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Old 02-25-2003, 07:23 AM   #1
 
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chocolate

I love my chocolate. It's the hardest thing to give up on the low carb diet. I tried making my own chocolate and I can't seem to get it to solidify at room temp.
I've melted chocolate and added Splenda and Stevia and they don't seem to blend with the chocolate. I've added heavy cream and half and half. Still poor results. Can anyone help.
Thanks!
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Old 02-25-2003, 09:15 AM   #2
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I have had the same experience and I'm hoping that someone has the answers
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Old 02-25-2003, 09:17 AM   #3
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Pure Delite Chocolate bars are the best, seriously, I like the Dark Chocolate better than Hersheys... But you have to eat them uhh carefully? When I first started I could eat them like nothing else... but now they have a bad effect on my stomach, so I make cookies... lol... Carbolite and the Atkins chocolate is good also... I know they are really expensive but go to Wal-Mart, all those chocolate bars that I mentioned are only .96 cents as opposed to $1.19 at the health food store... I hope I helped, I'm sorry that I do not have any good chocolate recipes, but the recipes posted on the bulletin board are normally very good, so I'm sure something will come up : )
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Old 02-25-2003, 09:21 AM   #4
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I've made chocolate with the SF baking chocolate.

1 oz square of sf chocolate
1 tbsp butter
melted together

add 1 tbsp cream and 1 tbsp splenda (to taste)

I usually put some nut of coconut in it then stick it into the freezer to harden fast so I can eat it quicker. But I think it would harden at room temp or in fridge.

Bernie
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Old 02-25-2003, 09:39 AM   #5
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I REALLY like dark chocolate. When I want a piece of chocolate I eat 1/2 oz of Baker's Unsweetened Chocolate Baking squares.
It is 7g fat, 2g net carb, 2g protein and 70 calories. It definitely is not sweet but is good if you like dark chocolate.
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Old 02-25-2003, 10:51 AM   #6
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Can't remember where I found this, but it's pretty good.

Lynne’s Chocolate

1 oz Semi-Sweet Chocolate
2 Tbs Butter
1 Tbs Heavy Cream
¼ tsp vanilla extract
5 packages of sugar

Melt chocolate and butter carefully
Remove from heat
Add cream, vanilla, and sugar
Chill
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Old 02-25-2003, 01:29 PM   #7
 
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sf

I've seen this before, forgive my ignorance but what is sf?
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Old 02-25-2003, 01:40 PM   #8
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sugar free
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Old 02-26-2003, 07:15 AM   #9
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Most chocolate contains cocoa butter as a base so I have a feeling that this is the reason that it doesn't harden at room temp. Most of the recipes I've seen have to be put in freezer to harden and then they have to be kept here until ready to be eaten. I've tried several using the melted unsweetened bars and they do work up nicely in the freezer but have yet to have stay hard like a candy bar at room temp.
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Old 02-26-2003, 07:42 AM   #10
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Sorry but this is the recipe for LYNN'S Chocolate -----1oz.of unsweetened chocolate----------2 T.butter--------1T. cream-----1 T. splenda or to taste-----------chopped nuts (optional) This is great. There is also Russell Stovers chocolates in a bag @ walmarts for about 6 in a pack for $1.79. They do have sugars alchols so be careful. The flavors are peanutbutter cups, That taste like reeses,truffles, I think butter toffee. Just be careful. Ess
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Old 02-26-2003, 11:11 AM   #11
 
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Thank you all for your replies. I tried the recipe and it did solidify in the fridge, some what. They are delicious! I just don't understand, if you can buy unsweetened chocolate in a bar right off the shelf why not be able to add sugar and have it solidify? Oh well, I guess it has something to do with chemistry, a subject that I'm virutally clueless on.
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Old 02-26-2003, 11:35 AM   #12
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Chocolate

I've found that one or 2 Hershey's kisses doesnt do much to hurt my weight loss. Two kisses contain about 4 grams of carbs.
BUT I've found a much better solution!!! In the same area in the grocery store that you can find the Atkin's powdered drinks and bars, there is a product called Carb Solutions. It is costs less than half the cost of the Atkins brand and it tastes fantastic! The chocolate flavored 8oz drink only contains 4 grams of carbs!! A lot more chocolate than 2 kisses. I drink it in the morning as breakfast - 19 grams of protein is pretty good! Since it isnt easy to get this stuff to mix together on the fly, I mix a few batches in the blender and put it in a container in the fridge so its ready to go. After dinner a small glass hits the spot in lieu of desert. Now if only I can get them to start paying me a commission for promoting their product! Amy
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Old 02-27-2003, 04:50 AM   #13
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Also if you have a World Market near you, go check them out. They have all the imported type foods and excellent Sugar Free chocolates. Belgian, Swiss, etc....and they melt in your mouth they are so smooth.

