had you just peeled them. If the potatoes are seemingly unchanged, you might ask what on earth did they just do?

Well, working with a method used by the commercial mashed-potatoes-in-a-box companies, they use just enough heat to cause the starch granules inside the potatoes to swell. Think of these granules as little sacks of starch molecules. They absorb water, and the starches inside grow. If they are mishandled, or bounced around by too much energy, say that of boiling water, these little bags break open freeing all those starch molecules. These rouge starches are now free to retrograde, recrystallize and cross-link forming long gummy chains. This is not good.

So, after cooking the potatoes in gentle heat, just long enough to make these starch bags swell, the potatoes are then cooled in an ice bath. The starch in the potatoes are allowed to recrystallize, or retrograde.

Wait, didn’t we just say that was bad? Well, it’s bad when the starches aren’t contained. Because of the gentle application of moderate heat those little starch sacks are intact with swollen starches inside. The ice bath forces these starches to retrograde, gel, set, what every you may, inside their sack. Retrograde is permanent. The starches are now cemented into place safely inside their granules, and you can now cook the potatoes with a more aggressive heat, and break apart the starch sacks by mashing and passing through a tammis, processing the potato. You can manipulate these particles into a nice smooth, even mashed potato with out risk of releasing the starches from their containment. No gummy paste, no stringy gluey mashed potatoes.

And the best part? You can cool the mashed potatoes, and reheat them for service with no change in texture.

Last edited by PaminKY; 10-09-2012 at 03:02 PM..
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Old 10-09-2012, 02:49 PM   #48
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Yes we sure do!! I'm hoping to find some of those small red potatoes when I go shopping because I want to try it boiling them whole. I don't think I'll be going shopping very soon because I just went, but I already have them on my next shopping list.

We will see!!
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Old 10-09-2012, 03:15 PM   #49
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Pam, that is some interesting information. Thank you for posting it. Now all we have to do is figure out how to cook the spuds at 65 degrees. Someone should invent a machine for that.
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Old 10-09-2012, 03:17 PM   #50
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Yup sounds like it would be a challenge to do that.
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Old 10-09-2012, 03:42 PM   #51
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Pam, that is some interesting information. Thank you for posting it. Now all we have to do is figure out how to cook the spuds at 65 degrees. Someone should invent a machine for that.
There are machines that do it but they're professional equipment and can be pricey. The cooking method is called Sous Vide but they also use vacuum-packing to keep the taste from cooking out.

I've found a couple of places that explain how to make one rigging up a crockpot or rice cooker (on-off kind, not fuzzy logic) but the easiest one was to use a thermometer and keep a bowl of ice cubes handy, LOL. I'm going to look at some of the equipment I have at home.
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Old 10-09-2012, 04:01 PM   #52
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If you used the thermometer and bowl of ice cubes trick, I think you'd also have to be a magician to keep it at a constant 65 degrees for 30 minutes. My thermostat says 74 degrees right now, that would be too hot for the spuds. I have a feeling this isn't a project we will be able to do at home.
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Old 10-09-2012, 04:07 PM   #53
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I re-read your earlier post and I see I was thinking fahrenheit but I see your post says celsius. That would be 149 degrees fahrenheit, that makes more sense. Good luck, I hope you can come up with a way to do it.
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Old 10-09-2012, 04:08 PM   #54
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Candy thermometer in the water? Regulating it manually by turning heat on and off..???
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Old 10-09-2012, 04:22 PM   #55
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Retrograding Potatoes (Resistant Starch)
They have the same topic over in the diabetic forum
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Old 10-09-2012, 04:32 PM   #56
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Sorry i didn't realize wdiget was talking about the forum on this site
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Old 10-09-2012, 04:41 PM   #57
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I was talking about a thread on diabetes forum, not this site.
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Old 10-09-2012, 07:01 PM   #58
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Hey with regard to different types of potatoes, I just remembered Sunlite potatoes, a strain that is supposed to be 30% lower in carbs than russets. Don't know how that compares to the red potatoes, but the Sunlites are listed at 14g of carbs after subtracting fiber for a 148g potato. (It's a variety I've never found locally, but in years past have ordered from the grower's website.)

I wonder if Michael Eades is aware of the sous vide method of retrograding potatoes, since the Eades sell a sous vide machine.

Last edited by CreekWatcher; 10-09-2012 at 07:03 PM..
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Old 10-09-2012, 07:19 PM   #59
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I wonder if Michael Eades is aware of the sous vide method of retrograding potatoes, since the Eades sell a sous vide machine.
The machine is kind of pricey. I wonder if it lets you cook at 149 degrees, that's a pretty low temp. It's nice to know there is a machine like that out there.
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Old 10-10-2012, 12:35 AM   #60
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My next experiment - I'll be going to the grocery store this afternoon and I'm going to buy some regular size red potatoes, peel and slice them as if I was going to fry them. The lowest my oven will go is 170 degrees. I'll preheat it. I don't want to use a metal pan because it might get too hot, I have a 9 by 13" black plastic Glad baking pan, I'll put luke warm water in it and place the spuds in there. I'll bake it for 45 minutes instead of 30 because it will take I don't know how many minutes for the water to heat up. I'll drain, then plunge them in ice water until cold all the way through, then I'll make American fries and weigh the spuds before eating.

I'll post the bg test results here. I am sooo hoping this will work. Keep your fingers crossed.
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