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Old 10-17-2011, 07:34 AM   #1
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i hope some of my Jewish LCFs can help me with this query.

I will be making chicken soup for the 1st time next Monday. The "soup greens"package has a large carrot, celery, onion, and the large white thing with greens sticking out one end. My earth mom and grandma called it in Yiddish 'petrishke'. What is it called in English? i am guessing it is parsnip. Am i right? Love & Profits: FLATFERENGHI
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Old 10-17-2011, 07:36 AM   #2
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Is it carrot-shaped? If so, then parsnip probably. Or is it more like a bulb on the bottom, which might be fennel?
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Old 10-17-2011, 07:41 AM   #3
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it is parsnip, then. thanks Portia

It is not fennel, because fennel has a pronounced anisette like flavor. I will eventually bring fennel into my veggie palette. Lidia Bastianich uses it quite a lot on her shows (finocchio in italian). thanks again, Portia. FF
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Old 10-17-2011, 07:50 AM   #4
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It is not fennel, because fennel has a pronounced anisette like flavor. I will eventually bring fennel into my veggie palette. Lidia Bastianich uses it quite a lot on her shows (finocchio in italian). thanks again, Portia. FF
I'm obsessed with fennel. It makes a great slaw sliced very thin and mixed with shredded red cabbage.
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Old 10-17-2011, 08:08 AM   #5
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Google says celeric or celery root or parsley root.
I searched the way you typed it then it asked for "petrushka" instead.
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Old 10-17-2011, 08:19 AM   #6
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yep--cereraic! yummy yummy stuff--makes the best soup!
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Old 10-17-2011, 08:20 AM   #7
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Its parsnips.
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Old 10-17-2011, 08:27 AM   #8
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Is the white thing carrot-shaped? If so, it's a parsnip. I don't use it in my chicken soup, but I'm a minimalist. But my mom used to add a handful of fresh dill to her chicken soup, and occasionally half a lemon. And if you're worried that the soup will be too pale-looking, leave the peel on the onion and it will "dye" the soup a lovely colour.
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Old 10-17-2011, 08:38 AM   #9
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Is the white thing carrot-shaped? If so, it's a parsnip. I don't use it in my chicken soup, but I'm a minimalist. But my mom used to add a handful of fresh dill to her chicken soup, and occasionally half a lemon. And if you're worried that the soup will be too pale-looking, leave the peel on the onion and it will "dye" the soup a lovely colour.
Parsnip is traditionally used in Jewish chicken soup. It really what makes Jewish chicken soup stand apart from other chicken soup.
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Old 10-17-2011, 10:49 AM   #10
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i like the idea of the fennel and red cabbage

but i do not wish to commit a whole vat of chicken soup to a particular flavor. i will keep it comparatively neutral, and doctor up each portion as i need it. FF
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Old 10-17-2011, 10:56 AM   #11
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but i do not wish to commit a whole vat of chicken soup to a particular flavor. i will keep it comparatively neutral, annd doctor up each portion as i need it. FF
Adding parsnips provides a very mild background flavor- its not overwelming. The thing about making chicken soup is that you really need to let the ingrediants infuse the various flavors into the broth. You can't really add them in later.

When I first started making chicken soup years ago it tasted really good but it didn't taste like my grandmothers'. I asked one of my cousins what was I missing and sure enough it was parsnip.
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Old 10-17-2011, 11:09 AM   #12
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Parsnip is traditionally used in Jewish chicken soup. It really what makes Jewish chicken soup stand apart from other chicken soup.
You know it! There are Strict Rules for chicken soup, and while my mother's addition of dill was radical, being a rebel at heart, she adhered to what her mother had taught her, which always had parsnips. She drew the line at using chicken feet, although apparently they add a tremendous amount of body to the finished product.

Quick poll: Lokshen or kneidelach? (Egg noodles or matzo balls, for the non-Yiddish speakers)
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Old 10-17-2011, 11:14 AM   #13
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Matzo balls, obviously. Even better *with* the teeny egg noodles.
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Old 10-17-2011, 11:20 AM   #14
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The skinny egg noodles, or the teeny squares? Each have their charm!

And on the subject of matzo balls, floaters or sinkers? (I like led in my zepplin when it comes to matzo balls!)
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Old 10-17-2011, 11:21 AM   #15
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The skinny egg noodles, or the teeny squares? Each have their charm!

And on the subject of matzo balls, floaters or sinkers? (I like led in my zepplin when it comes to matzo balls!)
The skinnies - with floaters. You can have my sinkers.
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Old 10-17-2011, 11:25 AM   #16
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If ya have to tether them down to keep them from floating away, they can happily float over to you! I use 1-1/3 the amount of matzo meal required to make mine as heavy as possible!
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Old 10-17-2011, 11:45 AM   #17
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Matzo Balls

I made a recipe for lower carb matzo balls using
(grandmother rolling over in grave)
crushed pork rinds, a little matzo mix, eggs, oil and they turned
out well. If anyone wants this recipe I shall post it.
We eat pork so for us it was no big deal. For kosher well that's
another story,

Oh about the chicken feet. When I was a girl my mom went
to a poultry store where you picked out a live chicken etc.
She always used the feet which are very gelatinous and distinguish
the soup in a way that the parsnips do.
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Old 10-17-2011, 12:38 PM   #18
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If ya have to tether them down to keep them from floating away, they can happily float over to you! I use 1-1/3 the amount of matzo meal required to make mine as heavy as possible!