I haven't experience the laxitive effect most do on these chocolates, but if I eat tooo much I get bloated.
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Old 02-27-2003, 09:57 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally posted by bookkeeperdeb
Thank you all for your replies. I tried the recipe and it did solidify in the fridge, some what. They are delicious! I just don't understand, if you can buy unsweetened chocolate in a bar right off the shelf why not be able to add sugar and have it solidify? Oh well, I guess it has something to do with chemistry, a subject that I'm virutally clueless on.
I think you need to temper the chocolate to maintain the consistency you want. I've never done it but I've seen it done on some cooking shows on TV. I did a little web search at the FoodNetwork website and came up with this information from a recipe there. They were using regular chocolate sweetened with sugar and I don't know if the crystalline structure of sugar is important to the process. However, since you can buy SF chocolate that is set, it seems logical that you should be able to achieve this effect at home.

-----------------------------------

TEMPERING CHOCOLATE: Tempering is important because it determines the final gloss, hardness, and contraction of the chocolate. Those factors are evidence that the cocoa butter in the chocolate has been correctly crystallized. Chocolate is purchased in its tempered form. It snaps when you break it, usually has a nice shine to it and it is hard. In order to use it, you need to melt it. When you melt chocolate, the molecules of fat separate and you lose the temper (crystallization). If you want to use the chocolate for molding or coating, it needs to be tempered. Tempering chocolate means putting the molecules of fat back together. There are a variety of ways to do it.

One of the easiest ways to temper it is to place the chocolate in a glass bowl and put it in the microwave for 30 seconds at a time on high power until the chocolate is melted. Be very careful not to overheat it. Keep an eye on it; the chocolate will not look like it has melted because it retains its shape. The chocolate should be only slightly warmer than your bottom lip. You may still see lumps in it but, don’t worry; the residual heat of the chocolate will melt them. You can also use an immersion blender to break up the lumps and start the recrystallization process. Usually, the chocolate begins to set (recrystallize) along the side of the bowl. As it begins to crystallize, mix those crystals into the melted chocolate and they will begin the recrystallization process. I like to use a glass bowl because it retains the heat and keeps the chocolate tempered a long time.

Here is another easy way to temper chocolate. In this method, tempering is achieved by adding small pieces of unmelted chocolate to melted chocolate. The amount of unmelted chocolate to be added depends on the temperature of the melted chocolate but is usually one fourth of the total amount. I use an immersion blender to mix the 2 together.

The classic way to temper chocolate is call tabliering. Chocolate is melted over a hot water bath to a temperature between 88 and 90 F (31 to 34 C). White and milk chocolate are melted to a temperature approximately 2 F less, depending on the amount of milk fat they contain. 2/3 of the melted chocolate is poured on a cold table or marble surface. The chocolate is spread out and worked with a spatula until the temperature of the chocolate is approximately 81 F (27 C). At this stage, it is thick and begins to set. This tempered chocolate is then added to the remaining one third of non-tempered chocolate and mixed thoroughly until the mass in the bowl has a completely uniform temperature. If the temperature is still too high, part of the chocolate is further worked on the cold table until the correct temperature is reached. This is a lot of work, requires a lot of room and makes a big mess.

Here is a tip: Temper more chocolate than you need. A larger quantity will hold its temper longer than a smaller quantity (just like a large cup of coffee will stay hot longer than a small cup of espresso). You can always reuse the extra chocolate. Most people have trouble tempering because they use too small of an amount. Don’t forget to use a glass bowl.

A simple method of checking tempering is by applying a small quantity of chocolate to a piece of paper or to the point of a knife. If the chocolate has been correctly tempered it will harden evenly and show a good gloss within 5 minutes.

Remember, just like everything else in life, practice makes perfect. If your chocolate does not temper the first time, you can still eat it! Now that is an incentive!

-----------------------

Long but I hope it's helpful. I'd love to know if you try this process and if it works.
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Old 02-27-2003, 02:24 PM   #15
 
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Originally posted by cwooden

-----------------------

Long but I hope it's helpful. I'd love to know if you try this process and if it works.

I guess it does have to do with how the cholcolate is worked. This tempering process seems way out of my league.

Thanks for your research, I printed it and I'm going to give it a try.
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Old 02-27-2003, 05:39 PM   #16
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Adding to cwoodens post ;-)

I've studied a number of internet sites on tempering and find that they all begin with chocolate that has been created using sugar. The only non-sugar chocolate I've found has been created using sugar alcohols. However, sugar is not necessary in the creation of chocolate as evidenced by unsweetened baking chocolate...it's tempering that allows the fat molecules to set. Any use of water based flavorings or cream causes problems in resetting the chocolate. LorAnn features oil based chocolate flavorings that can be used (with tempering) in the amount of 5-12 drops to flavor their sugar based chocolate wafers. The mixture is then placed in a microwavable plastic container and when melted (micro 15 second intervals till melted), squeezed into chocolate molds. I've purchased the microwaveable container and molds and have prepared a non-water based sweetener by dissolving 1t pure sucralose powder (600 times as sweet as sugar...not granular Splenda) in 1T.glycerine for a concentration of 1/4t = 1 cup of sugar. I'm going to try mixing this (in a manner similar to the use of chocolate flavorings) and tempering with Hershey's Unsweetened Baking Chocolate. Will let you know how it turns out... ;-)

PS: If this works, I'll also try mixing 1T Stevia extract powder in 1T glycerine (same strength)...

Last edited by locarbman; 03-05-2003 at 05:24 AM..
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Old 02-28-2003, 11:08 AM   #17
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Thought I'd add a recent email and response regarding this thread to help clarify and perhaps spur further discussion on this topic... ;-)

----- Original Message -----

posted by locarbman 02-28-2003:

"I've studied a number of internet sites on tempering and find that they all begin with chocolate that has been created using sugar. The only non-sugar chocolate I've found has been created using sugar alcohols. However, sugar is not necessary in the creation of chocolate as evidenced by unsweetened baking chocolate...it's tempering that allows the fat molecules to set. Any use of water or cream causes problems in resetting the chocolate. LorAnn features oil based chocolate flavorings that can be used (with tempering) in the amount of 5-12 drops to flavor their sugar based chocolate wafers. The mixture is then placed in a microwavable plastic container and squeezed into chocolate molds. I've purchased the container and molds and have prepared a non-water based sweetener by dissolving 1t Splenda powder (600 times as sweet as sugar) in 1T.glycerine for a concentration of 1/4t = 1 cup of sugar. I'm going to try mixing this (in a similar manner to the use of chocolate flavorings) and tempering with Hershey's Unsweetened Baking Chocolate. Will let you know how it turns out... ;-)

PS: If this works, I'll also try mixing 1T Stevia extract powder in 1T glycerine (same strength)...

>>>>>>>

I'm a little confused about your measurements. Would you please verify that the capitalized "'T's" = Tablespoon and the lower case "t's" = teaspoons? The concentrations expressed seem incorrect? 1 Tablespoon stevia extract powder? Tempered with how much unsweetened chocolate? Seems like an awful lot of stevia, especially since the glycerine is also sweet. And by Splenda powder, do you mean pure powdered sucralose (i.e., polvosin)?

Much obliged for any clarification.

__________

LOL! This all seems perfectly clear to me... ;-)

The key is preparing a mixture at 200 times sugar. We do this with polvosin (powdered sucralose) by mixing 1oz in 2 cups of water. and with stevia by mixing 1 oz in 2/3 cup water. Thus, liquid splenda (polvosin), liquid stevia, and stevia powder all have a strength of 200 times sugar which results in the relationship of 1/4 teaspoon of sweetener approximately equal to 1 cup of sugar. Since powdered sucralose is 600 times sugar, 1 teaspoon equals 600 teaspoons of sugar. If we place 1 teaspoon powdered sucralose in 1 tablespoon of glycerin (equal to 2.25 teaspoons of sugar at 75% as sweet as sugar and thus rather insignificant compared to the powdered sucralose) then 1 teaspoon of this mixture will contain 1/3 teaspoon of powdered sucralose or the equivalent of 200 teaspoons of sugar (the magic relationship where 1/4 teaspoon will equal 50 teaspoons of sugar or ~1 cup...;-) It took about 12 hours for the powdered sucralose to dissolve (turn from milky to clear)

3/3/03 Update: If microwaved for 15 seconds, it mixes immediately ;-)

Q1. I'm a little confused about your measurements. Would you please verify that the capitalized "'T's" = Tablespoon and the lower case "t's" = teaspoons?

I so confirm!

Q2. The concentrations expressed seem incorrect?

I've checked and rechecked...

Q3. 1 Tablespoon stevia extract powder?

Yes, don't know yet whether it will dissolve in 1 Tablespoon of glycerine though...

3/3/03 Update: When microwaved for 15 seconds it mixed immediately ;-)

Q4. Tempered with how much unsweetened chocolate?

I'm going to try using 1/4t of the glycerine/powdered sucralose solution in 2oz of Hershey's Unsweetened Baking Chocolate first, read at one site that the minimum amount of chocolate should be 1.5 pounds for proper tempering...no way...lol! I did purchase a stainless steel double boiler yesterday for the experiment...

3/3/03 Update: 2oz Hershey's is way too strong...am going to try 1/4oz Hershey's (1 square or 1/2 foil wrapped bar) with 1.5oz cocoa butter...

Q5. Seems like an awful lot of stevia, especially since the glycerine is also sweet.

1 tablespoon of stevia must be mixed in 1 tablespoon of the medium, glycerine, to maintain it's strength at 200 times sugar. We need 3 times as much stevia (200 times sugar as powdered sucralose (600 times sugar) to maintain an equivalent strength at 200 times sugar...if it will dissolve as does the sucralose powder...

3/3/03 Update: It does! ;-)

1 tablespoon of the 'medium', glycerine (at 75% as sweet as sugar) is only equal to 2.25 teaspoons of sugar...rather insignificant in the scheme of things.

Just consider glycerin as water for making these specific, non-water based, solutions.

Q6. And by Splenda powder, do you mean pure powdered sucralose (i.e., polvosin)?

Yes!
__________

I'm currently waiting for my order of LorAnn chocolate flavorings to begin this experiment...am concerned about the rather intense chocolate taste in the baking chocolate and am trying to come up with some way to dilute that. Perhaps I will have to add additional cocoa butter or milk solids...any other ideas?

At the very least we may have the equvalent of a semi-sweet chocolate bar (firm at room temperature) at just 8 net carbs for 2oz (all from chocolate, Hershey almond candy bars are 1.45oz ;-).