I use seltzer for extra fluff.
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Old 10-17-2011, 12:38 PM   #19
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I made a recipe for lower carb matzo balls using
(grandmother rolling over in grave)
crushed pork rinds, a little matzo mix, eggs, oil and they turned
out well. If anyone wants this recipe I shall post it.
We eat pork so for us it was no big deal. For kosher well that's
another story,

Oh about the chicken feet. When I was a girl my mom went
to a poultry store where you picked out a live chicken etc.
She always used the feet which are very gelatinous and distinguish
the soup in a way that the parsnips do.
Barbo!! Pork matzoh balls? A shonda!!! (wags finger)
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Old 10-17-2011, 04:57 PM   #20
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Pork Matzo Balls

I know ... I know but they are very good.

He liked 'em.
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Old 10-17-2011, 05:16 PM   #21
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i forgot to ask another important question.

i know that when u first put the heat on, u bring it up to a rolling boil. How long after that do I lower it to a simmer? FF
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Old 10-17-2011, 05:50 PM   #22
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I'm not Jewish, but I opened this thread and was intersted since the subject is chicken soup. Our Church mans the local soup kitchen one day a month and my turn to do the cooking is in a couple of weeks. I'm planning on chicken noodle soup so thought I might find some hints. However, I'm afraid even the homeless that come might decide to go hungry that day if they find chicken feet floating in their soup
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Old 10-18-2011, 05:07 AM   #23
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i know that when u first put the heat on, u bring it up to a rolling boil. How long after that do I lower it to a simmer? FF
Personally, I let it boil for just a few minutes and then lower it. Are you making the stock as well or using canned stock?
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Old 10-18-2011, 07:35 AM   #24
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no, from scratch!!!

I will let it boil vigorously for 5 minutes then, lower the heat, and skim the scum that rises to the top. Then i shall let it simmer for at least 3 hours covered, or until it sucks all the flavor out of the veggies and chicken (skin on). I am refraining from adding bay leaves, or peppercorns, as my earth mom & earth grandma did. this way, i can suit each individual portion to my mood at the time. FF
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Old 10-18-2011, 07:44 AM   #25
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However, I'm afraid even the homeless that come might decide to go hungry that day if they find chicken feet floating in their soup
Don't worry - the soup is strained! The bones are discarded immediately so the cats don't get a whiff and knock over the garbage can, but the soggy soup carrots are still considered to be a prize in my family.

Since cold and flu season is coming, it's a good idea to freeze the soup in serving-sized portions (12 fl. oz. is just perfect). I use freezer bags, because they take up a lot less room. Lay them flat on a paper plate to freeze through so the bag is as compact as possible. Also, you can freeze some of the broth in ice cube trays for adding to pan drippings to make a sauce.
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Old 10-18-2011, 08:13 AM   #26
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Don't worry - the soup is strained! The bones are discarded immediately so the cats don't get a whiff and knock over the garbage can, but the soggy soup carrots are still considered to be a prize in my family.

Since cold and flu season is coming, it's a good idea to freeze the soup in serving-sized portions (12 fl. oz. is just perfect). I use freezer bags, because they take up a lot less room. Lay them flat on a paper plate to freeze through so the bag is as compact as possible. Also, you can freeze some of the broth in ice cube trays for adding to pan drippings to make a sauce.
Growing up my family had a beach home right outside of Atlantic City, NJ. One summer when I was very young my grandmother (maternal) came for a visit. One morning I went to the kitchen early one morning and opened up the refrigerator only to find a large jar of what appeared to be chicken feet emersed in this geletin like substance I later found out that jar was my grandmother's starter for chicken soup! Like all good Jewish bubbies of long ago both of my grandmothers were prepared to serve up a bowl of chicken soup at a moments notice. By the way I not only put parsnip in my chicken soup but I also put dill in it.
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Old 10-18-2011, 08:51 AM   #27
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Cheryl, did your grandmother also make ptcheh? It was a meat jelly with things floating in it. My grandfather had it every Saturday after shul. (We kids lucked out and got TV dinners.)

Now you've got me thinking about the family's Sick Menu - if you were in the worst phase of the flu, you got nuthin' but broth, and as your condition improved, you upgraded to getting meat from the soup as well, then watery mashed potatoes, and finally you were "permitted" the veggies. The "soup starter kit" was the equivalent of a first aid kit in the Jewish household.
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Old 10-18-2011, 09:04 AM   #28
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Cheryl, did your grandmother also make ptcheh? It was a meat jelly with things floating in it. My grandfather had it every Saturday after shul. (We kids lucked out and got TV dinners.)
Thankfully I've never even heard of ptcheh! I looked it up and it apparently is calf's foot jelly One of the dishes that my paternal grandmother used to make often was Honeyed Nahit (Chick Peas)- it consisted of chick peas, rice, butter and honey. I have fond memories of it.
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Old 10-18-2011, 09:12 AM   #29
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We never had Honeyed Nahit. My father was diabetic, so everything was cooked without sugar or honey, whenever possible, or with artificial sweeteners. (Baked apples made with diet cherry soda poured over them, tzimmes sweetened with pineapple canned in juice, etc., etc.)
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Old 10-18-2011, 12:43 PM   #30
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I'm still recovering from the pork matzoh balls....
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