Last edited by locarbman; 03-03-2003 at 01:13 PM..
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Old 02-28-2003, 02:37 PM   #18
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Several tricks help with better low-carb chocolate. Bakers unsweetened chocolate just isn't very good--it tends to be pretty grainy so you need glycerine. The Hershey's brand is better, and even better are the speciality brands. Another trick is to make sure you let the butter and chocolate cool a bit after you melt them, before you mix them together--otherwise they keep separating and it's kind of gross. A little cocoa powder can also help smooth out the flavors. And if you're willing to risk uncooked eggs, an egg yolk mixed in changes the texture dramatically for the better--it must be the lecithan in the egg. The yolk makes it taste more like frosting.

Here's a nice recipe from Karen Barnaby, a chef in Vancouver:

"Because chocolate is a treat, I like to use high-quality unsweetened chocolate and cocoa. The better quality chocolate has a smoother texture than the more commonly available Baker’s chocolate due to its high cocoa butter content. Callebaut, Valrhona and Scharffen Berger are all good choices.

Chocolate Truffles

Makes as many pieces as you cut it into!

* 2 oz. unsweetened chocolate
* 4 Tbsp. Splenda
* 4 Tbsp. butter, at room temperature
* 4Tbsp. whipping cream, at room temperature
* 2 tsp. vanilla extract


The success of this recipe depends upon the melted chocolate and butter being at the same temperature. If not, the chocolate and butter will separate.

Melt the chocolate either in the microwave or in a bowl over a pot of simmering water. Stir in the Splenda and cool to room temperature. Combine the chocolate and butter until smooth. Stir in cream and vanilla.

Spread evenly into a small, parchment lined loaf pan-I use one that was 4-by 7-inches. Chill until firm. Cut into pieces and store in the freezer."
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Old 03-03-2003, 06:19 PM   #19
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chocolate

I've been wanting to ask if anyone has used the socalled better chocolate, such as valrhona or ScharffenBerger, Ghirardelli. Are they worth the extra cost for flavor, texture and is the carb count the same. Thanks
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Old 03-03-2003, 07:45 PM   #20
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Re: chocolate

Quote:
Originally posted by Twokitty
I've been wanting to ask if anyone has used the socalled better chocolate, such as valrhona or ScharffenBerger, Ghirardelli. Are they worth the extra cost for flavor, texture and is the carb count the same. Thanks
I think so, especially compared to Bakers and Hershey's. I've tried Sharffen-Berger, Ghirardelli, Callebaut, Valrhona and El Rey. The better chocolates are excellent in their unsweetened form and some of them offer really good ultra-dark forms (as much as 77% cocoa) as well. I do mix the less expensive with the expensive and have liked the results. The better chocolates have a smoother texture and fuller flavor compared to the cheaper brands.
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Old 03-04-2003, 01:16 PM   #21
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Real non-sugar alcohol Chocolates ;-)

LOL! I've been trying to find an ingredient to deal with the bitterness of my chocolate experiments and ran across this site:

http://www.mrkland.com/fun/xocoatl/flavor.htm

I've copied it here as it is so hard to read on my browser...

Milk Chocolate is candy

Chocolate is very bitter. The darker and bitterer a Chocolate bar, the more Cacao it has (and the better it is).

For more than 3000 years Americans have been consuming Chocolate. Sugar has been part of the mixture for about 10% of that time. The Mayans and Aztecs of the Americas consumed Chocolate bitter and often added chilies. It was used by the common people as a spice, while the royalty drank it straight and bitter. In Latin America, Cacao is often used in it's original role as a bitter spice. Try a Molé burrito sometime. Yum! Cacao did not know sugar at all until the European love for sugar combined them.

The sweeter something is, the more sugar it has and the less Cacao it has. Chocolate is not sweet. Sugar is sweet. Candy is sugar. If it is sweet, it is not Chocolate, it is candy. Cadbury®, Hersheys®, Nestlé®, Milka® and Kinder® bars are not Chocolate, they are candy, as is all milk chocolate.

In milk-chocolate-candy, what you are tasting is NOT Chocolate. A Hersheys® Bar is about 11% Cacao! (And it is only that high because the United States Food & Drug Administration REQUIRES a minimum of 10% Cacao solids!) Cadbury®, Kinder® and Milka® are less then that! Snickers® is less than 2%. These bars all contain very tiny portions of Cacao and huge quantities of sugar and other additives. All milk chocolate contains more sugar than Cacao! This is not Chocolate; Sugar is the largest portion, the primary ingredient, and the selling point. (People call candy bars like Snickers® "chocolate" but they have a much higher percentage of both sugar and nuts than Cacao. They should be called "Nut Candy".)

Since the mid-1990s a number of the smaller chocolate manufacturers have introduced bars that are 60% - 90% Cacao. These are real Chocolate. They are the only Chocolate i buy. You will notice that some of the bars that list a high Cacao content which have weak or unpleasant flavor. Nestlé makes a 70% bar that is just awful. The addition of extra Cocoa Butter into the bar can weaken the flavor and there are many different levels and qualities of Chocolate. See the Varieties Page for a discussion of the primary cultivars.

Sugar, vegetable oils, artificial flavors, fillers and milk solids are all much cheaper than Cacao. The candy companies use any filler they can to cut down on the quantity of Chocolate they use, in fact, since flavorless Cocoa Butter is cheaper than Cacao Paste, they even raise the quantity of that, all to avoid Chocolate. Low Cacao solids means less Chocolate flavor, less money for the farmer and a higher profit margin for the manufacturer.

Most People Don't Know What Chocolate Is!

"Today the taste that most people associate with Chocolate springs primarily from the vanilla and other spices mixed with the Chocolate. Cocoa Butter has yielded to flavored forms of vegetable shortening, and now people ingest real Chocolate in such minute quantities that most of the narcotic effect has been sacrificed to the sugar rush that substitutes for it. -- Jack Weatherford

Milk chocolate is, by definition, less than 30% Chocolate and few, if any milk chocolate bars ever exceed 20%. In milk-chocolate-candy, what you taste is not Chocolate. Milk-chocolate-candy is primarily sugar and spices with almost no Chocolate at all:

Three 30 gram Hersheys® bars contain about 12 Cacao beans total,
one 100g 85% Cacao, plain Chocolate bar contains about 99 Cacao beans!
There is of course, nothing wrong with candy, or with liking candy, but don't call it Chocolate. Don't pretend you are ingesting Chocolate, and don't call yourself a Chocoholic if you eat only milk-chocolate-candy.

White Chocolate

There are two kinds of White Chocolate, both are not Chocolate.

"Real" White Chocolate is a candy bark developed for people who were allergic to Cacao. It contains not a speck of Cacao.
Much of today's fine grade White Chocolate is primarily Cocoa Butter, sugar, milk and vanilla, without any Cacao flavoring. Since there is little noticeable taste of Cacao in the common milk-chocolate-candy bar, it is easy to make a bar taste like that without Cacao flavoring.
White Chocolate is everything that is in candy bars that is not Chocolate.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Here is my current recipe:

Stevia or Splenda Sweetened ‘Solid’ Chocolate Candy:

½ oz (1/2 foil wrapped bar) Hershey's Unsweetened Baking Chocolate (2 net carbs)
1 ½ oz Cocoa Butter (0 carbs)
1/4t Stevia/Glycerin solution (1t powdered Stevia in 1t glycerin, micro 15 seconds to dissolve, equals 1c sugar, 0 carbs)
or 1/4t Splenda/Glycerin solution (1t powdered sucralose in 1T glycerin, micro 15 seconds to dissolve, equals 1c sugar, 0 carbs)
1/8t Chocolate Flavoring (I used LorAnn's Canadian Maple Flavor for Chocolate, 0 carbs)

Melt chocolate and cocoa butter in double boiler (I filled the bottom pan from the hot water tap, it was sufficient to melt the chocolate without further heating on the stove). Add sweetener and flavoring, mix well, pour into clean, dry, plastic candy mold (or lightly Pam sprayed container), allow to cool for 30 minutes at room temperature and then refrigerate to set.

Total of 2g carbohydrate (all from chocolate). I used LorAnn’s heart and happy birthday balloon molds...made 7 pieces…;-)

Tip's: 1. Cut up the chocolate and cocoa butter into small pieces. Use the least necessary amount of heat to melt. Took about 10-15 minutes to melt completely (as above).
2. A double boiler keeps chocolate melted while mixing, until ready to pour into mold.
3. Be sure to use dry utensils as any water may cause problems (wipe off upper pan before you pour ;-).
4. You may add maltitol vanilla syrup (sugar alcohol, 0 net carbs) or LorAnn Vanilla chocolate flavoring for vanilla flavor if desired.
5. You may vary the amount of chocolate, flavoring, and sweetener to taste.
6. Once you determine your favorite recipe, you can make larger amounts of Stevia or Splenda sweetened chocolate to keep in the fridge till needed, just re-melt and mold, or break up for chips, or use as an ingredient in your own recipe's... ;-)

I've just ordered more cocoa butter and LorAnn chocolate flavorings. They have Orange Brandy, Grand Marnier, Cappuccino, Cool Creme De Menthe, Creamy Hazelnut, Irish Creme, Kona Coffee (Kahlua Type), Nutty Amaretto, Royal Raspberry, Strawberry/Banana, Vanilla, and Washington Cherry special flavorings for chocolate. I plan to try my hand at making White Chocolate...no bitterness at all...;-)

PS: Adding 1T heavy whipping cream didn't cause any problem...made a creamier and lighter colored chocolate and had no negative effect on its setting. I just gave several pieces to mom and got raves! Hooray...this really works and it's so quick and easy!!! Great for those chocolate cravings, the flavor and sweeteness from just 1 piece lasts a long long time...;-)

Last edited by locarbman; 03-06-2003 at 01:02 PM..
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Old 03-04-2003, 05:15 PM   #22
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I love the Pure De-Lite dark chocolae bars. As someone else posted, you can get them at Wal-Mart for $.96.

A lot easier than buying the ingredients and making your own chocolate, IMO.
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Old 03-04-2003, 05:25 PM   #23
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Hi KellyJef,

This recipe is for those who wish to have chocolate that is not sweetened with sugar alcohols...as are all of the commercial chocolate bars that I have seen. This just serves as an alternative for those who want to make their own chocolate with all of the marvelous flavorings that are not available in commercial bars... ;-)

Cheers!
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Old 03-04-2003, 07:09 PM   #24
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Thanks for all the info Lowcarbman...

Does it really taste good? No weird aftertaste? Are you going to try any those higher end chocolates? I am looking forward to getting my shipment of liquid splenda so I can try this. Where do you get the stevia powder? Also, where are you getting your sucralose powder?

Maybe you should go into business!!
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Old 03-04-2003, 07:30 PM   #25
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Lol Heather, yes, it tastes good! Wierd aftertastes are in the mind of the taster...;-) I found my first experiments were bitter from the high percentage of unsweetened chocolate. My most recent recipe using just 1 square of unsweetened chocolate seems to have just a hint of bitterness which is natural for cacao (see above post ;-) but quite acceptable...similar to the taste of dark chocolate, however, the flavoring and sweetness make all the difference to me...you can play with the ingredients to suit your personal tastes lol! My primary objective was to make a chocolate that would be firm at room temperature like regular candy bars...this was a definite success. I'll email my sources list to you...and to anyone else who needs an update and sends me an email or private message with their email addy...I keep adding to the original list...;-) As for a business, DougieB and I are still considering opening an ice cream stand for fishing trip money...lol!

PS: I just found and purchased (at my supermarket), Droste (imported from holland) Cocoa For Drinking and Baking. The ingredient is cocoa powder, Dutch processed with alkali. Treatment with alkali reduces bitterness and may taste better than Hershey's Unsweetened Baking Chocolate. Cocoa powder treated with alkali is the chocolate ingredient listed in LorAnn's chocolate wafers (Make 'n Mold) along with sugar, partially hydrogenated vegetable oil (palm kernal and palm), milk powder, reduced mineral whey powder, skim milk powder, soya lecithin, salt, and artificial flavor.

I'm going to try to duplicate these wafers for a better tasting candy, using Stevia/Splenda glycerine solutions for sugar and cocoa butter for the vegetable oils...this project is getting interesting... ;-)

PS: I hope that others will post their experiments...LOL!


********This has become a 2 page thread ;-)********
********..............See you on page 2..............********

Last edited by locarbman; 03-12-2003 at 08:34 PM..
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Old 03-12-2003, 04:53 PM   #26
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Update re: Milk Chocolate experiment...;-)

How chocolate is made...interesting reading...;-)

http://www.chemsoc.org/chembytes/ezine/1997/chockie.htm
Food of the gods

Cocoa powder and chocolate are made from the dried seeds that grow in pods on the cocoa tree, Theobroma cacao (the name means 'food of the gods'). A native of the Amazon Basin and other tropical areas of South and Central America, the cocoa tree is now cultivated in a number of countries such as West Africa, Latin America, Malaysia and Indonesia.

Cocoa trees may yield 2030 pods a year, each containing 3040 seeds, or beans. When the pods are harvested they are split open by hand using wooden mallets and the beans, which are covered in sweet white pulp or mucilage, are removed. The beans then go through a fermentation process. In West Africa the traditional 'heap' method is used: wet cocoa beans, still surrounded by the pulp, are piled on banana or plantain leaves spread out on the ground. The beans are covered by more leaves and then left to ferment for 5 to 6 days. During this time the pulp and astringency of the beans are removed as the sugar in the pulp turns to alcohol and sugary liquids, which drain away, while the chocolate flavour starts to develop. When fermentation is complete, the beans are dried and then roasted (the length of roasting time depends on whether the end-use is cocoa or chocolate). During roasting, the beans acquire their characteristic flavour and aroma.

Around 300 chemicals are formed during these processes, including the methylxanthines caffeine and theobromine, and phenylethylamine, which is closely related to amphetamines. The beans are then broken down (by a process called kibbling) into small pieces called 'nibs' and the brittle shells are blown away by air currents (winnowing). The nibs are ground down into a thick chocolate-coloured liquid known as 'mass', which contains 5558 per cent cocoa butter. This solidifies on cooling and forms the basis of all chocolate and cocoa products.

Cocoa powder is made by extracting about half the cocoa butter in heavy duty presses for later use in chocolate making. The solid block of cocoa remaining after the extraction is pulverised into a fine powder. Drinking chocolate has sugar and natural flavourings added.

At Cadbury's, making milk chocolate involves mixing the 'mass' with fresh liquid full cream milk and sugar, which has already been evaporated to a thick liquid. The resulting liquid is dried to form a 'crumb' which is then pulverised and mixed with additional cocoa butter and flavourings. In the UK, vegetable fat (up to 5 per cent) is added to help control the chocolate's melting processes. For plain chocolate, the mass is combined with sugar and cocoa butter before pulverisation and this undergoes the same final production changes as milk chocolate.

The final stages of production include the processes of 'conching' and 'tempering', which ensure that the chocolate is produced with the fat in a specific physical structure to ensure the right texture. 'Conching' involves mixing and beating the semi-liquid mixture to develop the flavour, remove unwanted volatile flavours and reduce the viscosity and particle size. 'Tempering' is the final stage of the production it involves mixing and cooling the liquid chocolate under carefully controlled conditions to produce chocolate in which the fat has set in its most stable crystalline form. It is the tempering of the chocolate that gives it its smoothness, gloss and snap. The control of this process is one of the skills of the chocolatier.

While the Americans prefer dark chocolate with the smokey flavours of South American beans, continental Europeans prefer plain chocolate which has a higher cocoa content and is finer ground than British chocolate. The percentage of vegetable fat permitted in chocolate has been a cause for controversy within the European Union in recent years. Last year the European Commission announced that the Chocolate Directive will leave it up to EU member states to allow the use in chocolate of vegetable fats other than cocoa butter up to a limit of 5 per cent and listed on the label.
__________
Additional info...

Chocolate Chips, Semi-Sweet:
6 ounces semi-sweet chocolate, chopped, can be substituted for 1 cup (6 ounces) semi-sweet chocolate chips. When substituting for chocolate chips, make sure to use the same type of chocolate (i.e. semi-sweet, milk).

Chocolate, Semi-Sweet:
3 tablespoons chocolate chips OR 1 square (1-ounce) unsweetened chocolate plus 1 tablespoon sugar can be substituted for 1 square (1-ounce) semi-sweet chocolate. 6 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder plus 7 tablespoons sugar plus 1/4 cup fat can be substituted for 6 ounces semi-sweet chocolate.

Chocolate, Sweet Baking (German):
1/4 cup unsweetened cocoa powder plus 1/3 cup sugar and 3 tablespoons fat can be substituted for 4 ounces German sweet baking chocolate.

Chocolate, Unsweetened:
1 2/3 ounce semisweet chocolate (reduce sugar in recipe by 2 teaspoons) OR 3 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa plus 1 tablespoon butter, margarine or shortening can be used instead of 1 ounce unsweetened baking chocolate or 1 ounce premelted unsweetened chocolate.

Different types of chocolate
Chocolate begins as a cocoa bean which has been carefully fermented, dried, and roasted. The roasted beans are shelled and cracked into tiny pieces called nibs. The nibs are then ground to produce a semi-fluid, thick mixture called chocolate liquor. The chocolate liquor is sold as bitter or cooking chocolate. Bitter chocolate has no sugar added so it has a wonderful, rich, deep flavour. Many customers use it in savoury ethnic dishes.

Bitter-sweet:
Sweetened dark chocolate that is generally more intensely chocolate flavoured than semi-sweet. In North America, many manufacturers use the term bitter-sweet when they mean semi-sweet and vice-versa. True bitter-sweet chocolate contains at least 50% chocolate liquor.

Semi-sweet:
A dark chocolate that is milder than the bitter-sweet. It is less intensely flavoured and contains about 35% chocolate liquor. It should not contain more than 12% dairy solids.

Milk chocolate:
A light-coloured chocolate containing at least 3.39% butterfat, 12% milk solids, and only 10% chocolate liquor. This is the most popular eating chocolate due to its creaminess and sweetness.

White chocolate:
Resembles milk chocolate in composition except that it does not contain any chocolate liquor. It must contain at least 20% cocoa butter, 14% milk solids, and a maximum 55% sugar. This is the most expensive chocolate to buy.
__________

My Milk Chocolate Ingredient (ideas ;-):

-Vegetable Glycerin (a non water-based medium) -
-Chocolate – Droste Cocoa Powder (Dutch processed with alkali) make a paste of 1:3 glycerin to cocoa powder or
- Hershey’s Unsweetened Baking Chocolate
-Cocoa Butter -
-Cream Powder – make a paste of 1:3 glycerin to cream powder
-Sweetener – make a 1:1 mixture of Stevia Extract Powder or 1:3 mixture of Sucralose Powder to Glycerin
-Vanilla – LorAnn, oil based, Vanilla for Chocolate or Steel’s Maltitol Vanilla Syrup or make a mixture of 1 vanilla bean steeped in 12oz glycerin (if this works, it would probably take some time ;-)
-Liquid Lecithin
-Salt – mixture of ¼ t salt in 1 T glycerin (will not all dissolve, decant for salt crystal free mixture)
-Flavoring – LorAnn, oil based, chocolate flavoring of choice

Recipe (idea):
Trial #1:
Mix 3T cocoa powder w/3t cream powder, make paste w/ 1T stevia/glycerine (4c sugar), add 1/4t lecithin, 1/4t LorAnn Vanilla for chocolate, 1/2t salt/glycerine, mix in 2oz? cocoa butter

I plan to do this trial as soon as my cream powder arrives…will post results..;-)

RESULTS!

I did:

1T Cocoa powder/1t (Droste, NOW)
2t Cream powder/1t (Rocky Mountain Spice Co., NOW)
2t Vegetable glycerin (NOW)
1/4t Salt/glycerin (Morton, NOW)
1/4t Stevia powder/glycerin (NOW, NOW)
1/4t Sucralose powder/glycerin (BBP, NOW)
5d Vanilla Flavoring (LorAnn)
1/4t Liquid Lecithin (NOW)
2oz Cocoa Butter (Cedar Vale)

I mixed cocoa powder, cream powder, vegetable glycerin, salt/glycerin, stevia/glycerin, sucralose/glycerin, vanilla flavoring, liquid lecithin into a paste. I next Stirred the warm paste mixture into melted cocoa butter, poured into chocolate mold. Let cool for 30 minutes, refrigerated to set. The cocoa butter and paste mixture separated unlike the Hershey's Unsweetened Baking Chocolate recipe...

***** IT DIDN'T WORK! ;-( *****

3/22/03 Update:http://www.pioneerthinking.com/glycerin.html

Per this site:
http://www.pioneerthinking.com/glycerin.html
"Glycerin is a neutral, sweet-tasting, colorless, thick liquid which freezes to a gummy paste and which has a high boiling point. Glycerin can be dissolved into water or alcohol, but not oils. On the other hand, many things will dissolve into glycerin easier than they do into water or alcohol. So it is a good solvent."

I plan to retry this recipe using liquid lecithin (oil based) as a medium to replace glycerine...will post results... ;-)

For Heather ;-)

However, a friend did bring to my attention a new Carbolite Candy Bar sweetened with erythritol and splenda that you may wish to check out... ;-)

The At Last site: http://www.atlastfoods.com/
At Last! It's Here!
You can now find At Last! at Walgreens, Rite Aid, CVS, Lewis Drug, Publix and others. Check with your favorite drug store and see if they carry At Last!

At Last! is the first and only sugar-free candy to use a new sweetener system with Erythritol. Unlike other commonly used sweeteners such as maltitol, Erythritol is almost calorie-free and produces no digestive upset. Read More

Carbolite Foods, Inc. announces the introduction of a new line of candy bars specifically designed for people with diabetes. The best part? The bars taste just like real candy. Consumer taste tests conducted by Carbolite confirmed that people with diabetes who tasted the new bars thought they tasted like "real" candy, with none of the "cardboard taste" usually associated with sugar-free candy bars.

Another site:
Carbolite Foods Inc. is shipping At Last! bars designed specifically for diabetics and positioned as candy items, noted Candy Business. Sweetened with Splenda, they also contain Insulade, a mineral blend made with magnesium, zinc and chromium, said to promote improved glucose metabolism. The line is expected to be available nationwide by the end of April.

Last edited by locarbman; 03-23-2003 at 12:15 PM..
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Old 03-13-2003, 11:36 AM   #27
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Uh...yeah... I have a suggestion... when you get this figured out, could you please go into business...it looks just too damn complicated and time consuming for my already too complicated life, but I really would love to find out if it's possible to have a yummy chocolate without the sugar alcohols!!
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Old 03-13-2003, 04:51 PM   #28
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Heatherfeather-
Yes! Lindts Excellence (70% cocoa) has sugar, but it has only 11 grams of carbs per serving. For a sugar-free chocolate without sugar alcohols, Karen Barnaby's recipe (above) is very good, especially if you use better quality chocolate.
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Old 03-25-2003, 11:05 AM   #29
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Update - Heather, easiest recipe... ;-)

I Find it is necessary to replace glycerine as an ingredient solvent in my chocolate recipe because it doesn't mix with cocoa butter ;0 Liquid lecithin (which is an ingredient in all of the chocolates I have checked) works well with other ingredients to form a paste that will mix with cocoa butter...

I did:

1T Cocoa powder (Droste, 1 net carb)
1t Cream powder (Rocky Mountain Spice Co., 0.4 carbs)
1t Liquid Lecithin/Olive Oil mixture* (NOW, Bertoli, 0 carbs)
dash Salt (Morton, 0 carbs))
1/4t Stevia powder (NOW, = 1 cup sugar, 0 carbs) or
1/16t Sucralose powder (BBP, ~ 1 cup sugar, 0 carbs))
3d(rops) Vanilla Flavoring (LorAnn oil based, 0 carbs)
1.5oz Cocoa Butter (Cedar Vale, 0 carbs)

*Non-stick cooking, mix 2 parts liquid lecithin into 1 part vegetable oil.

Caution - Do not use liquid Splenda, liquid Stevia, liquid cream, glycerine, or any other water based ingredients or flavorings! Sugar alcohols and granular Splenda have too much volume to work effectively (you can't dissolve a cup full in 1 teaspoon of lecithin/oil ;-)...

Prepare a paste with cocoa powder, cream powder, liquid lecithin mixture, salt, and sweetener. In a double boiler, melt cocoa butter, add vanilla flavoring and paste. Mix well, pour into mold. Let firm for 1/2 hour and refrigerate. Makes an excellent solid chocolate that can be flavored with other LorAnn chocolate flavorings of choice (made 5 chocolate hearts ;-). You may vary the amount of cocoa powder, cream powder, powdered sweetener and flavoring to find a combination that appeals to your individual taste. Enjoy...;-)

PS: For those interested in calories, I thought this might be interesting...;-)

Oil, vegetable, cocoa butter
NDB No: 04501 Nutrient Units Value per
100 grams (~3.5oz) of
edible portion Sample
Count Std.
Error
Proximates
Water g 0.00 0
Energy kcal 884 0
Energy kj 3699 0
Protein g 0.00 0
Total lipid (fat) g 100.00 0
Ash g 0.00 0
Carbohydrate, by difference g 0.00 0
Fiber, total dietary g 0.0 0

Last edited by locarbman; 04-11-2003 at 07:45 PM..
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Old 03-25-2003, 07:01 PM   #30
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Thanks for the update!! I really will have to try this.. . just have to gather together all these ingredients...LOL...
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